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Humanistic Studies Course List (2012-13)

View titles & descriptions for the Humanistic Studies department's courses.

Click a Course's Title to read its description .

Course # Course Title Credits
CWRT 100 Academic Writing Wkshp 1.5 credits
Based on the dual premise that writing is a form of thinking on paper, and—like painting or sculpture—a written piece is a “made thing,” requiring structural integrity and thoughtful, original use of materials (in this case, language). Students analyze a wide range of writing, including their own, and experiment with different structural and organizational strategies, sentence-level revision techniques, research methods, and the nitty-gritty of achieving a tight, powerful final draft. Required of all incoming students. A waiver is possible for students with acceptable transfer credit or after Critical Inquiry/Art Matters faculty assessment of an academic writing sample. Students for whom the workshop is required will take a total of three elective credits.
CWRT 101 Language of Artists I 3 credits
Please contact department for course description.
CWRT 105 Language of Artists II 3 credits
Please contact department for course description.
CWRT 209 Genre: Intro Creative Writing 3 credits
In this course we will write poems, stories, essays, and scripts. We will focus on the fundamental elements of a variety of genres, learning from the examples of a spectrum of prose writers, poets and dramatists. In-class exercises and assignments will encourage us to experiment with character and scene development, narrative strategies, dialogue, point of view, autobiography, time and space, poetic compression, form, and the documentary practices of journalism. Our work will familiarize us with the many ways writers turn experience into expression and form into meaning. Visiting guest writers may offer observations of their respective crafts. In addition to in-class exercises and workshop critiques of student work, assigned readings will develop awareness of historical contexts and innovations. Required for all LLC Creative Writing minors and for all intermediate and advanced writing workshops.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

CWRT 226 Introduction to Poetry 3 credits
This course introduces the initiate poet to the basic poetical forms and the tradition of poetry in America in English. However, it focuses on developing the student’s facility to think critically and use language in ever more innovative ways as a transferable strategy to engaging creativity as a process. The POETRY SPEAKS text and compact disc set of readings and the HANDBOOK OF POETIC FORMS are required reading along with selected local and contemporary poets’ work. Requirements include portfolio assignment poems, one analytical peer essay review, one analytical essay based on assigned texts and two copies of a ten-page chapbook of original poetry to be celebrated at two required public readings with classmates.
CWRT 248 Pop Culture Journalism 3 credits
A writing course focused on the craft of popular-culture journalism, that genre of newspaper/magazine reporting that covers art, music, film, theater, and the cultural "scene". Students will complete a portfolio of three types of stories: a review, a profile, and a feature. Each assignment will have three component parts: a written pitch, a draft copy and a ready-for-publication revision. The class will be run primarily as a workshop, but will also include guest speakers--A&E reporters, critics, and editors from the City Paper, The Sun, and a lifestyle magazine (Baltimore or Style).

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

CWRT 281 Wrting Childrens Picture Books 3 credits
So you want to make a children's picture book? Great. This course will help you develop your text. But as we begin reading children's books (and books about children's books), writing manuscripts, and sharing them with each other, we will quickly encounter some challenging questions. What is this book for? Who is it for? Does it appeal to children and adults in different ways? What assumptions does it make about the world of childhood and the relationships children have? How does it obscure, reveal, comment on, or attempt to change the truths of life—things like love, desire, satisfaction, hurt, difference, sickness, and death? What values or norms does it establish—or subvert? Do the words and pictures reinforce one another or is there tension between them, and to what effect? What values or expectations are at stake as the story or pattern unfolds? Assignments include analyzing a children's book or books, reading books with children, emulating a specific author, reworking an old story, and developing an original story or concept. We will discuss both text and illustration in published picture books, but the creative assignments and workshop discussions will focus on the text component. Ideally, each student will conclude the semester with a manuscript that is ready for illustration.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

CWRT 322 Screenwriting Workshop 3 credits
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Prerequisite: One Writing course at the 200-level or above, or Permission of Instructor (includes L 209, 226, 227, 240, 254, 268, 275, 281, 289, 304, 309, 322, 326, 330, 365, 380, 403, 406, 407, and 456).

CWRT 326 Intermediate Poetry Workshop 3 credits
This poetry writing course utilizes a blend of ancient text including the Persian The Green Sea of Heaven: 50 Ghazals from the Diwan of Hafiz and contemporary text that includes Laughing Blood by New York visual artist and poet David Colosi and the recently released Alone With the Terrible Universe by Baltimore’s Alan Britt. It also includes a workbook with varied writing exercises and samples. To enlarge your poetic possibilities, the Persian text offers concepts and methodologies for innovation that are not western. There are tentative plans for the two Euro-American poets in the assigned reading to visit class. Essentially, you are working to expand your range of innovation in creating poems, using your analysis of the assigned reading and doing peer critiques to improve your critical revising eye. Grade requirements include writing 10 original poems, one analytical essay, creating 2 copies of one chapbook of original poetry, giving 2 public readings and a number of minor in-class assignments.
CWRT 330 The Contemporary Memoir 3 credits
Surveys some of the successes and scandals in contemporary memoir, focusing on the use of both writing and reading in dealing with personal pain, dysfunction, and disaster. In addition to weekly and ongoing creative writing assignments, students read from the following list: This Boy’s Life by Tobias Wolff; The Diving Bell and the Butterfly by Bauby; The Kiss by Katherine Harrison; The Liars’ Club by Mary Karr; A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers; Secret Life by Michael Ryan; Experience by Martin Amis; Permanent Midnight by Jerry Stahl; and Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen. Critical reaction to and reviews of these works are also read and discussed.

Prerequisite: One Writing course at the 200-level or above, or Permission of Instructor (includes L 209, 226, 227, 240, 254, 268, 275, 281, 289, 304, 309, 322, 326, 330, 365, 380, 403, 406, 407, and 456).

CWRT 333-TH Hypertexts 3 credits
This workshop centered course focuses on the practice and direct use of technology in composing original works of poetry, fiction and/or non-fiction. Through examining the use of words, images, and sounds in hypermedia and hypertext works, students will explore the relationship between conventional literary forms and emergent digital media. Hypertext theory challenges the author to abandon conventional ideas of center, margin, and linearity and invites one to consider connectedness, decenteredness, and the possibilities of multi-linear narrative. Readings will include works of writers, theorists, artists, and practitioners such as Shelley Jackson, George Landow, Michel Foucault, Robert Coover, Michael Joyce, Stuart Moulthrop, and Jean Baudrillard, as well as a broad range of visual artists actively engaged in using computerized images in their works. In order for students to fully gain a working knowledge of hypertext, they will be expected to create a series hypertext documents. Additionally, they will complete two hypertext projects: a smaller introductory work and a larger culminating piece.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

CWRT 403 Advanced Creative Writing 3 credits
The advanced topics courses offer students opportunities to go deeply into a particular genre. Where the emphasis in introductory and intermediate writing workshops is on exploration, experiment and on developing a critical sensibility, the advanced courses invite a commitment to a specific body of work: a collection of poems; personal or critical essays; a novella or collection of short stories. Each semester faculty teaching these courses will offer specific, focused topics for their particular course.

Prerequisite: One Writing course at the 200-level or above, or Permission of Instructor (includes L 209, 226, 227, 240, 254, 268, 275, 281, 289, 304, 309, 322, 326, 330, 365, 380, 403, 406, 407, and 456).

CWRT 404 Writing for Theatre 3 credits
Designed for students who want to experience the immediacy of theater, this workshop offers participatory experiences in scene writing, improvisation, and acting. Other activities include readings of student work and analysis of selected plays. The course culminates in a workshop production of scenes, monologues, and performances written and staged by students.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

CWRT 406 One Act Workshop 3 credits
This course is designed for students who have studied theatre and drama and who want to write plays. The worship focuses on giving the students the tools and experience to write short plays. In addition to playwriting exercises, students see a play, meet with a visiting director, attend a visiting playwrights panel, read interview with playwrights, and analyze short plays by modern and contemporary playwrights. Staged readings of the students' one-act plays are performed throughout the semester.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

CWRT 426 Advanced Poetry Workshop 3 credits
“Poetic” describes the sublime accomplishment in all the arts. Poetry is the sister art of painting, and the urge to appreciate, study, and make poetry is a traditional and natural desire of the visual artist. This class is for experienced poets, a forum to uncover and gratify the desire for poetry in our lives. Students read the work of accomplished poets and write and critique the work of themselves and other members of the class.

Prerequisite: One 300- level writing course (CWRT 322, 326, 330,365, or PERF 380) or Permission of Instructor

CWRT 467 Creative Non-Fiction Wkp 3 credits
Those who work in the genre of creative nonfiction recognize that writing can be creative while using factual materials. This course focuses on learning and refining the craft of creative nonfiction through the development of personal narratives. Students work on refining the traditional techniques of journalism and reportage, while maintaining a strong and special individuality, and a singularly distinctive voice. They read a series of essays that which all possess this unique subjectivity of focus, concept, context, and point of view, and analyze the way in which information is presented and defined. The final project includes the completion of a longer narrative or a series of shorter narratives.

Prerequisite: One Writing course at the 200-level or above, or Permission of Instructor (includes L 209, 226, 227, 240, 254, 268, 275, 281, 289, 304, 309, 322, 326, 330, 365, 380, 403, 406, 407, and 456).

CWRT 468 Adv.Cr.Writng: Writing History 3 credits
Histories are great stories, and there's no better way to learn about the past (and the difficulty of interpreting it) than to try to tell one of its stories fully, accurately, and with narrative drive. Students will read and discuss a broad range of narrative histories, each with its own way of framing problems, presenting evidence, building credibility, structuring narrative, and delivering a good read. In the first half of the course students will experiment with a variety of writing techniques, and in the second half they will pursue an in-depth independent research and writing project with an optional visual component. Pre-requisite: a 300-level writing workshop or permission of instructor.
FA 303 The Play's the Thing 3 credits
3 credits. Shipley. offered spring. Studio component of PERF 303.

Concurrent enrollment L 303 required, totalling 6 credits. Enrollment by permission of Instructor

FLMM 211 New Wave Cinema 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Focuses on the French New Wave, paying attention to what the critic Jonas Mekas calls the “American New Wave,” and considering the concept of the auteur and how this manifests itself in editing, subject matter, mise-en-scene, and other aspects of filmmaking. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

FLMM 237 Horror Movies 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Examines the origins and development of horror cinema over the last century, with attention paid to a variety of periods including German Expressionism, American 50s horror, Gore, Japanese horror, and conceptual horror. The class looks at a variety of filmmakers from Murnau and Wiene to Warhol, Carpenter, and Nakata, to see how genre concerns are balanced with the director’s aesthetic prerogative. Students study films within cultural contexts to see how horror films are frequently a reflection of social concerns, and investigate the fine line between camp and genre excellence. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

FLMM 247 B Movies 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. The term “B movie” has taken on numerous definitions in recent years—some equate the phrase with “camp,” others with “cult,” and others with “inexpensive.” This class explores the origins of the B-movie as a marketing tool and its evolution into a film-type with a rough set of criteria. Aesthetic and historical examinations of films by Roger Corman, Orson Welles, Sam Raimi, as well as so-called “anonymous” directors are examined. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

FLMM 274 Women's Novels into Men's Film 3 credits
Many novels by female writers have been adapted to the screen, providing an important way for women to enter the male-dominated discourse of mainstream cinema, even though the movies based on their work are usually directed by men. This course examines novels, stories, and films in the traditionally “feminine” genre of melodrama, employing gender theory, adaptation theory, genre theory, and auteur theory. Works studied may include “Make Way for Tomorrow” (Lawrence/McCarey, 1937), “Jane Eyre” (Brontë/Stevenson, 1943), “Imitation of Life” (Hurst/Sirk, 1959), “The Birds” (Du Maurier/Hitchcock, 1963), “Wise Blood” (O’Connor/Huston, 1979), “The Color Purple” (Walker/Spielberg, 1985), “The Age of Innocence” (Wharton/Scorsese, 1993), and “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire” (Sapphire/Fletcher, 2009).

