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Art History Course List

View titles & descriptions for the Art History Department's courses offered.

Click a Course's Title to read its description .

Course # Course Title Credits
AH 100 Art Matters 3.00 credits
Introduces students to the interpretation of art, architecture, and design. The course is not a survey course. Rather, it focuses on teaching students how historians, curators, and critics approach the study of art, architecture, and design in context – the types of questions they ask and the methods they use to answer those questions. Different sections of this course will focus on specific themes that will guide the content of each section. When registering, students will have the opportunity to list their order of preference for the themes offered each semester. Students in all sections will complete a common series of art-historical writing assignments and will receive instruction in library use and research.

AH 200 Renaissance Through 1855 3.00 credits
Surveys European art from the 14th through the mid-19th centuries. It surveys Renaissance art in Italy and Northern Europe, its origins in medieval art, and examines shifts in artistic concepts and forms from the 16th through the mid-18th centuries that led to the emergence of Mannerist, Baroque, and Rococo art. And concludes with an examination of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism.

Prerequisite: AH 100

AH 201 Modernism & After 3.00 credits
Offers a survey of avant-garde European and American art from the mid-19th century to the present. Some of the many artistic movements covered include Realism, Impressionism, post-Impressionism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, de Stijl, early American Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and post-Modernism.

Prerequisite: AH 100

AH 202 Ancient Through Gothic 3.00 credits
Surveys the art of Europe and the Near East from the prehistoric period through the 14th century CE. Cultures and styles examined include Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic, with an emphasis on how the arts of the ancient and medieval periods interact to form the basis for the later Western tradition.

Prerequisite: AH 100

AH 231-IH1 Italian Renaiss Thought & Art 3.00 credits
Involves an extended consideration of several patterns of thought in the Italian Renaissance, and of the relationship between the history of ideas and the history of art. Generally, each session involves a close analysis of an artist or groups of artists, of related primary documents, and of the broader implications of both. By the end of the semester, students should be comfortable discussing the Italian Renaissance as an artistic and intellectual movement, as well as the work of many of its primary artists and thinkers.

Prerequisite: AH100 & Sophomore level or higher

AH 250 Wrld Arch: Pre-history to 1855 3.00 credits
Introduces world architecture from pre-history to the mid-nineteenth century. Students will analyze buildings, sites, and cities from Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe, alongside architectural concepts, artistic movements, and social phenomena. In this way, this course is a focused examination of key architectural developments in time and space. Students will gain not only a broad repertoire of architectural references, but—more importantly—a critical perspective on architecture in its cultural and historical context.

Prerequisite: AH 100

AH 301 Arts of China 3.00 credits
Often described as having five thousand years of culture, China is the source of longstanding artistic traditions that have influenced artistic production throughout East Asia and also in the West. In this course, material culture produced in the region now known as “China” from approximately 1200 BCE to the late 19th century will be examined. Students will begin by examining the early growth of what came to be called Chinese culture by studying developments in philosophy, technology and the design of material goods (such as bronze vessels). Then examine how this culture was expressed in a variety of art forms, focusing primarily on sculpture, painting, calligraphy, printmaking, and ceramics. In studying Chinese art, changes in China’s political system, religions, and economy, paying special attention to how those developments caused changes in China’s visual arts will also be studied.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 302 Arts of Japan 3.00 credits
Overviews Japanese art from the prehistoric period to modern times. Religious art, including that of Shinto and various schools of Buddhism will be discussed. Students will also examine Japan’s secular art such as paintings commissioned by the shoguns, Edo-period woodblock prints produced for a wide audience, and modern and contemporary works that circulate in today’s international art market.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 305 American Mural Traditions 3.00 credits
Examines the development of murals in the United States from 12,000 BCE to the 21st Century. The course will consider many types of murals and their roles in respective societies, including Colonial and American Indian cultures. Additionally, more recent mural initiatives will be explored, from the WPA projects of the 1930s, Baltimore's murals from the 1970s that explore Civil Rights debates, the current Station North Arts District murals, as well as the vibrant projects of urban beautification sponsored by the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 306 Introduction to Art Criticism 3.00 credits
“What is the function of a critic?” asked W.H. Auden in 1963. This course considers a range of potential answers to Auden’s question, through an overview of the history of art criticism, through a close reading of the work of several influential art critics, and through assignments that will require students to develop critical stances of their own, in relation to current shows and/or films.

