MICA Commotion

Issue No. 3 (Fall 2016)

Paul Mirel – MICA's Starman

Paul Mirel takes time after his day job at NASA to bring art and science together.

Paul Mirel

Culture of Change

Sondheim winners upend ingrained attitudes surrounding rape.

Sondheim winners Hannah Brancato '07, '11 (Fiber BFA, Community Arts MFA) and Rebecca Nagle '08 (Fiber BFA)

A Conversation with Taha Heydari

Hoffberger alumnus talks about Baltimore and Tehran.

Taha Heydari
Diamonds Light Baltimore, Mina Cheon '99 (LeRoy E. Hoffberger School of Painting M.F.A.)

Light City

A look back at the MICA artists featured in the nation's first large-scale light festival.

Jay Jackson '16 (Business of Art and Design M.P.S.), co-founder of TNP Studios

Up/Start

At MICA, creative thinking is serious business.

Ashley Minner '11 (photo credit: Colby Ware)

Community Arts as a Way of Life

Community Arts alumna contributes her lifelong work in Baltimore's lumbee Indian community while pursuing her PhD.

The inaugural Mayoral Forum on Arts and Culture brought Baltimore City mayoral candidates together to discuss issues specific to the arts and culture community

Citizen Artists

Promoting the political power of creatives.

Video still form Lemonade video

Turning Lemonade into a LibGuide

How a MICA librarian turned a pop culture phenomenon into a learning resource.

Lee Davis (left) with founding director of the Center for Social Design, Mike Weikert '05 (Graphic Design M.F.A.)

One Giant Leap

Social design leaders discuss the way forward in this professional frontier.

Cara Ober '05 (Studio Art M.F.A.)

Changes in Baltimore

An essay by Cara Ober '05, editor-in-chief, BmoreArt.

We're pleased to share our third issue of Commotion,

a magazine produced twice each year to share ideas, news, and of course, art—all that emerges from the 19 graduate programs here at MICA. The name Commotion comes from our belief that artists and designers create by a process of exploration, an investigative method that by its nature can be chaotic, noisy, and sometimes uncomfortable. The best work often starts with sparring ideas, a creative mind that is deliberating multiple media and solutions, and even a state of confusion. Sometimes, artists embrace this tumult, intentionally disrupting the expected to bring attention to new ideas or to begin conversations. Sometimes, designers are deliberately brought to situations to rethink and disrupt in order to energize.