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

FLMM 313-TH Thinking Through Cinema 3 credits
3 credits. Aziz. Offered occasionally. The course is aimed at re-evaluating the normative concepts and values regarding the body and its complex relationship with space as found in classic texts of modern architectural theory. Students will begin with a study and analysis of the OEsensory motor function¹ that informs the dynamics between body and space in Deleuze¹s theory of cinema. The critical terms from this investigation will then be used to examine the assumptions about the body & space in works of literature, art, film and architecture.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

FLMM 355-TH Reality, Illusion, Moving Imag 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Through extensive screenings, readings, and discussions, this course explores the continually shifting and elusive boundary between reality and illusion in film, video, installation, and animation; identifies the ways in which the moving image constructs fantasy or reveals its self-reflexive nature, using as a theoretical framework key texts and concepts from the fields of aesthetics, semiotics, and ethics. Explorations include the structural components that connote a space of “fantasy” or “verism” and a meditation on the social dynamic that generates or bridges the distances between self and other. Our examination will be expansive and generous, ranging from Hollywood classics like Singing in the Rain to the recent emergence of the indie mumblecore movement, to documentaries, to the new realm of YouTube, and to experimental video and film. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

FLMM 356 Film as Art: 3 credits
3 credits. Sterritt. Offered occasionally. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature or one IH1 or IH2 course.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

FLMM 410 The Invisible-Visible Truth 3 credits
The 20th century was not only the most brutal century in the history of the humanity, but it was also a century during which the last great ideological utopia sank in perdition. Out of all documentarians, for good and for bad, the name of Joris Ivens has become synonymous with the documentary project of the 20th century. This course simulates a three-dimensional journey into Ivens' breathtaking 62 year filmic overture and panoramic exposition of his filmic enterprise. In 1988, at 90 years of age and literary on his death bed, Ivens created his filmic-epitaph: 'A Tale of the Wind', a declared philosophical and transcendental journey into the heart of the invisible spirit of China. Throughout the course, we will ask ourselves what this personal account and filmic odyssey can (or rather should) teach us about ourselves and about our enterprise in the 21st century.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

FLMM 412 Gender in Film 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Provides an introduction to gender as a critical tool for film analysis. Students watch films of various genres, different historical periods, and cultural backgrounds. In addition to analyzing and discussing film as cultural creation, the class reads essays on film theory and cinematic production and pays particular attention to the constructions and representations of concepts such as femininity and masculinity, and to racialized, classed, and sexualized representations of otherness as they intersect with gender in film. The course also provides students with the scholarly vocabulary needed to critically engage with and write about film. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

HIST 220-IH1 History of the Middle East 3 credits
Surveys the long history of the Middle East with special attention to the 20th century, including the Arab-Isaeli conflict, the fragmentation of Lebanon, the rise of religious fundamentalism, the struggles for power, and the Gulf War. In the first half of the 20th century, the Middle East has become a region of great interest and importance, not only because of its oil resources, but also as a focal point for the cold war and other conflicts.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

HIST 226-IH1 Urban History: Pre-Industrial 3 credits
3 credits. Sizer. offered occasionally. City living is literally synonymous with civilization: the root of the word civilization is the Latin word civis, meaning city. This course will trace the history of urban life back to its origins in the Middle East, to understand the roots of urban culture, its meaning, its significance, its varieties. This investigation will combine studies of particular cities: what they looked like, their inhabitants, their rituals, but will also engage in an extensive look at theories of what cities are and how they have shaped the mentalities of those dwelling in them. Is there an urban personality? Are cities the zones of cultural and artistic dynamism? Do cities create freedom or restrictions on human life? What are the environmental impacts of cities? For their semester-long project, each student will select one particular city on which he/she will focus: possibilities include Rome, Delhi, Beijing, Babylon, Jerusalem, Alexandria, Paris, Tenochtitlan/Mexico City, and many others.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

HIST 245-IH1 The Black Death in Hist & Lit 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. In 1348, the disease that would be called the Black Death swept west from Central Asia to Europe, where it quickly annihilated up to a third of Europe’s population in the span of one short year. This was neither the first nor the last occurrence of this dread disease in world history. The effects of the plague on the social fabric of the societies with which it came into contact were considerable, but so were the psychic effects, and the intellectual and artistic worlds felt compelled to attempt to understand what the plague was, as well as its grander philosophical and moral implications. This course studies some of those efforts, with discussions of readings from Boccaccio, Defoe, Villon, Camus, danse macabre and grotesque literature, artistic responses, and the necessary social background of the Black Death and theories about the impact of disease in history from writers such as William McNeill, Jared Diamond, and others. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

HIST 251-IH2 Arch.&Soc. Hist. of Baltimore 3 credits
HST 251-IH2 Architectural and Social History of Baltimore 3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. In many ways Baltimore is a microcosm of the growth of the United States. The opening of the B&O Railroad linked the vast agricultural areas of the Midwest to the Port of Baltimore and the Atlantic trade system. Baltimore lay at the heart of the industrial revolution. Architecture is perhaps the art form that most closely records the economic, demographic, and political record of a city. This is especially true of Baltimore’s architecture—its churches, factories, harbors, and neighborhoods. This class explores Baltimore’s history, using architecture as a roadmap of its development. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

HIST 280-IH2 Civilization & its Discontents 3 credits
For the 10000 years since human beings first started living in complex societies, civilization has had its supporters and its detractors. For some, being human necessarily means striving to create, to build, to order, to civilize. Others have attempted to reject or critique civilization by returning to the wilderness and celebrating the natural over the constructed world. In all, defining the civilized has been a fundamental part of to defining the modern. This course will investigate and interrogate the intellectual history of the concept of civilization, reading both those who have sought to define and celebrate it, and those who have, in some way, rejected it. Readings and topics may include: the pros and cons of the Agricultural Revolution, Early Christian wilderness saints, medieval Wildman legends, Norbert Elias's "Civilizing Process," Freud's "Civilization and its Discontents," living 'off the grid' and John Krakauer's "Into the Wild."

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

HIST 320-TH Crowds, Riots, & Mass Society 3 credits
HST 320-TH Crowds, Riots, and the Mass Society All historical societies have routinely described collective groups of people as primary actors in political and community life. Current politicians invoke "the American people”; pollsters and historians speak of a community's public opinion; medieval chronicles and modern newspapers alike describe scenes of mass hysteria, the dangerous rabble, and other similar manifestations of a sort of collective will. This class discusses the phenomenon of crowds, riots, and the mass and the various theories that have been developed to explain them. Topics include: theorizations of the crowd and the collective, mass hysteria and fear, demonstrations, sociological/mathematical modeling of crowd dynamics, the "flash mob," and the relationship of the individual with mass society. Includes readings from Plato, Marx, Rousseau’s concept of the General Will, Freudian studies of the collective psychology such as Gustave Le Bon, Canetti, contemporary sociological studies, and Existentialist literature, as well as materials from other media such as the 1928 classic film The Crowd, supplemented by field studies of crowds in action and other activities. Prerequisites: One IH1 course and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

HIST 338-TH History, Memory & Imagination 3 credits
3 credits. Orr. Offered occasionally. This course examines the contested nature of historical inquiry and narrative during the past 100 years, addressing a number of central themes: What is the nature of the historian’s craft, and what is the relationship of historical research and writing to art, literature, and the social sciences? What is the role of moral judgment in historical inquiry, and what ethical duties must historians consider in interpreting the past? What is the nature of historical “truth,” and on what basis does the historian make truth claims? What is the nature of the historical “record,” and what constitutes historical evidence? What is the relationship of theory to historical practice, and has the use of theory enhanced or hindered our understanding of the past? Authors studied will include Herbert Butterfield, Marc Bloch, E. H. Carr, G. R. Elton, Hayden White, Quentin Skinner, Roger Chartier, and Richard J. Evans. Prerequisites: One IH1 course and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

HIST 340 Mass Media & Contemporary Wrld 3 credits
3 credits. Merrill. Offered Spring. An intensive study of the history of public relations, propaganda, and the rise of mass media, this course will also undertake an "alternative" history of recent world events. In a seminar or project-style class, we will analyze media coverage of the Middle East and the region's relations with the United States (e.g., terrorism) as a way of coming to an understanding of such media outlets as the New York Times, TV news programming, NPR, and others. We will measure the news against the actual history. It is often said that totalitarian societies are characterized by high levels of propaganda and control of symbolic productions (expression and the arts). Propaganda is, in fact, a cornerstone of democratic societies. In societies where governments cannot routinely resort to brute force in order to control social policy, they adopt more subtle means of controlling thought, as in George Orwell's "Thought Police." The founder of the public relations industry, Edward Bernays, wrote early in the 20th century that, "The engineering of consent is the very essence of the democratic process." Bill Moyers has called this the creation of a "Public Mind." This class will examine the influence of public relations firms and the US government on news coverage. This course is aimed at those interested in advertising, public relations, or contemporary world history and politics. We will study Bernays and also Chomsky, Naomi Klein, Ewen, Herman, and many others. Students will contribute to an anthology on the nature of mass media in the US. (Note: this class is a revision of L-448 Design of Meaning.)

Undergraduates at the Sophomore level or higher only.

HIST 373-TH Dream Workshop 3 credits
This course will survey theoretical approaches that address what dreams are and what they mean, with an emphasis on Jung and the post-Jungians. We will consider the various forms of dreams – recurring, panic, erotic, the nightmare, lucid, and prophetic – and attempt to illuminate their underlying psychological meaning. Dreams as they have appeared in art, literature, and film will also be explored, as well as daydreams, fantasies, memories, and collective dreams. To complicate our exploration, we will hold the idea in our minds that we don’t know what our dreams are about, and appreciate the presence of loss and mystery in relation to our dreaming life. Students are asked to keep a dream journal throughout the duration of the course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

HIST 408 Print, Memory & Social Order 3 credits
Examines the relationship between the media of print, orality, and manuscript in early modern European society. Themes and issues covered will include the authority of the written word and its relationship to memorial evidence, the relationship of manuscript to the new media of print, and the development of distinctive popular and elite cultures from the 15th thought the 18th centuries. The course also emphasizes the broader question of how these developments affected the changing nature of social relations and the rule of law in pre-modern society. Authors studied include E.P. Thompson, Carlo Ginzberg, Keith Thomas, Paul Seaver, Cynthia Herup, and selected others.
HIST 410 Propaganda: Thought Control 3 credits
It is often said that totalitarian societies are characterized by propaganda and control of symbolic productions, while democratic societies maximize freedom of belief and expression. This class begins with the opposite assertion -- propaganda and thought control are, in fact, the cornerstone of democratic societies. In societies where governments and moneyed elites cannot easily use brute force to control people, they must adopt more subtle means of control, and in the 20th and 21st centuries this has been the control of thought through carefully designed spectacles and constructed meanings of contemporary events. This is not to say that force isn’t used in democratic societies, but an important part of the constructed meaning of “democracy” is that it is not used. While totalitarian societies control bodies, democratic societies control people’s minds. This is the lesson of George Orwell’s 1984. The contest over symbols and meanings in so-called “free or open societies” is therefore more crucial than it is in “closed societies.” Thus, as we will see in this class, public relations and propaganda have merged in the 20th century with news reporting and journalism so that now they are completely indistinguishable, or, to say it another way, most major journalism is in reality public relations. One of the founders of public relations, Edward Bernays, wrote that, “The engineering of consent is the very essence of the democratic process.”

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

HIST 423 French Revolution 3 credits
According to most historians, the modern world was born from the French Revolution. Concepts such as popular opinion and sovereignty, the secular state, the Right and Left division of politics, the belief in change and progress as opposed to tradition and status, and the idea of Revolution itself, are in many ways legacies of the French Revolution of 1789. Because it went through several phases from moderate Republic to the extremism of the Reign of Terror to Napoleon’s popular dictatorship, the Revolution has also become the primary laboratory of theories of history, having been subject to Marxist, Feminist, Freudian, Revisionist and other historical interpretations. This course will review first-hand accounts of the Revolution, political documents, treatises and speeches, and also read several of the various historical interpretations that have tried to understand it, from De Tocqueville, Marx, Lefebvre, Hunt and Furet.
HIST 434 The American Civil War 3 credits
Investigates the political, economic, social, and military aspects of the American Civil War, beginning with an overview of the conditions and events of antebellum America and proceeding to the war itself, observing and analyzing its causes and effects. Covers the chronology of its battles and other events that punctuated the lives of Americans, from politicians to generals, from the common soldier to families left at home, from writers and artist to pundits and scalawags. Finally, the course will explore post-war Reconstruction and the slow and painful beginning of the America we know today. Extensive reading is augmented by lectures, films, demonstrations, and field trips, all of which will culminate in active discussions. Examinations are given and an in-class presentation is required.

Undergraduates at the Sophomore level or higher only.

HMST 101 Critical Inquiry 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered fall, spring. This course asks students to explore the intellectual and aesthetic foundations of their work and the work of others. This calls for a vigorous investigation into the nature, sources, and consequences of personal values (intellectual, moral, formal, philosophical) and such values are invoked in the process of creation and critique. Students are given opportunity to sharpen and extend their ability to articulate their critical responses, both in written and spoken form, reinforcing the essential link between critical thinking and artmaking, and demonstrating the powerfully complementary nature of language as a medium vital to the thoughtful artist.
HMST 105 Intro to Humanistic Studies 3 credits
This foundation elective class is intended for students interested in exploring MICA’s double major in Humanistic Studies and one of the studio majors – those interested in pursuing an integrated and socially concerned program of study in their college career – and beyond. Artists of the 21st century are increasingly multi-disciplinary. They want to be object makers as well as writers and spokespersons for their culture. This class is designed to examine the problems and strategies of working across traditional disciplinary boundaries. It also serves as an introduction to Humanistic Studies and the role of the “public intellectual” in today’s world. It opens the debate on a wide range of issues – historical study, feminism, contemporary philosophy, film, politics, and many more. The discussions in this class will grow out of the most important intellectual crises of the 21st century.
HMST 220 Soph Sem: On Being Human I 3 credits
This is the first required class for majors in Studio Art + Humanistic Studies. It explores the question of what it means to be a human being through a review of concepts developed by thinkers and writers throughout history and in a global context on the problem of human nature. The goals of the course will be to build the students’ analytical reading skills along with substantial experience in research and writing. Readings will include texts in literature, philosophy, history, the sciences, as well as an examination of material productions such as art, architecture, states, and nations. Humanistic Studies majors are to take this course in conjunction with the Spring semester course On Being Human II.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

HMST 230 Soph Sem: On Being Human II 3 credits
The class follows closely on the Fall seminar. The two semesters are actually “serially team taught”; that is, two faculty with different approaches or theoretical frameworks will address essentially the same theme – the human experience. They will consider different historical and cultural configurations. For example, a philosopher might be paired with someone from Literature. The two instructors will work together to prepare their syllabi so that the work over the two semesters is complementary. In both semesters, students will begin to consider professional opportunities for graduates in the humanities and arts.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

HMST 240 Global Persp: Politics/History 3 credits
A sophomore requirement for majors in Studio Art + Humanistic Studies which explores our contemporary world and world events, especially as they relate to the interests of Humanists. This course takes a “non-western” perspective. All readings are by authors, activists, and scholars outside the Euro-American nexus. Its goal will be to bring students up to date on where human development and the progress of societies stand in the 21st century. This class will introduce students to non-western ways of looking at the contemporary world and to the “world systems theory.” It will also consider the media through which so much of the world is represented and understood.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

HMST 320-TH Humanistic Theory I 3 credits
This class is the first Junior level requirement for all Studio Art + Humanistic Studies majors. It looks at social, intellectual, and other theories that are brought to bear on the analysis of culture, especially in the context of the last hundred years or so of work. For example, students may explore the tradition of anti-humanism from Nietzsche to Foucault, or theories of race, feminism, gender, sexuality, or theories of semiotics, language, and meaning. Theoretical explorations into community, political, and economic structures are also be important. Some community involvement may also be required, especially in MICA’s Community Arts Partnership program. Substantial research and writing will be required.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