Prerequisite: AH 201 or Graduate/ Post-Bac standing

AH 309 Art Since the 1960'S 3.00 credits
Examines important developments in American and European art and criticism from the 1960s until the present. Topics include Minimalism, Pop, Conceptual Art, Earthworks, the art of institutional critique, performance, Feminism, site-specificity, appropriation and commodity art, activism, and Post-Modernism.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 310 Art/Arch of Ancient Near East 3.00 credits
Examines the diverse artistic traditions of the ancient Near East: pre- and protohistoric Sumerian, Akkadian, Neo-Sumerian, Babylonian, Kassite, Middle and neo-Assyrian, neo-Babylonian, Persian, Hittite, Phoenician, Ugaritic, Syro-Palestinian, Israelite, and the Hellenistic and Roman East. Topic-driven and centered around student exploration and discussion, this course is for those interested in ancient art, archaeology, and Middle Eastern culture.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 313 Modern/Contemporary Korean Art 3.00 credits
Introduces a selection of significant Korean artistic and cultural elements and practices during the 20th and 21st century aiming to identify a unique pattern of cultural and artistic construction throughout the modern and contemporary periods of Korea. Introducing the fundamentals of Korean art and culture in interdisciplinary and comparative approaches, this course will contrast Korean cultural aspects and expectations with that of other Asian nations. Korean artists with similar patterns have renewed, appropriated, and transformed traditional Korean values: language, themes, philosophies, religions, and styles, as they have tried to better define themselves and the culture they represent in the context of the hegemony of western modernism. Topics span the appropriation of traditional media and genre, the redefinition of old themes or symbols, the engagement with politics, society, and the states, the exploration of consumerism and popular culture, and Korean's urbanization. The intersection of western and Korean artistic styles found in Asia and in the Korean Diasporas will also be explored.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 319 Art/Arch of Ancient Egypt 3.00 credits
Examines the art and architectural traditions of one of the most influential of the world’s civilizations: ancient Egypt. Beginning with the village culture of the pre-dynastic period, students study the rise of the pharaonic power and the Egyptian state in the early dynastic period, the great achievements of the old, middle, and new kingdoms, the increased impact of foreign ideas in the late dynastic period, and the brilliant new culture formed by the arrival of Greeks and Romans in the Ptolemaic and Romano-Egyptian periods. Other civilizations of northeast Africa, especially those of Sudan are investigated.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 321 Greek Art and Architecture 3.00 credits
An in-depth treatment of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period, focusing on important topics currently or traditionally discussed in the discipline, including problems of interpretation in Bronze Age art, attributions in Archaic and Classical art, perceptions concerning Hellenistic art, the influence of Greek tradition on later art styles, and the continuation of Greek art as a living tradition within the modern Western consciousness.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 322 American Folk Life & Folk Art 3.00 credits
Through a series of introductory lectures and training in field research methods, students design and conduct research projects that address the three main pivots of folk cultural studies—community, genre, and interpretation.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 324 History of World Textiles 3.00 credits
Provides students with a general overview of the development of textile forms and practices in various geographies and cultures, including Africa, Asia, the early Americas, India, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, and Islamic cultures.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 326 History of Prints 3.00 credits
Examines the evolution of modern printmaking from the Renaissance through the 19th and 20th centuries using the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art, particularly those from the Lucas and Cone collections. The first part of the course will focus on the technical innovations of earlier printmakers including the invention of lithography and seriography. With these innovations and a growing recognition of the print’s artistic significance, the stage was set for the rapid growth of the print in the 20th century.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 327 Oceanic Arts and Cultures 3.00 credits
Examines cultures from each of the major geographic regions of the Pacific: Melanesia, Indonesia, Australia, Micronesia, and Polynesia, in terms of the form and content of artistic expression and the roles of art forms in their respective societies. Specific areas are used to illustrate the importance of art forms to trade, religion, social reproduction, and social authority. This course enables students to visually differentiate between artistic forms from various parts of Oceania, to broaden their factual knowledge about the region, and to enable them to understand the variety of ways in which people express history, cosmology, and identity.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 328 Landscape Architecture History 3.00 credits
Introduces the history and theory of landscape architecture. This courses focuses on the key sites, figures, and stylistic movements in landscape design in a broad historical and geographic perspective, interpreting the work of the leading practitioners—from André Le Nôtre, “Capability” Brown, and Frederick Law Olmsted to Garrett Eckbo and Lawrence Halprin—in their social, intellectual, and artistic context. Students will investigate the historical evolution of the ideas of nature and landscape and their representations in both Western (especially North American) and non-Western cultural and artistic traditions, addressing such resonant concepts as ecology, sustainability, nativism, and climate change.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 329 Fashion in the Avant-Garde 3.00 credits
Explores the role of fashion in modern and avant-garde art movements from the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. The course will begin with the Aesthetic Dress and Dress Reform movements and their connections to the Pre-Raphaelites in England and the Secessionists in Vienna. Considering ways that designers engaged with and influenced artistic movements and trends, the course will examine the role of fashion in Cubism, Constructivism, Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism. Looking at designs of the Wiener Werkstätte and designers such as Mario Fortuni, Paul Poiret, Sonia Delaunay, Varvara Stepanova, Lyubov Popova, Coco Chanel, Elizabeth Hawes, and Elsa Schiaparelli, the course will consider a wide range of themes including utopianism in dress, collaboration between artists and designers, and issues of gender within modernism.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 332 History of Photography 3.00 credits
Surveys of the development of photography from its prehistory through the present day. It includes an examination of the interrelationships between photography and other arts, the effect of technology on the photographic image, the tradition of the popular photograph, as well as the study of major photographers and photographic movements.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 336 Baroque Art in Italy 3.00 credits
Examines the art and architecture of Italy from the 1560s to the 1670s, exploring the work of such major figures as Barocci, Annibale Carracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, Pietro da Cortona as well as Nicholas Poussin and Claude Lorrain, both of whom spent most of their lives in Italy. Students will focus largely on artists working in Rome who, during the seventeenth century, produced some of the most influential images, monuments, styles and genres in the history of Western art.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 340 Islamic Art History 3.00 credits
An overview of the development of Islamic art and architecture. Lectures and discussions focus on the evolution of mosque architecture and calligraphy and on important regional centers.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 341 History of Graphic Design 3.00 credits
Aims to make designers literate about their own discipline and help them understand the connections between design and a broader history of objects and ideas. Students are exposed to a wide array of images as well as a broad range of reading materials, including primary texts by designers and cultural critics. The course focuses on 20th-century design in Europe and the United States.

