A photograph of the ground level at Gould Street Generating Station, just months after its closure.
Closure of Gould Street Generating Station II 2019 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
A photograph of Gould Street Generating Station's front office, subject to neglect and decay just three months after its retirement.
Closure of Gould Street Generating Station 2019 Archival inkjet print 30 x 24 in
An excavator demolishes the side of C.P. Crane Power Plant in January of 2020. The coal burning facility was temporarily shut down due to improper emission testing and surpassing imposed limits on particulate matter. Maryland claims that a conversion to n
C.P. Crane Construction 2019 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
Eutrophication, or the excessive growth of algae in a natural body of water due to overabundance of nutrients, is seen in this section of the Gwynns Falls Stream.
Eutrophication 2020 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
A photograph of an oil slick as seen from under the I-95 highway.
Oil 2020 Archival inkjet print 30 x 24 in
A photograph of the setting sun hitting one building of Gould Street Generating Station. A transformer and power lines fill in the rest of the frame, alluding to its vast power production.
Power 2019 Archival inkjet print 30 x 24 in
A photograph of water storage tanks at the Gould Street Generating Station.
Storage Tanks 2019 Archival inkjet print 30 x 24
A diesel truck leaves the Sunoco storage terminal on Northbridge Avenue in Curtis Bay, Maryland. Sunoco processes and stores refined petroleum products and crude oil at these facilities.
Sunoco Terminal 2020 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
Transportation of Coal and Gas. Archival inkjet print
Transportation of Coal and Gas 2020 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
A photograph of the Wheelabrator Incinerator, which sits just beyond a set of row homes in the neighborhood of Westport.
Wheelabrator Incinerator 2020 Archival inkjet print 24 x 30 in
Statement

Exhaustion of nonrenewable resources has caused entropic watersheds, or historic shifts, to arise throughout our known industrialization. Societies have been repeatedly forced to switch from one material to another, following depletion of the prior. Deforestation caused the first jump from wood to coal; mining complications pushed us to discover oil, and climate change’s demand for emission regulations now forces our transition to renewables.

The current phase is causing a drastic switch in the way our world functions, especially here in Baltimore. Various fossil fuel-based facilities have undergone large transformations to adapt to a changing climate, while others are left to the elements, shuttered. This series, Entropy, documents the processes in which our lights are powered, our cars are fueled, and our city is maintained. It is a privilege to be so detached from them, as this industry pushes to the edges of lower class neighborhoods and “untouched” land. The power plants and their makers contaminate air, water, and human life with little regulation or remorse. Through the exploration of retired and functioning sites, I aim to understand all consequences that come with overconsumption of power.