HMST 330-TH Humanistic Theory II 3 credits
This class follows closely on the Fall semester of Humanistic Theory. Like the sophomore seminars, these two classes are “serially team taught” by two different instructors who bring different perspectives and intellectual frameworks to the subjects of the class. This class will require substantial research and writing and may require some community involvement, especially in MICA’s Community Arts Partnership. Further work in professional development will be required. Students will also work on making connections with the projects they are doing in the studio side of their integrated major.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

HMST 340 Writing in Humanities & Arts 3 credits
Writing is important in all Humanistic Studies classes, but this class takes a practical stance. Students will be asked to write for on-line journals, blogs, discussion forums or student-run professional conferences and journals. They will be introduced to the world of practicing writers, working on areas such as film, book, or art exhibit reviews, and commentaries on current issues. Students will make public presentations of their work in readings, conference-style seminars, and other forums. The goal will be to get students involved in the on-going discussion of contemporary issues and to move them into the role of the “public intellectual” who helps his or her community understand the issues of the times.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

HMST 470 Being Human the Era of Posthum 3 credits
What are the essential qualities of the “being” that the Humanities study? Do they evolve over time and across historical eras? Have we now crossed into a “Posthuman Age” in which qualities such as freedom and dignity are obsolete? The goal of this class is to help students locate the articulation of “being human” in the humanities and arts by addressing directly the issues raised by Posthumanism. We will do this by reading comparatively certain key texts from the period of Renaissance Humanism and from the Posthuman age. For example, Richard Dawkins’ The Selfish Gene might be read against Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments. This class will include both analytical and creative components. The re-definition of “being human” is shaping up to be the great challenge of the 21st century and those who are students today will be the creators of this new definition. This class welcomes Graduate Students.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

HMST 480 Senior Thesis I 3 credits
Fall and Spring of the senior year, will be taught by a single instructor who will serve as the mentor for each student’s senior thesis project. The class will also focus on contemporary issues in Humanistic Studies. This will serve as a culmination of work done at the lower levels. The thesis project will begin very early in the fall with a written proposal by each student. Some students will choose research papers; some will choose an integrated project linking their studio work with their academic work. Students should undertake a major project that grows organically out of their three years of experience at MICA as a combined Studio Art + Humanistic Studies major.
HMST 490 Senior Thesis II 3 credits
Students concentrate on their thesis projects. Class presentations and group critiques will take place as work progresses. All students should work toward a public presentation at the senior show. This can be in the form of a Humanities conference or some other venue developed by the class.
IHST 200-IH1 Intellectual Hst: Anc. Culture 3 credits
The scope and orientation of the class is global, looking at the rise and fall of centers of cultural and humanistic activity and considering as much as possible lines of influence from earlier civilizations to later ones. While some general historical and analytical books will be assigned, the emphasis will be on reading primary sources in their entirety and books that hold something of the status as major or classical contributions to the humanities or human knowledge. The goal of this class is to provide a foundation that can be further developed and explored in upper level courses in art history, literature, and the humanities. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 201-IH1 Strange Peoples: Ethnography 3 credits
An interdisciplinary course informed by history, intellectual history, the visual arts, anthropology, and literature. Observation of “exotic” peoples in order to gain knowledge of humankind is as old as Herodotus. But since the Western encounter with the New World and with non-Western cultures in the Early Modern period, the Western imagination has also turned the anthropological approach to purely artistic ends. This course examines actual travelers’ and explorers’ descriptions of “exotic” cultures, as well as fictional accounts and visual representations of these societies. It traces the development from amateur and ad hoc ethnography to the scientific observations written by modern anthropologists, and also considers the work of artists who have imagined societies that do not exist and who give us a “scientific” report on them. In some cases, it is difficult to distinguish the imaginary account from the true one. In all cases, however, the class discovers what the observer’s statements about the foreign society tell us about our own society. Readings include Herodotus, Captain Cook’s diaries, Melville, Michaux, Kafka, Levi-Strauss, Malinowski, Sahlins, and other works of art, fact, and fiction. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 202-IH1 The Age of Reformation 3 credits
3 credits. Orr. Offered Occasionally. This course examines the different movements initiated for the reform of western Christendom in late medieval and early modern Europe. The course will examine the medieval, scholastic, and renaissance contexts of the reformations of the sixteenth century, as well as the thought of the leading reformers. These will include, not only the major figures of the Protestant Reformation, but also those calling for internal reform from within the Catholic Church. Particular readings will include selections from the writings of such authors as Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Ignatius Loyola, as well as the decrees of the Council of Trent.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 203-IH1 Early Hist. Western Religions 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered Occasionally. This course surveys the rich culture of religions that grew in the eastern Mediterranean, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, in their historical framework. We survey precursor pagan religions in Egypt, Israel, Persia, and Greece before considering the early development of Christianity and Islam. We will examine both the complex world-views of these religious traditions, and the role they played in everyday life, dealing directly with the texts, rituals, and religious symbols. Special attention will be paid in a comparative manner to the development of law derived from religious texts.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 206-IH1 Bandits & Outlaws:Crime/Justic 3 credits
The outlaw is a paradigmatic figure that elicits admiration and fear, sympathy and revulsion, and whose example promotes both subversion and conformism. As a figure that, by definition, is removed from society, the outlaw’s example tests the limits and validity of society’s institutions in the popular mind, and thus outlaw stories have become vital tools for the questioning of authority and institutions for centuries in all societies. Larger issues such as the place of the Individual in the State, the interplay between mainstream and underground culture, crime and punishment and the police, and the limits of community solidarity, can all be addressed through the history of the outlaw.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 207-IH1 Creativity and Genius 3 credits
Does being human have a special meaning related to possessing the power of creation? Does human meaning come from the self’s creative and productive interactions with an external world through art and work? What is the difference between art and work? Are there dangers, both environmental and moral, to a conception of human beings as manipulators of nature? It is these questions, all spinning off of the central issue of humanity’s creative nature, that will be at the core of a new seminar. The different historical/cultural understandings of the relationship of the creative - and creating - self with other objects (nature) and other selves (society), and these differences are connected with a set of larger fundamental questions about the purpose of human life. Beginning with the Prometheus myth, continuing through readings of Mary Shelley, Marx, Arendt, Kant, Joyce, Shakespeare, neuroscientific studies of genius, and ending with student project profiles of a creating person (artist, artisan, or worker), literary, scientific, historical, and other theoretical perspectives will be placed alongside accounts of artistic and working practices of creation - both exceptional and everyday - to provide students with a full range of the ways that different people have understood the meaning of their creative endeavors.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

IHST 208-IH1 Foundations of Western History 3 credits
Investigates major events in the rise of Europe—the Crusades, explorations into new worlds, scientific experimentation, economic innovations, Protestantism—alongside developments in philosophy, the arts, and political thinking. The goal is to gain an understanding of the foundations for what came to be called Modernism. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 209-IH1 Arab & Muslim Intellectual Hst 3 credits
This class will study the vibrant world of Arabs, Turks (Ottomans), Persians, Jews, and North Africans who flourished between 800 AD to 1800 from Spain across North Africa to Iran. As an exploration in intellectual history, we will attempt to understand social and political history through readings in literature, philosophy, and the arts. We will, of course, include some straight history as well, but the emphasis will always be on reading primary texts and works that have gained the status of classics. The period known in European history as the Crusades (1095-1250) is actually the Arab world’s Golden Age of philosophy and literature. The great writers and libraries of the Muslim and Jewish Middle East (which included Spain) provided the intellectual material for the rise of Europe. After the Arabs came the empire of the Ottoman Turks. The class will conclude with the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in the late 1800s and the rise of the Islamic Resurgence or Nationalism in the mid-twentieth century.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 212-IH1 World Systems Before Columbus 3 credits
As most people know, when Columbus set sail in 1492 he was not trying to find the Americas; rather he sought a sea short cut into the vibrant Afro-Asiatic trading system and the center of the world’s wealth and culture at the time. But most people don’t know much about this world cultural center that extended for 1,000 years from the fall of Rome (c. 400) to the rise of Europe (c. 1500) and encompasses the land areas of Africa and Asia, a cultural and economic system centered on the Indian Ocean. This class proposes to explore the intellectual history of the Afro-Asiatic world system that attracted the interest of Europeans and gave them their intellectual and scientific foundations. It includes the empires of Mali and the Ottomans; the rise of Islam and the Islamic World; the Buddhist cultures in S.E. Asia and Japan.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

IHST 214-IH1 Homosexuality and Civilization 3 credits
Throughout the history of civilization, people have perceived same-sex love differently. While in classical Greece man-boy love was considered a socio-economic privilege and tradition, in medieval Europe men and women were burned and hanged for what is now called homosexuality. This intellectual history of homosexuality surveys the period in the West from early Greece to the present and also includes a survey of homosexuality in Imperial China (500 BCE–1849 CE) and pre-Meiji Japan (800 BCE–1868 CE) The class also explores the conjunctions of this history with same-sex love in the visual arts and literature, from ancient Greece and Rome through the Christian Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the Baroque, the Pastoral Elegists, and the Gothic. The class continues with the birth of Modernism, the American Renaissance and Aestheticism, the Decadents, Realists, and Symbolists, the 19th century sexologists, the New Woman, Wilde, and the emerging “queer” culture. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 221-IH1 Myth, Magic and Ritual 3 credits
This course will focus on the origins of western philosophy and the pre-history of superstition and religion, considering the origins and tenets of hermetic belief systems such as alchemy, the occult, kabbalah, freemasonry, and other gnostic traditions and styles of thought.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 224-IH1 Witchcraft and Demonology 3 credits
Addresses the rise and decline of the witch hunt, exploring the underlying social, cultural, and intellectual changes that gave rise to the European and early American “witch craze.” During the period 1450–1750, upwards of 110,000 women and men in Europe alone stood accused of maleficia—of being in league with the devil and practicing “witchcrafts.” Almost half were convicted and subsequently executed. The belief in witches was at this time pervasive and held at all levels of society from the lowest peasantry to elite society; this included high-ranking magistrates who took the threat of witchcraft to the security of the state very seriously, producing a number of learned treatises on how it might be effectively countered. The course will examine a variety of readings from the period, including treatises on witchcraft, inquisitor’s manuals, literary sources, and actual transcripts of witchcraft trials. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 234-IH1 The Problem of Evil 3 credits
Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the problem of evil: If God is all good, all knowing, and all powerful, then why is there so much evil and suffering in the world? Readings will include some biblical literature, early Christian thinkers like Ireanaeus and St. Augustine, as well as selected poetry, fiction, and drama, including Voltaire’s Candide, Alexander Pope’s Essay on Man, Albert Camus’ The Plague, and others. Prerequisite: HSMT 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 235-IH1 Sacred Ritual Russia/East Euro 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Explores the relationship between three key themes: (1) the role of symbolism in the historical context of Russian traditional culture in the late 8th to early 16th centuries CE; (2) motifs of ethnographic imagination in literature, visual arts, music, and architecture; and (3) the synthesis of philosophy, artistic expression, and religion as a way of life in old Russia. The class further explores the vocabulary of the Eastern Slavic folk art and the syncretic themes embedded in the Slavic ritual traditions. By exploring the aesthetic and philosophical roots of these “primitive” sources, students come to understand how the assimilation and integration of these sources—the symbolism and artistic language of icon painting, the traditions of old Russian books and literary monuments, the image and the role of the cathedral (khram), and design of a traditional costume—brought about the spiritual and creative energy of the modern Russian intellectual life. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 238-IH1 Mythology 3 credits
3 credits. Offered occasionally. Greek and Roman myths are the foundations of Western civilization, the means by which classical civilizations made sense of incomprehensible and powerful forces in the world, the elements, the heavens, and human destiny. In these stories, passed through the ages from their origins as oral and communal stories, generations have witnessed the birth of gods and goddesses, immortals who reside apart from humans, procreating, waging war, and intervening in the affairs of mortals. Versions of these myths entered the literary and in philosophical work of Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes, Herodotus, Plato, Pindar, and the lyric poets Ovid and Virgil. This course examines Greek, Roman, and Norse mythology, and later the founding myths of Mayan, Native American, and Celtic cultures, along with their enduring influence on literature, art, music, dance, and film. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 241-IH1 The Conquest of the Americas 3 credits
3 credits. Mattison. Offered fall. This course to be taught in Spanish and English. Were the Americas 'discovered' in the 15th century, or were these lands invaded and their peoples destroyed? What did contact with Europeans mean for the Western Hemisphere? When did the conquest begin, and where does it end? This course will include readings from Bartolome de Las Casas, Prescott's The Conquest of Mexico and The Conquest of Peru, Galeano's The Open Veins of Latin America, Che Guevara's Diaries, as well as writings that address the most recent issues of international trade and the self-determination of indigenous peoples.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 245-IH1 Civic Humanism 3 credits
3 credits. Orr. Offered occasionally. Civic humanism refers to a cluster of themes in Western political thought emphasizing the active, engaged life of the citizen and the cultivation of civic “virtue.” This course examines the development of civic humanism in Western political thought from ancient through Early Modern times, the varieties of civic humanist thought (communitarian and juridical), and the evolving attitudes of civic humanist writers towards the emergence of commercial society. Authors studied may include Aristotle, Cicero, Niccolo Machiavelli, John Milton, James Harrington, Algernon Sidney, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 247-IH1 Europe in the Dark Ages 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. A survey of the hidden origins of Europe in the period between the fall of Rome and the Renaissance of the 12th century. This class begins with Roman explorations into barbarian Europe (Tacitus, Agricola, and Germania) and looks at the movements and settlement of various tribes (Goths, Franks, Huns) that became the nations of Europe. It covers the great epics such as Beowulf, Song of Roland, Niebelungenlied, or Scandinavian sagas of Grettir, the Volsungs, or Burnt Njal. Religious writings running from St. Augustine (The City of God) through the pious De Contemptu Mundi of many popes and finally to the Vatican Councils will be covered. Finally, this class looks at medieval science in writers such as Isidore of Seville. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 249-IH1 Utopia and Apocalypse 3 credits
Intellectuals and dreamers throughout history have imagined utopias—perfect worlds in which all of the moral and social problems that eternally plague human societies are absent. Often, this has been accompanied by a religious or prophetic conviction in the apocalypse. Imaginings of utopia and apocalypse have produced some of the most vivid and profound religious, political, and artistic literature in history. This course will investigate many of the expressions of utopia and apocalypse in human history, beginning with the ancient writings of the Bible and Plato and continuing to the present day. At the heart of our investigation will be the following questions: What is the purpose of utopian literature? What role has it played in the development of political thought? Who is included and who is left out of Utopia? What happens when people try to realize utopian societies? Are utopian ideas dangerous? Useful? Necessary?