AH 345-TH Art History and its Methods 3.00 credits
The practice of art history has never been monolithic; its methods, its goals, and its underlying assumptions are inevitably diverse. This course is designed for students with some art historical experience, and traces the development of art history as a discipline, closely examining some of the field’s more influential methods, including formalism, iconographic analysis, reception theory, feminism, and structuralism.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 348 Medieval Art and Architecture 3.00 credits
Offers a generally chronological overview of European medieval art and architecture, with side glances at the influences of Byzantium and Islam. Through a series of period-based lectures and discussions of relevant primary documents, students gain a flexible, fluent knowledge of primary works made between 300 and 1348 CE. Secondary readings will also suggest a variety of applicable methods, and two visits to The Walters Art Museum will allow students to view original works and to consider the difficulties of treating medieval art outside of its original context.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 350 History of Illustration 3.00 credits
Traces the concept of illustration as narrative art beginning with Lascaux cave paintings and working down through to contemporary times. Students look at visual storytelling and the cultural, social, political, and technological issues that shaped—and were shaped by—this terribly vital art form. Examples such as Egyptian papyri, illuminated manuscripts, Renaissance painting, moveable type and the development of printmaking (Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya), Art Nouveau and the rise of the poster, the Golden Age of American Illustration and the rise of magazine ephemera, and graphic novels and contemporary approaches to storytelling and mass production are studied.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 352 Wrld Prehistoric Art & Culture 3.00 credits
Addresses world prehistory; that is, the period from the rise of hominids in Africa to the development of complex cultures c. 3000 BC (“mankind’s first three million years”). This era represents the vast majority of humanity’s experience here on earth, yet most people know very little about it. Some of humankind’s most important intellectual breakthroughs occurred in prehistory: the development of social systems and subsistence strategies that made human beings the most resilient, adaptable, and ultimately dominant species on the planet; the manipulation of natural materials to make tools and other objects (“material culture”); the creation of symbolic systems of communication and complex representation (language, writing, and “art”); the development of plant and animal domestication, and of complex and hierarchical social systems (“civilization”).

