Handmade cotton rag paper at 20"x 16" using paper pulp to stencil statements voicing the urgencies of now.
One More Time For the People In the Back, Series (WIP) 2020 Handmade paper pulp posters 20" x 16"
Handmade cotton rag paper at 20"x 16" using paper pulp to stencil statements voicing the urgencies of now.
One More Time For the People In the Back, Series (WIP) 2 2020 Handmade paper pulp posters 20" x 16"
Handmade cotton rag paper at 20"x 16" using paper pulp to stencil statements voicing the urgencies of now
One More Time For the People In the Back, Series (WIP) 3 2020 Handmade paper pulp posters 20" x 16"
4.5" x 5" woodcut relief print on 25" x 38" kozo natural paper
Mass 2020 Woodcut Relief on Kozo natural 25" x 38"
4.5" x 5" woodcut relief print on 25" x 38" kozo natural paper
Release 2020 Woodcut relief on Kozo Natural 25" x 38"
Triptych of three prints conveying silhouette profiles on the left and right of black people with bitmapped roman sculpture heads in the middle.
Higher Pedestal 2019 Screenprint on Rives BFK Lightweight 11" x 15" each
Handcut and Lasercut Handmade Black Cotton Rag Paper Installation of Black silhouette imagery.
Moments 2019 Handcut and lasercut handmade black cotton rag paper installation 42" x 84"
Nine, 18" x18" digitally printed essays using 100 words in 20 stanzas to express grievances.
Mean & Surly Essays 2019 Digital 18" x 18" each, at 54" x 54" together
Statement

“I am invisible, understand, simply because people refuse to see me. Like the bodiless heads you see sometimes in circus sideshows, it is as though I have been surrounded by mirrors of hard, distorting glass. When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination, indeed, everything and anything except me.”
—Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man

Sometimes we see something more clearly by seeing less of it, as extraneous detail is filtered away. Print is built up of a multitude of mechanics and systems. In its simplest form, print consists of three components: The Matrix, The Transfer, The Support. Using and reinterpreting this system through print and paper, I explore the use of filtering specific information away, in order to reveal authentic narratives.

Silhouette portraiture and the production of cameo jewelry are some of the earliest instances of racial profiling. Nearly two hundred years ago, before the camera was invented, someone wishing to have an inexpensive portrait created of their loved one or of themself would have visited a silhouette artist. Within minutes, using typically only a pair of scissors, the artist would have produced a small image with a remarkable resemblance to his subject.

If the silhouette gave shape to a broad vision of American citizenry, the form equally allowed Americans to mark out those who were less welcome in the new nation: the foreign, the un-American, and the strange. By observing the slight curves of the face and angles of noses and foreheads, the absence of facial information was able to reveal identity in an instant.

Employing previous art history references, this body of work embraces contemporary symbols and communication native to the Black American and poses the question,
“What does it mean and look like to be Black in America right now?”

My work through paper and print tells a connected narrative of isolation, alienation, and rejection but ultimately explores the nature of love and familiarity amongst blackness. Central to this, reoccurring themes and symbols are the silhouette and profile cameo, contemporary language, and culturally symbolic imagery help form a concentration of recognition.