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 251-IH2 American Intellectual History 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Examines American history and thought from the Puritan settlements in Massachusetts through the American Revolution and the establishment of the Federal system. Readings include the writings of John Winthrop, Cotton Mather, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, James Madison, and Tom Paine. The course covers issues such as the debate over slavery (Frederick Douglass’s autobiography and key Supreme Court cases), the rise of the Progressive and Utopian movements, Colonialism, and Imperialism during the Mexican and Spanish-American wars. European intellectual traditions that were so crucial to the formation of American ideas are also taken into account. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 252-IH2 The Enlightenment & Critics 3 credits
3 credits. Offered occasionally. Begins with some representative Enlightenment thinkers in various fields and genres (Bacon, Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Jefferson, de Sade). The second part of the course focuses upon some traditional critiques of the Enlightenment found in the writings of the Romantics and the German Idealist philosophers, as well as in the works of various nationalist, Marxist, and conservative writers. After considering the very different approaches to the Enlightenment of Nietzsche, William Morris, and Dostoevsky, the course examines contemporary American “culture wars” as a battle over the legacy of the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 254-IH2 American Intell Hist 1865-Pres 3 credits
Tracing key developments in American intellectual history since the end of the Civil War, the course examines important topics such as the rise of Naturalism in the late 19th century, the birth of Progressivism, the emergence of intellectual and aesthetic Modernism, challenges to democratic culture, the emergence of New Deal liberalism and post-war conservatism, and the recent postmodernist turn. Students read works by important figures in the intellectual history of the modern United States, including William Graham Sumner, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Jane Addams, Thorstein Veblen, Clement Greenberg, Martin Luther King, Betty Friedan, Allan Bloom, and Noam Chomsky. Lectures and class discussions examine the readings and place them and their authors in intellectual and historical context. There are no prerequisites for this class, although a working knowledge of the general trajectory of post-Civil War U.S. history is an advantage. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 255-IH2 "Peace" & Political Modernity 3 credits
Modern Western thinkers from Hobbes to Hegel, from Max Weber to Norbert Elias, associate "becoming civilized" with the overcoming of violence by reason. A polity is deemed civilized when the brute force of all against all is transformed into a monopoly of the legitimate use of force by the modern state (Weber)--with the modern state understood as an institution bound by, and binding its citizens with, the authority of reason expressed in the rule of law. By voluntarily surrendering violence to the state, the citizens become "internally pacified," "civilized" (Elias), and capable of self-discipline. Contrary to these thinkers' speculation that the civilizing process would bring peace, the history of modernity has been scarred by violence unprecedented in magnitude and in kind. This course will be devoted to examining the (misguided) logic underscoring modern political thinkers' association of the modern state with peace. Authors discussed will include Hobbes, Locke, Grotius, Kant, Hegel, Weber, and Elias.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 256-IH2 American IH Civil War - 1960's 3 credits
Covers American history and thought from the Civil War and the rise of Naturalism in the late 19th century to industrial America in the Gilded Age and the consequent rise of Progressivism. It then moves on to Modernism (1910–1930) and the challenges to democratic culture (1930–1970), culminating in the student anti-war movements of the 1960s. Prerequisite:HMST101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 257-IH2 What Men Live By: Russian IHST 3 credits
Examines the broad scope of Russian intellectual history from its beginnings through the early 20th century, with particular focus on the work of Petr Chaadaev, Leo Tolstoy, Vladimir Soloviev, Nicholas Berdyaev, and Mikhail Bakhtin. Students travel back and forth through the Russian philosophical and cultural traditions, including the visual arts and music. Of special interest are the Russian contributions to spirituality, creativity, and organicity. Prerequisite: HMST101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 258-IH2 Law and American Culture 3 credits
This course will examine US history over the past two centuries by way of the major legal decisions that have shaped and changed American society: Plessy v Ferguson, Brown v Board of Education; Roe v Wade; Casey v Planned Parenthood; Cruzan v Missouri; among others. We will examine the historical context of these landmark decisions, and the notable controversies they have stirred—some continuously. We will also consider the difficult social and moral issues behind these cases—abortion, euthanasia, affirmative action, desegregation-- and how they have evolved (or not) in American society. What impact has the law had on these moral issues? Has the law successfully changed US society? How were the major legal decisions in US history made? How has society in turn shaped the law? Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 259-IH2 History of Socialism 3 credits
Covers the Utopian socialists, origins and fundamentals of classical Marxist theory, the split between communism and social democracy, and the construction and eventual demise of socialism in the Soviet Union, China, and elsewhere. The course studies trenchant critics and defenders of various brands of socialism and explores the possibility of a 21st century socialism that, drawing the lessons of its own history, can address either the problems besetting a seemingly triumphant capitalism around the globe, or the possibility of socialism’s obsolescence. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 260-IH2 The Age of Darwin 3 credits
This course explores Charles Darwin's ideas of natural selection and evolution, their origins, and their influences. It considers not only the work of Darwin himself, particularly "The Origins of Species" (1859), but also the historical context of his thought. Particular issues covered include the question of precursors to Darwin, the social, political, and theological ramifications of Darwinian thought, and the subsequent reception and influence of Darwinian ideas in the 19th and 20th Centuries.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 263-IH2 Deviant Bodies 3 credits
This course in the history of science, medicine, and American culture will examine scientific ideas about race, sex, sexuality, and heredity form the early nineteenth century through the present. Scientific and medical ideas about differences in anatomy, physiology and psychology have shaped social norms, public policy, and the development of identity. To better understand these processes, we will examine the ways in which scientific ideas about difference have evolved and persisted in American culture (as well as in Western Europe, occasionally, whose intellectual cultures informed American scientific and medical discourse). Authoritative scientific arguments about what makes people different from one another and what these differences mean has taken many forms. In particular, we will investigate the historical intersections of scientific, medical, and popular ideas about differences in bodies and behavior, the relationship between ideas and heredity and the evolution of sexual mores, gender norms, definitions of deviance, and the ways the exotic, the beautiful, the monstrous, and the pathological have been constructed and culturally and politically embedded.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

IHST 264-IH2 Homosexuality& Civilization II 3 credits
3 credits. Morrison. Offered spring. Surveys the period in the West from the 19th century to the present and also includes a survey of Islamic homosexuality and readings on the Native American berdache, or “man-woman.” The class explores the birth of modernity in the West, the American Renaissance and Aestheticism, the Decadents, Realists, and Symbolists, the 19th century sexologists, the New Woman, Wilde, “gay culture” during both world wars and the McCarthy Era, Stonewall and gay lib, and the emerging “queer” culture. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 265-IH2 Political Violence & Modernity 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Surveys modern conceptions of political violence through direct engagement with primary texts. The class follows a broadly chronological order and considers a wide array of theoretical texts deriving from and dealing with a range of modern historical matters of political violence—from state-sponsored violence and popular uprisings to mass extermination and anti-colonial revolutions. Major themes for discussion and debate include the distinction between political violence and warfare; the relationship between violence, national identity, and the rise of modern states; the causes and consequences of violence as a form of political contestation; the rise of the police as a modern institution of violence; the dynamic interaction of terrorism and torture in modern warfare; the correlation of various ideologies (based on religious communities and texts, scientific discourses on health and hygiene, and rhetoric of progress and enlightenment, etc.) to political violence; and alternatives to violence within political discourse. Most readings come from leading modern theorists of violence. Authors whose authority stems from a personal relationship to political violence (purveyor, victim, witness) are considered. The goal of the course is to provide the student with both a general background in the modern intellectual history of political violence, and a deep understanding of the problems and challenges political violence poses for the contemporary world. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 266-IH2 Human Nature in Polit. Thought 3 credits
3 credits. Orr. Offered occasionally. Examines changing conceptions of selfhood and human nature and how they have informed political and moral theory since the 17th century. Is human nature constant in all times and places or is it historically contingent and the product of environment? What are the ramifications of modernity’s progressive erosion of the strong conceptions of selfhood that informed classical moral thought? Readings include Descartes, Locke, Bentham, Dostoevsky, Ortega y Gasset, Golding, Sartre, Heidegger, Taylor, Derrida, and MacIntyre. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 270-IH2 Reading Peace:Hist Nonviolence 3 credits
3 credits. Mattison. Offered occasionally. From Aristophanes’ Lysistrata in 410 BC to the early Quakers, from The Beatitudes of Jesus to the writings of Mahatma Ghandi and Martin Luther King, the vision of peace has been one of the great hopes of mankind. In times of war, who are the peacemakers? This course examines the seminal writings of the advocates of peace and nonviolent solutions to political conflict, from the ancient Greeks to the 21st century. The course questions the received wisdom, challenges conventional assumptions, and envisions our way toward a just and lasting realization of peaceful societies in the century to come. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 271-IH2 History of the American City 3 credits
3 credits. Garral. Offered occasionally. This course critically examines the history of American Cites – in particular, the historical forces that have shaped the American city from colonial times to the present day. Using readings in history, architecture, urban ethnography & literature, we will seek to uncover the largely invisible forces that have created the physical shape & social experience of the American city. Topics include: urban order & disorder, industrialization, the City Beautiful Movement, congestion, slums, suburbanization, and urban renewal. Highlighted cities are: New York, Chicago, L.A., and especially Baltimore, which we will use as our lab.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 272-IH2 History of Silence 3 credits
3 credits. Mattison. Offered occasionally. Traces the use of silence in human activity and thought, from the earliest written sacred texts and mystical practices of Western, Middle Eastern, African, and Asian cultures up through the use of silence in humor, silent film, and the music of John Cage. We explore silence as a contemplative space and a communicative medium in visual and literary art, philosophical inquiry, and spiritual practice, from the experience of Medieval monks to contemporary politics and astrophysics. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 273-IH2 Man, Animal, Machine 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. A critical introduction to the relationships between humans, animals, and machines, as these have colored philosophical, scientific, and social thought in the West since the 1870s. Students first study a series of definitive moments in the scientific and political understanding of animals (Darwin’s revisions to natural selection, controversies surrounding vitalism and mechanism, eugenics and racism, and the literary treatment of animals from Orwell to Coetzee). They then address the human dependence onand interaction with machines (e.g. the Marxist conception of technology, the Fordist effort toward a fusion of economic and social goals, and early AI). The remainder of the course examines contemporary problematics, such as animal rights and “animality” in ethics, the limits of artificial intelligence in philosophy and film, and the intermeshing of human desire and freedom with technology and cyberspace. Darwin, Marx, Ballard, Dreyfus, Oshii, Ford, Coetzee, Canguilhem, Rabinbach, and Oshii are among the figures studied in this course. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 274-IH2 Hist of Sensibility:East &West 3 credits
3 credits. Rhee. offered spring. This course traces the history of sensibility in the last two hundred years, from the idea of lyric sensibility in England in the late eighteenth century, to the romantic sensibility that thrived in Germany in the early nineteenth, to the notion of decadence in late nineteenth century France, and by way of the so-called modern sensibility in the U.S. in the early decades of twentieth century, finally to the Cold War sensibility through which we view the texts written in the divided nation contexts of Germany and Korea. Focusing on the works of representative writers from the opposite sides of the globe, we will discuss the literary texts against the historical backdrop of a nuclear world, and we will address a range of social and intellectual issues that inform their intelligibility. These issues include modernism, modernity, "belated modernity," enlightenment and the dialectics of enlightenment, collective guilt, trauma, "diasporic consciousness," and, importantly, the changing concept of the nation as "home."