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 358 History of Modern Design 3.00 credits
Surveys the last three centuries of the development of modern utilitarian and decorative design. It provides for the examination of the rich legacy of craft production and the creative use of newer materials, from the beginning of the Industrial Revolution to the rise of modernism, and the pluralism of today. The course investigates the often contested duality between artist and artisan within the Western tradition of the visual arts, the relationship of design and mechanization, technology, environmental responsibility, individual needs, the design reforms and the role of standards for design, and the expression of social values, including the concept of “good” design and popular culture.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 360 History of African Art Cont. 3.00 credits
Surveys the work of African artists from diverse situations, locations and generations. Overall, the course expands beyond the History of African American art by offering an introduction to major issues in art, art history and visual culture by engaging the aesthetic, social, cultural and geopolitical complexities of African heritage. Topics include the emergence of the modern world, dynamics of colonization and slavery, and, later, artworks by Americans of African heritage between c. 1400 and 1950 CE. Artworks are considered as actively making individuals, communities and societies. Then the course continues the conversation through focus on contemporary Africana art since 1950 to the present. Specific reference is made to American artists of the past 60 years, and the course draws on a wide range of examples to see various issues and ideas in Africana visual history, including the categories and names, including the difference between traditional and contemporary art.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 363 Modern Craft: Western Ceramics 3.00 credits
Examines the history and theory of modern craft though a study of ceramic artists and movements, primarily from Europe and America. From the Orientalists and Adelaide Robineau to today's expanded formats, this course will consider the radical changes that ceramics has experienced since the late-19th century. Students are provided with a chronological overview of more than a century of ceramics occurring within art, design, and architecture, but will also consider the field's links to other crafts. Time will be reserved for discussions on the consequence of socioeconomic, political, philosophical, and industrial influences as drivers of change.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 365 Contemporary Practice in Print 3.00 credits
At the same time that information is increasingly delivered by pixel rather than ink, printed matter has become the defining visual language of the industrial world. How can print be dead when it is literally everywhere one looks? In this context, the art world has witnessed a new print revival. This course explores the current state of art in print and the various parallel communities that support the creation of printed art and self-publication. Also, this course will also focus on the critical implications of new technologies, including discussion of the implications of an increasingly digital culture for artists.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 366 History of Animation 3.00 credits
Explores the history of animation from its beginnings to the present, and the social, artistic, and political contexts in which those films were created.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 369 Cubism 3.00 credits
Examines key phases of the movement’s evolution as well as related styles in Europe and the United States. The importance of new mediums, including collage and assemblage, are considered along with contemporaneous critical attitudes about Cubism and its relationship to abstraction.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 370 Problems in Contemporary Art 3.00 credits
Students examine a series of case studies in recent artistic production, generally organized around a common theme; the central theme varies from year to year and instructor to instructor.

Prerequisite: AH 201 or Graduate/ Post-Bac standing

AH 375 Arts of Native America 3.00 credits
Explores prehistoric through contemporary art of North American native peoples. Focus is on the perspective of the artists and their culture.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 376 Modern Architecture & Urbanism 3.00 credits
Introduces modern architecture and urban planning, with a focus on those instances when the dialogue between the two professions was at its most fruitful and productive. Some topics include Haussmann’s transformation of Paris, Cerda, Gaudi, and the Eixample, Burnham, the City Beautiful, and the Chicago School, the Garden City Movement and its legacy, Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie School, the Bauhaus, the Futurists, and the Russian Constructivists, CIAM and the International Style, Rossi’s Neo-Rationalism, and Venturi’s Postmodernism. Time is also reserved for a discussion of contemporary ideas about architecture and urban planning, including the “New Urbanism,” of Duany and Plater-Zyberk, the “Posturbanism” of Rem Koolhaas, and the “Everyday Urbanism” of Venturi and his disciples. The class concludes with a survey of contemporary strategies for sustainable architecture and development.

