Student Designers

Participating artists each present their own unique visions, claiming fashion should be recognized as a cultural phenomenon, not just a few voices speaking for an industry. As a student-driven event, R.I.P. V.I.P. demonstrates young artists are a crucial part of the discussion.

Miranda Taylor ’13 (fiber) – Bridle

About Miranda

Miranda TaylorMiranda Taylor grew up in small city in Eastern Pennsylvania in a single parent home giving her an unusual perspective on life, family, and gender roles. Miranda’s journey from being homeless with her Mother and two siblings, to her attendance at MICA, has taken her through the polarity between the highs and lows in life. Miranda believes that these experiences have been unwittingly fortunate. The unusual experiences provide Miranda with the skill to candidly explore unconventional issues and traditional situations and then interpret or reinvent their meaning so they are accessible to different viewers and, in some cases, to “break down barriers”. Miranda’s study in painting and sculpture contribute to the unusual depth of design and perspective of her garments. Her fashion is expressed through a wide variety of media and technique. Miranda currently resides in Baltimore, Maryland where she is a BFA candidate in Fibers with a concentration in Experimental Fashion at MICA, graduating in May.

About Bridle

In Bridle Miranda Taylor aims to remind the individual of the reasoning behind the ritualistic act of marriage. Focusing on the female role within this ritual, Taylor will question the act of giving one’s freedom and personal identity to another, and explore why women encourage other women to give themselves to another person. Taylor emphasizes the normalcy American citizens—specifically women—place in this sacrificial ritual, which she believes is laced with hypocrisy. To navigate herself through the understanding of others, as well as her own marital hypocrisy, Taylor will give herself to her fiancé during R.I.P. V.I.P. This marriage will allow Taylor to show the full gambit of the hypocritical nature of marriage, not just in her own wedding but for all women of the 21st century. All the garments worn by Taylor’s wedding party and officiant were designed, patterned and stitched by Taylor.