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 275-IH2 Thinking Women 3 credits
3 credits. Ghaussy. Offered occasionally. Writing women and women’s difference into history is a contradictory project. Too often “women’s thought” is seen as separate or in opposition to men’s thought, rather than in congruence with it. Yet, when looking at the gross of intellectual history survey courses, it becomes all too obvious that women, and feminist thought, are still conspicuously absent from the canon. This course seeks to overcome the bias that there is only a marginal female intellectual tradition that remains outside of “proper” history before the advent of the contemporary women’s movement. This does not involve the exclusion of men from the ranks of liberatory thinkers concerning the woman’s question. When looking at feminist and women’s thought in Europe and the U.S. from the 18th century to the 1970s, it appears that gendered intellectual production is relational, i.e., tied to socio-political conditions that allow its expression. Hence the revolutionary period of the late 18th century attracted men such as Dafoe and women such as Olympe de Gouge, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Flora Tristan to write about education, citizenship, human rights, and poverty. Enlightenment ideals and the Industrial Revolution had staunch critics in figures like George Sand in France, Mary Shelley in England, and the Romantic salonières Varnhagen, Günderrode, Schlegel-Schelling, and Arnim in Germany. The 19th century has been characterized as solidifying the separation of gendered social spheres for men and women, and many women wrote about and undertook social and philanthropic work in this period. The course examines suffrage and abolitionism as feminist preoccupations in the U.S., nationalism and imperialism as forces that influenced women’s intellectual lives in Europe, and writing such as J. S. Mill, F. Engels, and A. Bebel on gender and the conditions of the working class. The Bolshevik Revolution also inspired figures such as Rosa Luxemburg and Clara Zetkin, two leading intellectuals and socialists in Germany. Finally, the focus shifts to Simone de Beauvoir in the mid-20th century in Europe and Betty Friedan in the U.S. as advocates of an active intellectual tradition of thinking about gender and women in the West. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 276-IH2 Urbanism: Modern American City 3 credits
3 credits. D’Oca. Offered occasionally. From the ruins and excesses of the 20th century American city, we are left with 21st century urbanism—the multiple, ever-shifting ways in which people now experience public space and activity. This course examines the trends and ideologies that gave rise to the industrial city and suburbs, urban renewal areas and ghettos, and finally the contemporary city, which simultaneously recycles, mixes, and mourns all of these to produce American urbanism. Readings, class discussions, local site visits, and guest presentations from architects and artists highlight design on an urban scale. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 278-IH2 Revolutions 3 credits
3 credits. Offered occasionally. The violent revolutions and uprisings of the 19th and 20th centuries base many of their revolutionary ideologies in the ideas of secularism that characterized the enlightenment and informed 19th and 20th century ideology. This course traces some of the dominant ideas and movements that defined and fed revolutionary fervor and culminated in revolutionary actions from the 18th century to the present, where revolution is characterized by fragmentation, competing schools of thought, and movements, and in some cases a return to a religious order. To understand what kinds of epistemologies (knowledge-forming ideas) dominated and influenced the worldview of the writers and thinkers, scientists, artists, and activists, students immerse themselves in the intellectual climate of the time. Students read primary texts that serve as a gateway into understanding ideas that shaped the knowledge of the writers of the time. This course is interdisciplinary and therefore looks beyond the ideas of revolutions, cultural revolutions, social movements, and the tenor of revolutionary ideas in de-colonizing nations in a variety of texts—ranging from literature, the arts, and philosophy to political and economic theory. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 281-IH2 Psychohistory & Autobiography 3 credits
3 credits. Merrill. Offered occasionally. The concept for this course grows out of Erik Erikson’s Life History and the Historical Moment, in which he writes that certain individuals raise their individual patienthood (i.e., neurosis) to a general cultural level, and through tremendous struggle resolve for the entire culture what they could not resolve for themselves as individuals. Modernism rises with the self-consciousness of individuals. Readings include Rousseau’s Confessions and Erikson’s own Young Man Luther, Freud’s work on da Vinci, and many others that attempt to understand history through the psychoanalysis of individual men and women who may have lost their own lives but in the process created enduring historical movements. The course covers the period of history from the Renaissance and Reformation to the 20th century. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 283-IH2 Modern Political Theory 3 credits
3 credits. DeBrabander. Offered spring. What is the best political state in which humans should live? What form of state delivers and protects individual freedom best? Is individual human freedom even a desirable political goal or concern in the first place? What can ensure peaceful cohabitation of diverse populations within a state? What can ensure peaceful cohabitation between nations? What political constitution is best equipped to achieve economic prosperity? Alternately, what form of state is most suited to fostering great cultural achievements? What makes for the most tolerant state? When, if ever, is political, cultural or religious tolerance excessive? These are some of the most significant and vexing questions that recur among political theorists over the past 2 centuries. In this course, we will examine the writings of modern and contemporary political theorists and consider their- and our- responses to these urgent questions, among others.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 287-IH2 From Humanism to Post-Humanism 3 credits
3 credits. Merrill. Offered occasionally. The conceptions of human nature that we hold today were the creation of the Renaissance. We will trace the creation and evolution of the ideas of humanism from the Renaissance through Modernism. Post-modernism is better thought of as Post-humanism, a rejection of the Renaissance conception of human nature. This class will follow the rise and fall of the idea of humanism.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 288-IH2 History of Psychoanalysis 3 credits
3 credits. DeBrabander. Offered occasionally. In this course, we will study the history, origins, development and transformations of psychoanalytic theory, as handed down from Freud. We will start by examining some precursors to Freudian psychoanalysis, in Greek and Early Modern European philosophy and psychotherapy. Then we will focus on Freud’s work, the basic doctrines of his theory, and its changes over his lifetime. Finally, we will follow the developments and transformations of Freudian theory in his followers and successors: Jung, Adler, Rank, Lacan, Kristeva, Klein, among others.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 290-IH2 The Open Source Revolution 3 credits
Most people have heard of Linux, a free "open source" operating system which was developed collaboratively. Prior to the advent of the internet, some ideas and designs were shared, not sold, in academia or in non-profits but lacked access to the streamlined distribution system present in the market that would allow them to be developed and tested by users in many different contexts. Now that the digital divide is closing, open source concept testing is faster and has the opportunity to circumvent the marketplace. Now used in art and manufacturing as well, this work model impacts culture, social stratification, morality, politics, and conceptions of property. In this course, we will use sociology of work literature to trace the origins of open source, identify its core elements, and begin to understand its consequences.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 291-IH2 History of the Idea of Race 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Recent genetic research has revealed that humans are more than 99.9 percent identical and racial categories have no meaningful basis in biology. However, race remains a powerful idea in contemporary society, contributing to our personal identities and persistent inequalities. This course examines the history of the idea of race, beginning in the late Middle Ages when Europeans first encountered the diversity of Africa, Asia, and the Americas. These initial encounters formed the basis for a “science” of race that emerged during the Enlightenment and reached its peak during the Victorian period, when the presumed superiority of white Europeans was used to justify the exploitation of non-white peoples. The course ends with a consideration of the experiences of those who were oppressed during the 19th century, as revealed in their memoirs.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

IHST 295-IH2 Intell. Hst of American South 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. The American South produced five of the first seven American presidents and the first great chief justice, and also generated the bloodiest war this nation ever fought. It gave the world blues, jazz, country music, William Faulkner, Elvis, and Martin Luther King. A slave society in the land of freedom, a bastion of agrarianism in an urbanizing nation, the South stood both inside and outside the American mainstream. Students study the Southern founding fathers, including the conflicted Jefferson; America’s strongest conservative tradition ever as represented by John C. Calhoun and George Fitzhugh; and read Wilbur J. Cash’s iconic study, The Mind of the South. They examine Southern literature, social thought, and the cultural matrix that produced both Robert E. Lee and the Klan, both Birth of a Nation and To Kill a Mockingbird, and explore the mythical South, and endeavor to replace it with the authentic one. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 207 Intro to Literary Studies 3 credits
This course invites the student to practice reading and analyzing text as a way of developing cognition speed and creative flexibility. It utilizes a strategy of developing cultural literacy in tandem with reviewing literary structural devices and theoretical approaches to doing text analysis on a broad range of work. The readings will be selected from a range of classical work such as MONKEY, Sundiata, The Book of the Dead, Klytemestra Stayed Home, The Gospel of Mary, and Gilgamesh to contemporary works by Dan Moore, Leslie Marmon Silko, Madison Smartt Bell, Terry McMillan, Rita Mae Brown and Ishmael Reed. Requirements include an oral panel presentation, one analytical research essay, one take-home review of the reading and other minor assignments related to class participation.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 214 The Literature of Empire 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Serves as an introduction to Colonial literature in the canonized male and the lesser-mapped female traditions. While works such as Robinson Crusoe, Treasure Island, and A Passage to India have been linked with the Imperialist project of empire, works like Jane Eyre and Orlando have only recently come under similar critical scrutiny. The female Colonial legacy —in which women have traditionally held a more precarious position with respect to nationbuilding— has perhaps been less charted because women were located on a continuum of simultaneous oppression and domination within empire-building. This course serves as an overview and introduction to Colonial texts by juxtaposing men’s and women’s Colonial writing to study how the writers represented (or omitted) Colonialism, and how the ideologies of Empire surface or are critiqued in their works. Students read and analyze the literature in its socio-political context and focus particularly on the contradictions and paradoxes of nation-building and gendered and racialized involvement in the projects of Colonialism. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 216 Caribbean Lit. in 20th Century 3 credits
This introductory course surveys Caribbean writers in English across genre as a study of New World civilization and language. The original and translated works represent the various island cultures including Haiti, Trinidad & Tobago, Jamaica, Guyana, Cuba, and Barbados. The required readings will be selected from a range of writers including Derek Walcott, Miss Louise, Earl Lovelace, Jean Rhys, Jacques Romaine, Cecily Waite-Smith, Anson Gonzales, Wilson Harris, Kamau Edward Braithwaite, Mervyn Morris, Aime Cesaire, Pearl Entou Springer, Renee Depestre and others. Requirements include an oral panel presentation, one analytical research essay, one take-home review of the reading and other minor assignments related to class participation.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 218-IH1 The Age of Shakespeare 3 credits
Shakespearean drama – including history, comedy, and tragedy – serves as the anchoring focus of this course. We will read and discuss Shakespeare’s playwriting alongside contemporaries such as Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson, with particular attention to the historical and cultural conditions informing their work. We will explore topics like social class, familial relations, human sexuality and selfhood, as depicted in early modern literature. In turn, we will consider how those representations might inform our understanding of society today. Course readings will be supplemented by philosophical/theoretical texts including Marx, Freud, and others to be determined.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 232 The Beat Generation 3 credits
The writers and artists of the Beat movement might be regarded as descendants of the American Transcendentalists. They resemble Thoreau in their distrust of technology and Whitman in their faith in America and individualism. Nonconformists, the Beats espoused pacifism and environmentalism, and were drawn to Buddhism and the expansion of consciousness. This course will examine the writing and music of their period and its influence on subsequent American writers. The work of Kerouac, Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, Burroughs, di Prima, Corso, Rexroth and others will be studied.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 233-IH1 Chaucer and His World 3 credits
Intellectual history involves the study of philosophers, intellectuals, artists, and traditions of thought in their cultural and social settings, with special attention to understanding the causes of intellectual change, the statics of intellectual traditions, and the dynamics of intellectual movements. Chaucer is often regarded as a pivotal figure in the transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. He was associated with all of the major writers of his age—Machaut in France to Boccaccio in Italy. His age includes revolts among peasants against monarchy, the early Protestant reformers, the Crusades and the culture of Islam brought back into Europe, and the beginnings of modern science. The course looks back to the Medieval roots of the so-called High Middle Ages as well as forward to the Renaissance. Using the work of a single writer like Chaucer as a pivot point for investigating the whole world offers a unique and worthwhile experience. Prerequisite: HMST101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 234 Contemporary Fiction 3 credits
In this course we will enter the ongoing conversation among professional and casual literary critics about the virtues and vices of contemporary fiction (with an emphasis on American, Canadian and British writers). Because many of the works we read will comment upon events and cultural phenomena we are living with today, this seminar will examaine the varying ways artists interact with and are influenced by history. We'll read some of the latest works to seize the critical spotlight, as well as books from the distant past -- the 1980s and 1990s.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 246-IH1 Cunning, Guile & Anc Greek Cul 3 credits
3 credits. Myers. Offered occasionally. Why do cunning and guileful characters figure so prominently in Greek myth and epic? Does Greek philosophy begin with ruse? The purpose of this course is to explore the ancient Greek fascination with cunning and to discover its place in Greek literary and intellectual culture. Readings include myth, Homer's works, Pre-Socratic philosophy, PLato, Greek tragedy, as well as Aesop's fables.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 262-IH2 Phil Construct of Africana Lit 3 credits
3 credits. Thompson. Offered occasionally. Initiation and assimilation (as cultural devices to both maintain and change society), offer a reader a window into understanding precepts that control 21st century life in African, African American, African Caribbean, and African Latino societies. The African American is a historic amalgam of these precepts and the politics around them for more than 500 years. This course uses writings based on the Seven Hermetic Laws of Ancient Egypt, traditional African society, the Harlem Renaissance, contemporary rap music, the Seven Principles of Kwanzaa, and a comprehensive time-line anthology of writing on the 500 year sojourn of African Americans specifically. This course also asks the student to exercise primary critical thinking concepts and tools in consideration of the meaning (of both the readings and the historic experiences), to the self that the student is building to function in the 21st century. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 266-IH2 19th C. Literature & Culture 3 credits
Intellectual history involves the study of philosophers, intellectuals, artists and traditions of thought in their cultural and societal settings, with special attention to understanding the causes of intellectual change, the statics of intellectual traditions, and the dynamics of intellectual movements. This course focuses on the literature and history of the Victorian period and its importance in the modern Western intellectual tradition. In addition to poetry and literature, the class studies social and historical texts from the period, both "official" and demotic, including crime statistics, and looks at the origins of photography, the flourishing Victorian underworld, political and religious influences, and the vicissitudes of Colonialism and the power of the British Empire. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 268 Africana Storytellers Workshop 3 credits
This fun course focuses on reading and telling stories of all kinds by Africana writers. It begins with the first fairytale in human existence, the Egyptian Tale of the Two Brothers from the Papyrus D’Orbiney and the Persian Conference of the Birds by Attar and continues with Africana connections to American Indian Myths & Legends, Pow Wow: Charting the Lines in the American Experience and a anthology of African Tales. Grade requirements include exercises and “telling” assignments using your body and voice and doing writing that develops the student’s ability to compose and tell both stories adapted from the assigned reading and original stories from the storyteller’s life. It is be noted that the course is primarily centered on understanding the worldview of Africana people globally. Two public readings and two analytical peer reviews are also required.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 276-IH2 Harlem Renaissance 3 credits
Surveys African American literature written during the Harlem Renaissance as a way of examining confluence of forces that created the New Negro at the beginning of the 20th century. The literature of the Harlem Renaissance represents several major artistic movements that created the contemporary African American persona and fueled subsequent artistic movements worldwide. Discussion of work by Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, Countee Cullen, W. E. B. Dubois, and Langston Hughes will be central to the course. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