Prerequisite: AH 201 or Graduate/ Post-Bac standing

AH 379-TH Contmp Architectural Criticism 3.00 credits
Presents a selected range of topics in contemporary architectural theory and criticism. Diverse answers to the question ‘What is Architecture?’ will be discussed from a historical perspective, as well from the perspective of current debates. Examining key readings in architecture and in theoretically related areas, students will learn to contextualize design questions, cross reference written texts with works of architecture, and to articulate their own design positions in written form.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 380 Art & Arch.of Mesoamerica 3.00 credits
Pre-Columbian Mexico and Mesoamerica was host to the earliest complex art-producing societies in the Americas. Unified by regional traditions but distinct in cultural identity, these cultures are represented, archaeologically, by some of the most world-renowned and aesthetically sophisticated art and architecture. The course focuses on the cultures of the Olmec, Teotihuacan, the Maya, and the Aztec, but peripheral polities are also examined.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 388 Intro to Curatorial Studies 3.00 credits
Introduces and engages students in the consideration and observation of the broad spectrum of exhibition and presentation possibilities in the context of the larger art world, as well as introduce important practical skills associated with exhibition development and execution, art handling, and art presentation.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 390 History of Film 3.00 credits
An overview of film history. Among the topics covered are the prehistory of cinema in the 19th century; the early emergence of narrative and documentary forms; the growth of silent film as a popular art form; the influence of Soviet montage and German expressionism; the conversion to sound cinema; the rise of such movements as the French New Wave, the American avant-garde, and revitalized Asian cinema; and such contemporary trends as “indie” cinema, digital filmmaking, and computer animation. Weekly film screenings are required in addition to regular class sessions.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 391 Topics in Curatorial Studies 3.00 credits
Synchronizes its content and assignments to correspond with a developing exhibition and/or curatorial project. Students will investigate and consider curatorial theory while navigating curating practicalities. Contingent on corresponding exhibitions or projects, students may have the opportunity to engage directly with research, ancillary programming, exhibition design, and/or artwork. This course allows students and instructors to take advantage of local exhibitions, curatorial projects or thematic investigations relative to curatorial practices.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 395 Archive/Gallery/Museum Prac. 3.00 credits
Designed to provide students with professional development in the field of art history. Field trips and guest speakers will introduce students to a variety of archival sources and help students gain professional knowledge regarding academic, museum, and gallery settings. Students will also draft applications to graduate school and help develop programming for the lunchtime speaker series, Art@Lunch.

Prerequisite: AH 201 or Graduate/ Post-Bac standing

AH 403 20th Cent. Latin American Art 3.00 credits
Explores the emergence of the Latin American aesthetic in the art of the 19th and 20th centuries within the context of cultural nationalism. Examines the pre-Hispanic and African heritage, the colonial past, as well as political and religious themes in Latin American art and their relationship to European and North American cultures.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 405 Exhibition Development Seminar 3.00 credits
Examines the curatorial process through the research, planning and production of a major exhibition. Students serve as curators, designers and educators as they develop and implement proposals for the exhibit’s graphic and exhibit designs, interpretive texts, public programs, community outreach, website, publications, and public relations strategy. Fall semester is devoted to the conceptualization and development of the artistic, design and educational components for the exhibition in spring semester. Enrollment in both semesters (Fall: AH 405- Art History elective; Spring: EX 405- studio elective in your major) is required. Open to undergrad and graduate students in all majors by permission of the instructor only.

