A sculpted Hare jumping away from the viewer created out of Black Locust Bark.
Startled 2018 Black Locust Bark 26” x 24” x 24”
A sculpted Hare jumping away from the viewer created out of Black Locust Bark.
Startled (2) 2018 Black Locust Bark 26” x 24” x 24”
A stag stands rooted to its place, feeling the tension of the moment it knows it has been spotted. However, it chooses to not move a single muscle in hopes that it will blend into the surroundings. Any sudden movements will cause him to run into the trees
Rooted Stag (1) 2018 Black Locust Bark 24” x 14” x 31”
A stag stands rooted to its place, feeling the tension of the moment it knows it has been spotted. However, it chooses to not move a single muscle in hopes that it will blend into the surroundings. Any sudden movements will cause him to run into the trees
Rooted Stag (2) 2018 Black Locust Bark 24” x 14” x 31”
A sculpted fox that is cowering backwards. The surface is created with bark from a Black Locust Tree, each muscle is defined from how the bark is methodically placed.
Timid (1) 2017 Black Locust Bark 30” x 15” x 15”
A sculpted fox that is cowering backwards. The surface is created with bark from a Black Locust Tree, each muscle is defined from how the bark is methodically placed.
Timid (2) 2017 Black Locust Bark 30” x 15” x 15”
A photograph of a hand sculpted pelvis accompanied by the five lumbar vertebrae. Another photograph shows a hand sculpted femur, this bone connects to the acetabulum of the pelvis.
Crafting of the Bones: The Pelvic Bones 2020 Bronze, Wax, and Clay 16"x22"x8"
A photograph of a hand-sculpted rib cage lays in the sand- the rib bones are all cast in bronze. Another photograph shows the sternum and clavicle bones- all cast in bronze and patinated to give them a weathered look.
Crafting of the Bones: The Thoracic Basket 2020 Bronze and Wax 14"x16"x6"
A photograph of a hand-sculpted skeletal arm lays in the sand. Each bone is articulated from the humerus (upper arm), radius and ulna (forearm), scapula (shoulder blade), and the carpals, metacarpals, and phalanges (hand bones).
Crafting of the Bones: The Arm and Hand 2020 Bronze and Wax 14"x16"x5"
A photograph of a hand-sculpted skull that is partially buried in the sand. It is accompanied by the seven cervical vertebrae that are connected to the base of the skull.
Crafting of the Bones: The Skull 2020 Wax and bronze 2020
A photograph shows a hand-sculpted skeletal foot which includes the tarsals, metatarsals, calcaneus, and phalanges all partially buried in the sand. Another photograph shows a hand-sculpted tibia and fibula, also known as your shin bones.
Crafting of the Bones: The Skeletal Foot 2020 Wax and Clay 15"x8"'x4"
A photograph of a hand sculpted pelvis accompanied by the five lumbar vertebrae. Another photograph shows a hand sculpted femur, this bone connects to the acetabulum of the pelvis.
Crafting of the Bones: The Femur 2020 Bronze, Wax, and Clay 16"x22"x8"
A photograph shows a hand-sculpted skeletal foot which includes the tarsals, metatarsals, calcaneus, and phalanges all partially buried in the sand. Another photograph shows a hand-sculpted tibia and fibula, also known as your shin bones.
Crafting of the Bones: The Tibia 2020 Wax and Clay 15"x8"'x4"
A photograph shows a hand sculpted spinal column that includes each individual vertebrae.
Crafting of the Bones: The Spinal Column 2020 Wax and 3D Printed Elements 24"x6"x3"
A photograph of a hand-sculpted rib cage lays in the sand- the rib bones are all cast in bronze. Another photograph shows the sternum and clavicle bones- all cast in bronze and patinated to give them a weathered look.
Crafting of the Bones: The Thoracic Basket (2) 2020 Bronze and Wax 14"x16"x6"
Statement

A fascination with the natural world and the observation of my surroundings has constantly fed my artistic mind. Ever since I was a kid all I wanted was to be outside; digging in the dirt, running through the trees, and collecting stones by the riverside. My upbringing has greatly influenced my sculptural work; I draw inspiration from things found in nature and through my practice I always strive to find ways to feel like a kid again. With my bark sculptures in particular, I am able to be free in the forest as I collect my materials. Oftentimes I revisit the same park that I explored so deeply as a child and gather my Black Locust bark from the decaying trees. Each piece of bark is methodically put together like a puzzle to give life to a woodland animal; those that I would observe in the past and present as I wandered through the forest.

Focusing on the anatomy of the subject, the bark begins to mimic the muscles present in the animal. Gently curving and following the forms of the woodland creature to create the surface. I’ve always strived to fit small forms of research into my sculptural work. Whether it be a specific animal’s anatomy or more recently the internal structural workings of a body; I’ve always found ways to educate myself further in a specific topic by using my sculptural lens.  I’ve become captivated by the skeletal anatomy and learning the ins and outs of all bones present in our bodies. Through allowing my audience to interact with the bones that I sculpt, they can feel and touch the crafted surfaces, thus allowing them to explore the bones’ connections to one another.  As I continue to research the subjects present in my work, I am always striving to find new ways to pass down my sculptural discoveries to the audience.