LIT 279-IH2 Love in the Non-Western World 3 credits
From the complexity of re-created Egyptian Love Spells and Rituals and the search for the Buddha in Monkey-Folk Novel of China, to the complexity of modern mating, marriage, divorce and love forever after in Memoirs of a Geisha, Jagua Nana’s Daughter, Love in the Time of Cholera, Reservation Blues, and The Dragon Can’t Dance this course uses the Miniature Guide to Critical Thinking: Concepts & Tools to examine what we think about the culturally bound relationships and the implications that they have for 21st century global ethics. Grade Requirements include One Analytical Research Paper, One 10-Question Take Home Review of assigned reading and a number of Minor in-class assignments.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 283 To the Underworld and Back 3 credits
3 credits. Myers. Offered occasionally. Provides a survey of literature about the hero’s trip to the underworld, and what the hero learns from the dead that he needs to take back with him to the realm of the living. The course begins with the myths of Orpheus, Herakles, Odysseus, and other heroes who make it, alive, to the underworld and back, and follows with Book VI of Virgil’s Aeneid, and then Dante’s Inferno. The second half of the course examines variations of this theme in poetry, novels, drama, and film, including the work of Rimbaud, G.B. Shaw, Sartre, Pound, Broch, Monteverdi, Henze, and Birtwistle. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 284-IH2 Judaic Literature 3 credits
This course surveys narratives in the modern Judaic tradition. We will begin the course with the classic nineteenth-century Yiddish writers. We will discuss topics such as exile, hasidism, humor, rhetoric, satire, existentialism, self-referential and women's writing. We will read Hebrew fiction by the Nobel-Prize winner S. Y. Agnon and by other important Israeli, European, and American Jewish writers.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 285-IH2 Modern Folklore 3 credits
Today’s folklore is not restricted to rural communities but may commonly be found in cities, and, rather than dying out, it is still part of the learning of all groups from family units to nations, albeit changing in form and function. Folklore as a creative activity and as a body of unscrutinized or unverifiable assertions and beliefs has not vanished. Folklore has come to be regarded as part of the human learning process and an important source of information about the history of human life. It is a complex and subtle social phenomenon having to do with the production and transmission of narratives. In this course, we will study contemporary ideas and beliefs, traditions, narratives, legends and anecdotes from the perspectives of anthropology, sociology, psychology, linguistics, and literature.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

LIT 292-IH2 The Uncanny 3 credits
In this course, using Sigmund Freud's famous essay as a springboard, we will explore various manifestations of the Uncanny as it appears in fiction, aesthetics, architecture, poetry and film, with particular attention to the inflection of the Uncanny in the literary arts. In an attempt to get to the root of the question posed by the Uncanny - how can something be both familiar and unfamiliar at the same time? --we will consider phenomena that are marginal, liminal, obscure, threatening and subversive - all characteristics can be also found in familiar and apparently harmless everyday phenomena.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

LIT 302 Contemporary Drama 3 credits
Students will study the drama of the immediate contemporary theater through close reading and the staging of scenes of plays drawn from the Broadway, off-Broadway, Regional and International stages. Students will be asked to act, direct, and set scenes from the plays we read and discuss and to write about their experiences working with the plays.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 307-TH The Nature of the Book 3 credits
Examines how artists, critics, and theorists have understood the book—in both print and electronic formats—in the second half of the 20th century. Whether it is viewed as aesthetic object, disposable commodity, intellectual machine, or instrument for socio-political change, the book has been a focal point for many of today’s most prominent thinkers. Study and discussion lead to questions about the natures of language and reading, literary property, authorship, aesthetics, literacy, orality, interactivity, and textual materiality. Readings include the work of Jacques Derrida, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, Elizabeth Eisenstein, Keith A. Smith, Georges Poulet, and Stuart Moulthrop. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature or one IH1 or IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 311 Reading Nabokov 3 credits
This course will use psychoanalytic and reader-reception theory to navigate through the complex work of the twentieth century Russian/American author, Vladimir Nabokov. Each novel will be read in the context of contemporary critical theory, with particular emphasis on Nabokov's vexed and ambivalent relationship with Freud. Texts will include Nabokov's own critical and cultural essays, early and later short stories (in translation), and at least four of the following full-length works: "Lolita," "Despair", "Pnin", "Speak, Memory" "Pale Fire," "Ada," "Laughter in the Dark" and "Invitation to a Beheading".

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 313-TH Literature and Remembering 3 credits
Uses literary texts to explore the process of memory and the ways in which humans make sense of the past in personal, collective, and family histories. Authors will include Chekov, Ibsen, Faulkner, Proust, Woolf, Morrison, Kundera, Nietzsche, Baudelaire, and Benjamin. Students are encouraged not only to think critically about the readings but also to explore their own habitual modes of remembering and connecting to the past. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature or one IH1 or IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 314-TH Body Discourses 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Whether we experience our bodies as the site and center of our being, or we feel we are the proprietors of a shell called “the body,” whether we are at one with it or feel alienated from it, our body is always with us, we are in our body, and we desire to know it. To understand and define it, fix it, liberate it, expose it, invent and imagine “truths” that are inscribed in the flesh, however, we turn, necessarily, to symbolization and language. When studying the body, we therefore recognizes the somatic players in the drama such as skin and bones, hair, organs, ova, semen, blood—but one can be amazed at the stories woven into intricate plots by theorists from a variety of disciplines that offer often strange, often profound, and often literal insights into the body. This course serves as an introduction to the complex and extensive field of body theory, exploring texts that narrate the sexed body, the gendered body, the orgasmic body, the ascetic body, the tortured body, the uncanny body, the raced body, the foreign body, the body in images and film, and the body and technology through a variety of discourses, ranging from religious to scientific discourses, discourses on aesthetics, political activism, cultural theory, and psychoanalysis. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 319-TH Reading Signs: Semiotics 3 credits
Semiotics is the study of signs and sign systems. Language is the most elaborate and pervasive of sign systems, but it is far from the only one—images, clothes, advertising, sports, social behavior, in fact almost all cultural expression may be considered to be governed by an intricate network of signs out of which “meaning” and “significance” arise. This course explores a range of signs and sign systems in an attempt to understand the codes they embody and the principles that govern their creation and operation. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 324 Contemporary American Poetry 3 credits
Beginning with the anti-academic reactions of Beat poetry, contemporary American poetry has often been concerned with subverting the theories and criticisms of poetry in favor of philosophically and politically charged poetry that breaks down literary canons. Such subversion has created a schism between elitist and populist poets. In this course, students read, discuss, and write about contemporary American poetry after the Second World War, focusing largely on poets, formal and avant-garde, who are living and writing today. Course work consists of readings, criticism, discussions, short written analytical responses, imitative poems, formal essays, and group presentations. Poets covered may include Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, Charles Bukowski, Yusef Komunyakaa, Frank O’Hara, Adrienne Rich, Amiri Baraka, Carolyn Forché, Gary Soto, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Cathy Song, Sherman Alexie, and Lyn Hejinian, among others. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 327 Modern Masters: 3 credits
Topic-driven course. This course will be an opportunity for students to immerse themselves in the work of a seminal 20th century master. Prerequisite: One 200-level academic course.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 340-TH Post Colonial Legacies 3 credits
To get a sense of how our understanding of the world has been shaped by the histories and ideas of imperialist and colonial culture and knowledge production, and the kind of resistance that questioned, eroded and sometimes forcefully dislodged it, we will study some of the myriad voices that constitute the vibrant and evolving field of postcolonial and border literature, contact zone writing and subaltern studies. We will explore the tropes of hybridization, métissage and postcolonial and subaltern identities, pay close attention to the structures of border language and narration, look at the production of myths by nations vis-a-vis local and global experiences, expose ourselves to the ideas and critiques of various diasporas in critical writing, literature and films and discuss how these narratives imagine and re-imagine the legacies of the colonial impact and globalization.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 341 The Art of the Lyric 3 credits
From the Troubadors to Tupac, words in song have mattered. Do songs differ from poetry in that they must be intelligible at first hearing? Students examine traditional lyrics from medieval ballads and songs in Shakespeare to the lyrics of Bob Dylan, Joan Armatrading, Richard Thompson, and Lucinda Williams. Students read Joyce, Yeats, Frost, and Michelle Shocked. Particular attention is devoted to lyric and poetic devices: alliteration, rhyme, wordplay, and “the hook.” Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 350-TH Russian Existential Imaginatio 3 credits
This course will focus on two definitive figures of Russian literature: Dostoevsky, the great explorer of resentment as a powerful and sometimes unaccountable motive in man, and Tolstoy, the supreme portrayer of the organicity of life, who engages his reader in “standing face to face with life.” The fundamental question--“What is the meaning of life?”--put by Tolstoy and intensely propounded in Dostoevsky’s novels, differs from the attitudes of the thinkers of the ancient times, while it remains modern today. This question will be examined in the context of the melancholic virulence of Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamotzov, and the organic expansiveness of Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, which form the intellectual core of this course. Despite the tremendous difference in the literary and human atmosphere they create, the works by these writers point to a method of inquiry into being in the world--an intellectual overture to the Existentialism of the 20th century.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 354-TH Critical Studies Seminar 3 credits
Through readings, discussion, and student presentations, this seminar examines the history, theory, and practice of the following 20th century critical discourses: psychoanalysis, semiotics, structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, feminism, postmodernism, and cultural studies. The goal of the course is to put critical theory in context so students can read, understand, and discuss how it affects and has been affected by artists. Class is run as a seminar with no more than fifteen students, who lead the discussions. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 358 War and Literature 3 credits
3 credits. Mattison. Offered occasionally. In the 20th century, humanity crossed a “certain threshold” according to Nobel laureate Czeslaw Milosz. “Things too atrocious to think of did not seem possible, but, beginning in 1914, they proved to be more and more possible. A discovery has been made, that civilizations are mortal.” Twentieth-century warfare claimed the lives of more than one hundred million people. In this course, students read the works of writers who suffered and survived the World Wars, the American War in Vietnam, and the wars of uprising and revolution in Latin America and Africa, including the “soldier poets” of the trenches, Ernest Hemingway, Mary Lee Settle, Marguerite Duras, Kurt Vonnegut, W. B. Sebald, Tim O’Brien, and others. The course concludes with works that address the implications of war in the 21st century. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 359 Palestinian-Israeli Conflict 3 credits
3 credits. myers. Offered occasionally. The course is, first, a history of this 100-year war, giving due attention to the formation and internal complexity of the two nationalisms, Jewish and Palestinian. We will attempt to understand the conflict within the wider contexts of Middle Eastern and international politics, and to highlight the role of the United States. The second half of the course focuses on diplomatic attempts to reach a settlement after the failure of Oslo and on problems that stand in the way of such a settlement. Taking account of the most recent developments, students consider competing proposals for a solution and devise their own plan for Middle East peace.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 361-TH Masculinity 3 credits
Examines the social history of masculinity, beginning with a survey of the goals, methods, and controversies in the growing field of gender studies and men’s studies. Students use theoretical and literary texts to analyze the construction of masculinity as a concept in relation to race, class, and sexual orientation. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 362 Doing Documentary Work 3 credits
3 credits. Wallace. Offered minimester. This course uses litterary documentary to explore how one’s point of view is influenced by individual frames of reference, social, and educational backgrounds, personal morals and political beliefs. Through documentary research (oral histories, archival sources, etc.) and writing, students explore the relationship between “reality” and the narratives we construct to represent and interpret it. Texts will include literary documentary works such as George Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier, James Agee’s Let Us Now Praise Famous Men, Muriel Rukeyser's book-length poem about West Virginia coal miners, The Book of the Dead, and Gary Nabhan’s Gathering the Desert. Robert Cole’s Doing Documentary Work is a primary source for methodology.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 363-TH Theory of the Everyday 3 credits
The great hero of the 20th and 21st centuries has been the Everyman, the Average Joe or Plain Jane whose boring, normal life gets somehow instilled with profound significance. This is not an accident, as modern life has been structured and homogenized while it has also cultivated individualism and self-consciousness. Historians and theorists such as Michel de Certeau and Henri Lefebvre have articulated the concept of the 'Everyday' to describe a fundamental category of human (especially modern) existence: the repeating, patterned, highly structured and anomic modern life. This course will study theories of the Everyday, important historical concepts of the analysis of Daily Life, and literature, art and media that revolve around the Everyday and employ it as a basis for normative existence. Readings will include de Certeau, Lefebvre, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, Ionesco, Freud, Elias, studies of consumer politics and products, the feminist concept of the Personal is Political, still life paintings, the soap opera, and other materials. The final project will be an applied analysis of some aspect of Everyday life, read through the course materials. This course will provide students with a new way of looking at their everyday existence.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 364-TH Reading Freud 3 credits
Offers a chance for in-depth study of a seminal 20th-century thinker. Texts (sometimes excerpts and sometimes entire works) include: The Interpretation of Dreams, The Psychopathology of Everyday Life, Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious, Moses and Monotheism, Totem and Taboo, and Beyond the Pleasure Principle. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 368-TH Queer Literature and Theory 3 credits
Examines the theoretical controversies surrounding terms like “invert,” “heterosexual”/“homosexual” (invented in the 19th century), “gay,” “straight,” “bisexual,” “lesbian,” “queer,” “transgendered,” and “transsexual” and read so-called “non-normative” literatures and other “texts” across these theories. The readings vary each year but may include the works of such writers, theorists, artists, and philosophers as Oscar Wilde, Michel Foucault, Andre Gide, Freud, Jeannette Winterson, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, James Baldwin, Thomas Mann, Virginia Woolf, Kathy Acker, Jean Genet, Eve Sedgwick, Leslie Feinberg, Paul Monette, Dorothy Allison, Robert Glück, Audre Lorde, Plato, Kate Bornstein, David Sedaris, Judith Butler, and Andrew Holleran; poets including Whitman, Ginsberg, Hemphill, Hughes, and Rich, filmmakers including Marlon Riggs, and Michelle Parkerson; and artists including Deborah Bright and David Wojnarowicz. Assignments may include class presentations, reading papers, and quizzes. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 371 Russian Literature 3 credits
This course is a study of the intense period of literary production and social upheaval from about the time of Catherine the Great (d. 1796) to the Bolshevik revolution in 1917. Connections are made between literary works (novels, stories, plays, poems, journalism, philosophy) and the social history, especially with reference to the influence ideas from the west on Russian culture. Some authors covered are Pushkin, Herzen, Chernyshevsky, Dostoyevsky, Gogol, Tolsoty, Gorky, Chekov, Belinsky, Lenin, Trotsky, Bakunin, Goncharov, and others.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 372-TH Feminist Theories 3 credits
Examines the contributions of feminist theories to the cultural understanding of power and oppression and to the struggle for social justice. Emphasis is on race, class, and gender as intersecting variables in a matrix of domination. Special attention is made to practical applications of theories for creative artists. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 383 Postwar American Fiction 3 credits
In this course we will study salient works of American fiction published in the second half of the twentieth century (primarily in the fifties, sixties and seventies). Our discussion will consider the literature's relationship to cultural and historical currents of the era, such as the Cold War, America's imperialist projects abroad, the struggle for Civil Rights, "the sexual revolution", feminist thought, and the nation's growing affluence). The writers we read may include Saul Bellow, James Baldwin, John Cheever, Joan Didion, Ken Kesey, Toni Morrison, Vladimir Nabokov, Joyce Carol Oates, Thomas Pynchon, Philip Roth, John Updike, and Alice Walker. Students will prepare a twenty minute presenation and write weekly prep papers, a midterm take-home exam, and a final essay.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

LIT 388-TH Perform. Studies& Cyber Theory 3 credits
This cass focuses on theories of what constitutes 'performance' in everyday life, ritual, art, and cyberspace interaction. As a new and interdisciplinary field, performance studies merges anthropology, sociology, theatre, art, and new media as a way to both blur and redefine the boundaries of what is considered performative. The theoretical framework of performativity, whether it is looking at the everyday presentation of the self or the performance of nations and states, is a tool that enables us to critically examine the canons which produce these constructed identities. The course will look at key writers of performance studies and cyber theory in order to understand the effects of performative actions, especially in the context of the global expansion of media culture.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

LIT 398 Literature Independent Study 3 credits
For students wishing to work with a particular instructor on subject matter not covered by regularly scheduled classes, a special independent study class may be taken. A contract is required, including signatures of the instructor and the student's department chair. A 398 class may not be used to substitute for a department's core requirement or senior thesis / senior independent. Learning contract required before registration. Minimum of junior class standing and 3.0 GPA required.