AH 412 Metaphor Aspects Contemp Art 3.00 credits
An introduction to contemporary art using a private collection of resource materials constructed as a series of “art historical combines” to be disseminated using a wiki website. These “ah combines” are seminar-specific, multidimensional, and cumulative — each focusing on artists/critics documented since the 1960s whose writings, artworks, and working methods demonstrate specific principles appropriate for the aesthetic development of all. Depicts contemporary art as an investigation into the nature of art, the metaphoric process, and the crucial involvement of the audience. Emphasis is on co-operative interactivity – creative collaboration as the catalyst for each student to construct an end-of-semester “curatorial exposition” representing significant issues in contemporary art. The course procedure aligns conceptually and practically with radical thinking in accordance with the work of Walter Benjamin, André Malraux, Harald Szeemann, Lucy Lippard, Harold Bloom, Dave Hickey, Susan Sontag, Azar Nafisi, Gilles Deleuze, Roland Barthes along with many other cultural critics/artists who have encouraged the individualization of our history of art to enhance the future of art.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 414 Turning Nature into Art 3.00 credits
Examines art from around the world and across time in the context of materials, fabrication and labor. In art production, processes and labor are often little understood, and in today’s “fabrication on demand” culture, they may even become invisible. Yet in many cases, although the way in which materials are expressed and our way of valuing and categorizing objects may evolve, the processes are often the same. Students will meet regularly in the classroom and at the Walters Art Museum, where they will meet with curators and conservators, as they examine case studies across the collection. Issues examined will include marketing and the secrets of the atelier system, colonialism, environmental and conservation concerns, and shifting designations of the categories of art and artifacts.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 423 Istanbul: Art, Modernity, City 3.00 credits
Explores Istanbul as a site of global modernity between the nineteenth century and the present day. This course addresses not only the physical changes in the city itself, but also the literature, art, and film that were produced in dialogue with the fluctuating cityscape. Throughout the course, students investigate different definitions of modernity while studying the following historical topics: Ottoman and Orientalist photography, literature, and exhibitions; urbanism and public space as the showcase of the modern nation-state; filmic representations of social and political change in the city; and gentrification and Istanbul’s rise to the status of “global city” since the 2000s. In short, this course engages with the specific dynamics of Turkey’s cultural history, while also focusing on the transnational context of the world at large.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 429 Modern/Contemp. Chinese Art 3.00 credits
Explores artistic development in China from the mid-twentieth century to the present. This was a period during which the art world in China underwent substantial change, first adjusting to a state-organized system for the production of art after the Communist Party took control of the country and then acclimated to the international art scene after China opened up to the global economy in the 1980s. Students will examine the political beliefs that shaped art in China from the founding of the PRC in 1949 to the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. Then will study the various ways Chinese artists have responded to (or resisted) the global art world since the 1980s.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 430 Making Medieval Books 3.00 credits
Throughout the Middle Ages illuminated manuscripts were one of the most important vehicles for the development and transmission of visual ideas. This course provides a survey of European manuscript production from the early medieval period through the late Gothic era, and touches on the early history of printed books. Students learn about the lavish miniatures found in deluxe manuscripts and examine the ornamental treatment of the text, including display script, illuminated initials, colored parchment, and marginalia. Manuscript illumination is discussed in the context of the owners, users, and purchasers of these objects. In addition, students learn about the techniques and materials used to make manuscripts and the binding of medieval books. Includes several trips to the Walters Art Museum to view manuscripts firsthand.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 439 Visualizing the Ottoman Empire 3.00 credits
Surveys an array of Ottoman artistic production, including painting, architecture, photography, museums, and world’s fairs, between 1839–1923. The final eighty years of the Ottoman Empire were shaped by two important historical developments: the Ottoman government’s extensive modernization programs (political, social, and economic) and an explosion of new technologies and forms of visual expression. How did socioeconomic modernization and aesthetic modernism's unfold in the late Ottoman Empire, and what was their relationship?

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 445 Postwar Italian Cinema 3.00 credits
Examines several examples of literary adaptation, reading closely both the literary texts and their cinematic counterparts. Investigates the politics of adaptation, as well as the criteria by which we can evaluate films based on texts as works of art in their own right. Analyzes both the films and the texts that the course covers, focusing on individual authors’ works, as well as how they generate a dialogue between one another.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 449 Modernity, Difference & Power 3.00 credits
Organized around a rotating theme as a seminar for undergraduates and graduate students that addresses questions of power and cultural production through engagement with advanced theory. Interdisciplinary and team taught by faculty from Art History and Humanistic Studies, it will use case studies, readings, site visits, and classroom discussion to help artists more deeply understand the world they live in.