Prerequisite: students at the Junior/Senior level with a Cumulative Grade Point Average of at least 3.000

LIT 411 Yeats,Joyce, Woolf 3 credits
High modernism is often invoked but seldom read with comprehension. Virginia Woolf wryly declared, “In 1910, human character changed,” and if this was not to be, the ways of conveying character certainly had changed: the interior monologue, fragmentation, and a mythic method allowed these three writers to convey deeper and more ambiguous messages about a world that still exists—altered by WWI and II and technological change. The class reads the major poetry of Yeats, concentrating on his later work, along with Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses, Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse, and finally Between the Acts. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 415 Lit. of the American South 3 credits
Writings by William Faulkner, Zora Neal Hurston, James Agee, Flannery O’Connor, James Dickey, Richard Wright and others. Are these writers regional or universal, radical or reactionary, experimental or traditional? Do they celebrate or criticize the South? What is the American South: geographic place, fictional setting, or state of mind? Seminar discussion, no lectures. Electronic submissions midterm and final exams, final paper required.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 418 Ecopoetics: Lang/Mind/Ecology 3 credits
In this course we will examine the ecological paradigm and its cognitive and aesthetic implications. The course seeks an interdisciplinary mixture of reading and writing. Topics will include: the many swings in scientific thinking (Western, Eastern and indigenous) about how the universe ?works.? We?ll take a historical and cross-cultural look at poetic and mythic structures as literary forms (oral and written) through which human beings have expressed their relationships with the natural world, with a specific focus on theoretical perspectives informing the critical discussions about ecopoetry. Each student will write and present original poems/stories expressing their own relationships with the natural world as well as analytical essays on topics covered in the course.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 420 High Moderism in Lit. & Philos 3 credits
“High Modernism” denotes a moment in Euro/American history between about 1900 and 1930 when the grounds of philosophical and artistic reality began to shift. These writers, committed to the notion of a high culture and generally opposed to the emerging avant gardes (Futurism, Surrealism, Dada, Cubism), reworked such fundamental questions as human existence, consciousness, time, language, history, and identity. They tended to produce “monumental” works encompassing a totality of human experience. The class covers both literature and philosophy but may include some readings in science and math, especially Einstein or Poincaré. Readings include some of the following authors: French writers Marcel Proust, Henri Bergson, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty; German authors Martin Heidegger, Edmund Husserl, Thomas Mann, and Ludwig Wittgenstein; American writers T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, Henry Adams, Henry James, William Faulkner, Gertrude Stein, and Ezra Pound; and British writers Virginia Woolf, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, E. M. Forster, and Joseph Conrad. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 421 Third World Women Writers 3 credits
The question of women writing in the Third World is linked to issues of difference, othering, colonization, subjugation, and religious fundamentalism, among others. This course introduces works that directly address the conditions of women under Islamic, patriarchal, and postcolonial rule. To gain better insight into the ntertwined nature of the "Orient" and "Occident" and to assess critically our own involvement in Third World issues, we will also explore notions such as "Orientalism" and the conditions of postcoloniality and religious fundamentalism in theoretical texts. Here we will concentrate on analyzing the intersections of nation, gender/sex/sexuality, class/caste, and race/ethnicity/religion and see how these are represented in our readings.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 433 Freak Lit: Difference in Lit. 3 credits
Freak Literature will analyze poems, stories, novels, plays, memoirs, and films that in one way or another represent 'freaks'---persons whose bodies, historically, have reinforced normality by defying it. With aid of critics and theorists, students will learn about the social categories that such bodies transgressed, the various discourses and cultural rituals that made them human spectacles, the fallout stereotypes that continue to persist today, as well as the redefinition of the 'freak' as counter-cultural icon. Close examination of how literature's re-staging of 'freaks' serves often politically-loaded narratives will certainly complicate our understanding of exploitation while providing radical new ways of thinking about body and identity.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 437 Africans in the New World 3 credits
3 credits. Cager. Offered fall. As an introductory course in Africana studies, the readings focus on developing a broadbased knowledge of the history and culture of African Americans from both an insider and an outsider perspective. While the course links literature and culture in Africa to literature and culture in the New World, it especially focuses on contemporary Africana writers and includes works by a range of classical and avant-garde writers. Some works covered include Catch A Fire: An Intergenerational Anthology, Van Sertima’s They Came before Columbus, Sundiata Lester’s To Be a Slave, Toomer’s Cane, King’s Why We Can’t Wait, and Shange’s For Colored Girls. At least one living writer studied by the class will visit to read and discuss his or her work. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 442 Environmental Literature 3 credits
Where does nature begin or end? What is the natural? What do eco-terrorism, global warming, and the poisoning of the oceans and the Earth have to do with art? Are they art? Engage with naturalists and other writers and thinkers from Aldo Leopold’s seminal work to contemporary authors like Annie Dillard, Tom Horton, Dianne Ackerman, and David Foster Wallace. Prerequisite: HMST 101.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 445 Romanticism II 3 credits
In the preface to Justine, the Marquis de Sade poses a question that seems to have preoccupied the culture of the late 19th century: Is it “possible to find in oneself physical sensations of a sufficiently voluptuous piquancy to extinguish all moral affections?” This class examines the second generation of Romantics, or negative Romanticism, in order to understand the retreat of the arts from the long-held commitment to political and moral ideals. Students examine the rise of aestheticism, symbolism, and art for art’s sake. The class reads literary works and also philosophy and history, including authors such as Byron, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Nietzsche, Huysmans, Wilde, Keats, and Dostoyevsky. In them, students see the collapse of European culture begun in the Renaissance and the beginnings of the dystopia of the 20th century. Prerequisite: One 200-level course in literature

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 446 Shakespeare in Performance 3 credits
An intensive examination of several of Shakespeare plays, such as Hamlet, Othello, Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, and As You Like It—all of which have enjoyed recent critically acclaimed cinematic treatments. Students explore Shakespeare’s work on the page, on the stage, and in the movies, studying the play texts, the classically presented BBC productions, and the recent film versions of the plays. Acting, directing, discussion, and writing are all part of the coursework. Prerequisite: One 300-level course in literature.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 451 Modernity in American Lit. 3 credits
3 credits. Jaskunas. Offered occasionally. This seminar will survey the literary and intellectual history of America’s late nineteenth century. During this time, the abolitionist movement reached its apex, Lincoln emancipated the slaves, the North defeated the Confederacy, and Reconstruction came to the South. The country witnessed the rise of the women’s suffragist movement, the advent of Darwinian thought and great leaps in technology and industry. In short, the United States became modern in the late nineteenth century, and the nation’s writers played a vital role in advancing narratives, aesthetics and ideas that would change how Americans think. The reading list will likely include fiction by Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, and Henry James. We will also sample recent works of intellectual history and writings by thinkers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, William James, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and W.E.B. Dubois.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 474 Byron and Shelley in Geneva 3 credits
In April 1816 both Lord Byron and Percy Shelley were expelled from England and made their way to Geneva, Switzerland. Although they were the best known and most notorious poets and activists in the world at the time, they had never met until their summer together in Geneva. This summer of 1816 was perhaps the most important turning point in the intellectual history of the west. Western humanism that had been born in the Renaissance reached its end this summer. Byron and Shelley re-read Rousseau’s work “in situ” and argued over the implications of the final failure of the French Revolution. This class will study the unique history of Geneva, Rousseau and the intellectual climate of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and the work Byron and Shelley wrote in Geneva and the few years immediately following their summer there.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

LIT 488 The Wire & American Naturalism 3 credits
Students in this seminar will consider The Wire, a "television novel" about crime in Baltimore, alongside the literary tradition of naturalism. Like the American naturalist writers of the early 20th century, The Wire suggests that individuals are captive to powerful social forces and political structures beyond their control. The program also shares with the naturalists an interest in the urban poor, abuses of power and social hierarchies. As we read from naturalists texts and view HBO's groundbreaking series, we will investigate the relationship between naturalism and political advocacy, representations of the poor by the privileged, and the intellectual underpinnings and consequences of naturalism. Possible readings include novels and stories by John Dos Passos, Richard Wright and Richard Price. (For a list of required books, visit the MICA store website shortly before the semester begins.) We will also view the first three of the five seasons of "The Wire".

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

NSCI 201A Scientific Readings: Astronomy 3 credits
In this course, students are introduced first to the fundamentals of astronomy, and building on that foundation, and through the wonders of NASA’s Hubble Telescope, to the wild, wonderful, absolutely beautiful and profoundly mysterious nature of the universe. We shall explore its strange realities as revealed through modern physics. Supernovas, the Big Bang, neutron stars, black holes, extrasolar planets, and even our own tiny solar system. In a lucid manner suitable for the non-specialist, we will explore the impact of quantum theory, elementary particle theory and relativity on our understanding of perhaps the deepest questions of modern science: What is the origin of the universe and where, if anywhere, is it headed? Does the universe have meaning? Is there life on other planets? What is the meaning of time and eternity? Who are we and how did we get here?

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 201B Scientific Rdgs: Earth Science 3 credits
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Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 201C Scientific Rdgs: Climatology 3 credits
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Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 201D Scientific Rdgs: Human Anatomy 3 credits
3 credits. Robinson. Offered fall. The focus of this course is to understand basic components of human anatomy, including gross and microscopic anatomy. It intends to discuss not only skin, muscle and skeletal systems, but also the nervous system, large organs, immunity and developmental anatomy. Related variations in human anatomy due to aging and certain illnesses will be discussed as well. This course overlaps somewhat with NSCI 220 General Biology, so students should take either one but not both.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 201E Scientific Readings: Physics 3 credits
This course examines the physics of phenomena that make up the world we live in: both the built environment and the natural environment. Visualization will be emphasized as a principal tool for understanding and cross-referencing concepts in Physics and Mathematics. Students will learn about the strength of materials, material behavior, the physics behind phenomena that are critical to the environment and to evaluate these important facts surrounding us. The course is intended to provide Artists and Designers a working knowledge of physical phenomena and their analysis, and to support interests such as those in built form whether in Sculpture or Architecture, and in environmental issues such as Sustainability and Climate Change.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 210 Environmental Science 3 credits
This course promotes a comprehensive understanding of humankind’s interactions (both positive and negative) with the local, regional, and global environment. The first portion of the course provides a tour of earth’s major environmental compartments, including the hydrosphere, lithosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Emphasis is placed on the interconnected nature of each compartment. The second portion of the course highlights in greater depth environmental issues of current and emerging importance. Student-selected discussion topics will be key components of this course.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 215 Big Ideas in Science 3 credits
Looks at the major advances in science in the last 500 hundred years, focusing particularly on the 20th century. Newton’s laws, Einstein's theories, quantum mechanics, and string theory are explored. These ideas affect not only our understanding of the universe, but also our understanding of our cultures and ourselves. Fulfills natural science requirement.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 229 Biodiversity 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. An introduction to the science of biodiversity. We examine the history of biodiversity as well as current issues, with an emphasis on building the understanding needed to be advocates for the natural world. Topics of discussion include levels of biodiversity; measuring and mapping biodiversity; dispersal and succession; the fossil record and evolution of major groups; the scope of present-day biodiversity; the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem health; species concepts, speciation, and extinction; conservation biology; and restoration ecology.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 237 Mathematics as Experience 3 credits
This course will cover a variety of topics in mathematics. The goal is to impart an understanding of the range of mathematical ideas, to be appreciated as a useful tool, as a language, and as a work of art in itself. We will cover the history and development of the subject through lectures, class discussion, and hands-on work. As learning can take place only through doing, students will be directed in actively solving problems. Topics will include the vocabulary of mathematics, the structure of numbers, the development of analytic rigor, concepts of infinity, abstraction, symmetry, and others.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 244 Objectivity 3 credits
Does “objectivity” have a history, or even multiple histories? Through close readings and case studies in the history of medicine and science, the course explores how things become known to the world, how consensus becomes fact, and how (often) knowledge is unmade. Topics include: the rise of statistical thinking; objectivity in physics; rational thought and monsters; the move from pathological anatomy to the clinic; and debates between philosophy and science about perception. The aim is for students to gain sophistication in their reading of individual texts, and to synthesize concepts between scientific domains and historical periods. Prerequisite: Credit earned or concurrent enrollment in LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 256 Found. Scientific World View 3 credits
3 credits. Waddell. Offered occasionally. A course in science for non-practitioners. Starting from Newton’s description of gravitation, the course explores the role of mathematical models as the foundation of modern science. Students should achieve some degree of mathematical intuition and an understanding of the scope and limitations of the realm of science. Topics include light and color, harmonics, motion, higher-dimensional spaces, uncertainty, and the nature of scientific theories. A background in higher mathematics is not assumed or required.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