Juniors and Seniors only

AH 453 Race, Space and Place 3.00 credits
Explores twentieth-century American architecture and urban spaces through the critical lens of “race.” This course investigates the hidden and explicit ways in which race has structured the US built environment, and discuss how to use the built environment to understand racial formations, identities, and experiences. Drawing on recent scholarship in architecture, urban studies, geography, history, and race and ethnic studies, students will focus on specific buildings and sites that help them understand the intersections of race, space, and place. The course engages in important questions: How does race shape the built environment? How is race represented in the built environment we live in, and what does this tell us about the experience of identity and difference?

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 455 Reliquaries 3.00 credits
In many cultures, reliquaries have been fashioned to house sacred remains. These objects signify links between past and present, heaven and earth. This seminar will explore aspects of the patronage, production, and functions of reliquaries in medieval Christianity. In addition, the course will consider cross-cultural and contemporary conceptions of reliquaries, including Buddhist and African traditions. Students will develop a broad understanding of the material forms and symbolic associations of reliquaries through a close reading of primary sources and recent scholarly perspectives; in-depth research; and museum visits.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 458 Gods, Graves & Scholars 3.00 credits
Introduces students to field methods in art history and archaeology, but specifically in the context of art, architecture and design practice. The course title is from C.W. Ceram’s classic book, which introduced generations of readers to a romantic view of archaeology. As an optional experience in the second part of the semester, instructors and students will design a research project, built around a Spring Break trip to a significant world archaeological site. Note that students must register for part one (AH 458) before registering for part two (AH458TR).

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 462 Seeing After Freedom 3.00 credits
Focuses on a single question: What is the relationship between Africana experience, seeing, art and freedom? The course addresses artworks, history, aesthetics, and ideas that have pushed beyond the boundaries of "seeing" and "art" as reflections of our political and social worlds. Instead, students address significant work and ideas by image-makers who embody a new art that visualizes in relation to ideals of freedom and democracy now.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 464 Contemp. Asia thru Postcolonl 3.00 credits
Focuses on post-colonialism and cultural theory as the theoretical framework for understanding contemporary culture and art of Asia. The readings of Asia extend beyond the scope of traditional, Eastern, and Oriental perspectives of study. Students look at the difference between the Asian experience, as embodied by personal politics, to the disembodied/dislocated Internet advertisement of Asia-exotica in order to gain a broader understanding of what determines “Asian-ness” and its difference within a cultural situation, and how Asian cultural objects are manifested in a global context.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 467 Visual Culture of 9/11 3.00 credits
Explores how visual regimes in America have changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001. How have cultural producers (artists and architects, photographers, and novelists, graphic novelists and curators) responded to these acts, which were experienced as a collective national trauma in the U.S., one that produced radical changes in the country's dominant political rhetoric and everyday life. Yet, from the outset, 9/11 unfolded as a uniquely visual phenomenon as well as one marked by its immediate social, political and historical effects.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 472 Women in the History of Art 3.00 credits
Explores the role women have played in the visual arts as artists, patrons, critics, and historians. This course is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 498 Art History Senior Thesis I 3.00 credits
Designed to guide students in writing a senior thesis research paper of 20-25 pages. Senior Thesis I focuses on conducting research for and writing an annotated bibliography and a complete first draft of the thesis essay. The goal of the essay is to provide an original argument based on primary- and secondary-source materials. The course will instruct students in library- and archival-research methods, and will help focus their research and writing through in-class workshops and individual meetings with the course instructor and an outside reader.

Prerequisite: AH 201

AH 499 AH Senior Thesis II 3.00 credits
Designed for art history majors to take in the second semester of their senior year, following the Senior Thesis I, AH 498. The course will focus on further revising individual senior theses and preparation for the senior thesis symposium in the spring. Through a series of workshops, class discussions and lectures, students will revise and finalize their thesis papers, write abstracts of their papers, develop a 20-minute symposium presentation based on their thesis, practice public speaking, and organize the art history commencement show.

Prerequisite: AH 498