NSCI 260 Logic 3 credits
Logic concerns the forms and criteria of correct reasoning. This course begins with an introduction to infomal fallacies and critical thinking, and proceeds toward the beginning of sentential and predicate logic. By its end, you will think more clearly, read more critically, and argue more effectively.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PERF 200X Co-Op Performance/Theater 3 credits
Performance/Theater Studies electives taken through BSEP.
PERF 250-IH1 History of Western Theatre 3 credits
This course will introduce students to the discipline of theatre history, focusing attention upon some of the most notable events, performances, and artifacts of the Western tradition. Students will learn to undertake the labor and practices of the theatre historian and will be encouraged to consider live performance as the most important—yet most ephemeral—primary document to unearth and analyze. The course will consider theatre and performance from a variety of eras, including Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, as well as styles such as Realist, Modernist and Absurdist theatre. In addition to written scholarly discourse, students will be asked to call upon their studio skills through a theatrical design project which challenges students’ historical knowledge and analytical abilities.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

PERF 303 The Play’s the Thing 3 credits
Entry by audition (cast) and application/interview (tech crew) only. The Play’s the Thing students will earn six credits, three academic and three studio, in Humanistic Studies Elective PERF303 (all students) and either studio elective FA303.01 Production (actors, stage managers, assistant director, assistant producer, costumers, publicists) or FA303.02 Technical Design (set, lighting, sound, prop designers, technicians and fabricators). Students selected for the cast and crew will become Spring 2013 members of The Rivals of the West, MICA’s theater company that stages ticketed dramatic performances for the public in BBOX each spring . The Play’s the Thing spring 2013 production is Brian Friel’s Dancing at Lughnasa. The play will run for eight performances: April 4, 5, 6, 7 and April 11, 12, 13, 14. Dancing at Lughnasa requires a cast of 8 (5 women, 3 men) and an extensive technical crew, including stage managers; assistant directors; assistant producers; set, lighting and sound designers, technicians and fabricators; costumer designers and fabricators; prop designers and fabricators; makeup artists; and publicists (designers and marketers) among others. Auditions and the application/interview process will take place this fall on November 12, 13 and 14, 9:30-11:30 p.m., in BBOX. Auditioning and applying students will be informed of their entry status on November 16, before online registration takes place for the spring semester. All students interested in auditioning and applying for The Play’s the Thing must contact Christopher Shipley, cshipley@mica.edu, as soon as possible for additional important information and to request audition/application materials and instructions.

Concurrent enrollment FA 303 required, totalling 6 credits. Enrollment by ermission of Instructor.

PERF 318-TH Multicultural Theatre 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the concepts of theatre arts as they function within selected African, Asian, Caribbean, and American societies. The plays selected introduce a varied number of styles, political orientations, structural concepts, and ideas about the human condition. The course is designed to encourage the recognition of the need to construct cultural perspectives within contemporary societies and not to assume that the logic of western cultures is either inherently correct or structurally superior to non-Western dramatic art forms. The class is conducted studio-style with dramatic readings, individual/group analyses, and performance requirements. Some original writing, a take home mid-term and a final are also required.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

PERF 380 Performance Poetry 3 credits
This is an introductory course for students interested in continuing to develop their writing, acting, vocal/speech and performance/movement skills. The course uses a workshop format to do both body related exercises and cognitive exercises. The instructional goal is for students to develop their critical thinking skills and be more comfortable speaking to and performing in front of people in a way that represents the best version of their authentic selves.Multiple texts include From Totems to Hip Hop: A Multicultural Anthology of Poetry Across the Americas, 1900-2002. Requirements include writing and performing both original and published poems in the classroom and in more public spaces and writing 1 analytical essay and 1 analytical peer review essay.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

PHIL 204-IH1 Music & Western Thought 3 credits
Beginning with Plato, Western thought has reflected on the nature of music in order to address concerns that are not merely aesthetic. This course traces the history of philosophical thinking about music—polyphonic music in particular. Why is it that Western thinkers have constantly inquired about the enigma of music in order to answer questions concerning order in the universe, concerning harmony in the state, the “Dionysian” origins of tragedy, the nature of myth and eros, and more recently, the relation of language to meaning? This is not a history of music course, but a course in how seminal Western thinkers have focused on music in order to answer genuinely philosophical problems. No background in music is required, though students must be prepared to listen to a lot of music. The course covers Plato and the ancients on music; Renaissance thinkers on polyphony and harmony; parallels between Leibniz and the music of Bach; parallels between Hegel and Beethoven; Kierkegaard on Mozart and seduction; Schopenhauer and Nietzsche in relation to the music of Wagner; Schoenberg, Thomas Mann, and the philosophy of Adorno; Wittgenstein on music and language; and Levi-Strauss on music and myth. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 205-IH1 Medieval/Renaissance Phil. 3 credits
This course examines ancient and early medieval philosophy primarily through the major works of Plato and Aristotle, but with Augustine and Aquinas as well. Our focus will be primarily on Plato and Aristotle as they, in many ways, set the agenda for many of the questions still thought fundamental to philosophical inquiry though they approached these questions in a distinctive spirit from that of most modern philosophers. In particular, they thought of philosophy less as a conceptual exercise and more as a way of life indeed, as the best way. The main topics we will cover in our effort to make sense of Plato and Aristotle will be: ethical virtue and its relation to the good life (happiness), the soul and its relation to the body, and the objects and nature of knowledge. The main topics to be taken up with regard to Augustine and Aquinas, who are primarily concerned with the Fall and our possibility of salvation are: sex, death, time and free will. Throughout we will make an effort to flech out the nature of the social and political climate that set the stage for these philosophers and their ideas.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 232-IH1 Classical Greek & Roman Philos 3 credits
The ancient Greek world, and the adoption and mutation of its intellectual traditions by the Romans, provide seminal ideas at the basis of Western civilization. This course will examine the roots and progression of that tradition through its heyday and demise, culminating with its early transformations by Christian thought. We will cover some of the well known writings of major philosophers of this period, including Plato, Aristotle, Seneca, Lucretius, and Augustine, and consider the historical, political, religious and literary trends to which they responded and which molded their thought in turn. This means we will also sample from texts of Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Cicero, and Julius Caesar, among others.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 233-IH1 Classical Greek Philosophy 3 credits
Early Greek Philosophers posed the fundamental questions that have dominated philosophy for the past two millenia: What is the good? What is happiness? How can I attain happiness? What is the best political arrangement for humans? Is the human soul unique and immortal? What is justice, and why is the pursuit of real justice so often inimical to everyday society? We will explore these and other essential questions in reading from Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus among others, and some of the Greek tragedians.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 251-IH2 Age of Rationalism&Empiricism 3 credits
The topic of this course involves one of the most significant debates in Western philosophy—one that emerges in the period following the Renaissance, starts with the question of the origins of human knowledge, but blossoms into larger controversies concerning the makeup of the human mind, the essence of personal identity, the relations between body and soul, the limits of knowledge, and the possibility of religious faith. Various voices considered in this debate include those of Descartes, Spinoza, Pascal, Hume, and Berkeley. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 259-IH2 Modern Philosophy 3 credits
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Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 260-IH2 History of Existentialism 3 credits
Examines the development of Existentialism from its roots in the 19th century with thinkers such as Nietzsche and Dostoyevsky to its emergence as a major philosophical movement in the aftermath of the First World War. Students consider the basic elements of the philosophy, its aesthetic implications, and its applications in the fields of psychology and political science as a philosophy of moral freedom. Writers studied include Nietzsche, Dostoyevsky, Sartre, Camus, Hemingway, Kafka, Fanon, de Beauvoir, and others. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 261-IH2 Moral Philosophy of Modernity 3 credits
Covers the major influences, statements, and debates in Western moral thought from the end of the Renaissance through the 19th century. It explores the continuity and changes in various approaches to questions concerning the best way to live, the social duties we have, and the manner of ethical motivation. The course begins by examining the influence of Stoicism and the Reformation on the Christian moral paradigm of the Middle Ages, following with the emergence of Enlightenment ethical ideals, and concluding with the critique and rejection of the reigning moral paradigms and their religious, cultural, and philosophical foundations in the 19th century. Among the writers examined are Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, and Nietzsche. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 277-IH2 The Scientific Revolution 3 credits
The period since the Renaissance has known a remarkable rush of scientific advances culminating in unparalleled conveniences in human history. This course texts that chronicle the major advances of this period, with a view to the development of the scientific method that made these advances possible, the socio-political forces that encouraged particular innovations and areas of research, and of course, the effect and reception of these advances as they emerged. Prerequisite: LA 101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

PHIL 310-TH What is Beauty? 3 credits
The course explores this basic question and auxiliary questions concerning the relation of beauty to subjectivity, time and the timeless, purpose and purposelessness, the relative and the universal, desire, pleasure, artifice, cosmetics, and death. Classic philosophical treatments of the nature of beauty will be encountered in Plato, Plotinus, Kant,Schiller and contemporary re-considerations of beauty in the theories of Nehemas and Sartwell. Our reflections will be deepened and provoked by the writings of Keats, Baudelaire, Mann, Stevens, Ashbery, and by pertinent films.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 317-TH Media Ethics 3 credits
We live in a media-infested world; our whole lives are subjected to media transmission of some form or another: TV, film, advertisements, newspapers, the internet. In light of this fact about 21st century culture - and the significant role of artists and designers in shaping those media- it is necessary to consider the moral and political impact and influence of the various media. Do films incline us to violence? Do ads incline us to anorexia? Do newspapers incline us to Republicanism? Underlying these concerns is the larger one about the media's relation to truth and accuracy. Ought the media be objective? Can they be objective? What hidden agendas do the media betray, and how do they betray them? Also, how do the media persuade, compel ... control?

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 322-TH Language &Limits of Understand 3 credits
This is a course in the philosophy of language and interpretation (hermeneutics). We examine what it is to understand a language, and then go on to address fundamental problems in the understanding of oneself, others, and beings who are “wholly other” like gods, or devils as the case may be. Some of the questions addressed in the seminar are: Does the fact that we speak a particular language (that we are situated in a specific culture at a certain time) preclude us from understanding persons who express themselves in a different language, persons with “conceptual schemes” that seem radically different from ours? How does a community based upon an authoritative text, like the Bible or the U.S. Constitution, handle unbridgeable conflicts in interpretation? Why would a god speak to human beings in figures, in a concealed or riddling manner? And how are we to understand such veiled language? Are there certain times when we must be unintelligible to others and even to ourselves? Are there conditions of our humanity which by their nature resist understanding? The thinkers we read include: Heidegger, Heraclitus, Herodotus, Saint Augustine, Montaigne, Kierkegaard, Gadamer, Sartre, Davidson, Wittgenstein, Simmel, MacIntyre, Rorty, Levi-Strauss, Freud, Fricker, Nagel, and Justices of the Supreme Court. Literature includes selections from: Bible, Talmud, Shakespeare, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Tolstoy, Kafka, Proust, Handke, Delillo, Whitman, Dickinson, Celan.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 325-TH Theories of Madness 3 credits
This class will be based around a series of short stories dealing with murder, madness, mystery and the supernatural, from the 19th century to the present day, with an emphasis on the contemporary era. We will address issues pertaining to the short story form (language, structure, style, tone) as well as content (why are dark and sinister themes so well suited to the short story format?). Subjects covered will include ghost stories, mysteries, tales of the occult, detective stories and first person fantasies. Texts will include stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Wilkie Collins, M.R. James, Sheridan Lafanu, Ambrose Bierce, Herman Melville, Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Mann, Tennessee Williams, and Katherine Mansfield.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 328-TH Psychology of Art 3 credits
This course will consider the relationship between psychology and the creative arts, with a focus on the aesthetics of personal taste and perception, dreams, fantasy, symbols, subjectivity, identity, sexuality and the unconscious. We will look at the psychodynamics of the creative process and consider the motives behind creation. We will also consider the domain of aesthetics and metaphysics experience, with particular attention to how psychoanalysis can help us understand the phenomenon of the personal aesthetic. Attention will also be paid to art therapy, the Rorshach test, and the relationship between creativity, personality characteristics and emotional functioning.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 329-TH Deep Ecology: Environ. Ethic 3 credits
Are we merely in nature, or intimately part of it? What do we owe the earth, and may we take any liberties with her? How can we figure nature and its members into our moral community, or extend moral thinking to include it? What have been the traditional obstacles of such a project, and what present challenges - practical and ideological - face it now? Students consider such questions among others in exploring literature of ecological consciousness and an emerging environmental ethic. The guides in this course include Thoreau, Lao Tzu, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Arne Naess, and Peter Singer.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 342 Philosophy and Fiction 3 credits
This course will examine the fundamental themes and principles of Existential Philosophy and Buddhism with the intention of illustrating how philosophical themes can be expressed in the narrative of novels. Readings will include selections from Soren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche, the Dhammapada of Buddhism, Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays, Graham Greene’s A Burnt Out Case, Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha, and Jack Kerouac’s The Dharma Bums.

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 200 level or higher.

PHIL 348-TH Nietzsche in His Time and Ours 3 credits
The course introduces students to key ideas of Nietzsche: "God is dead," Dionysian art, eternal recurrence, beyond good and evil, nihilism, the will to power, the diagnosis and overcoming of resentment, the superman. Nietzsche's influence on artists, writers, and philosophers of the last century is considered as we ask what significance Nietzsche's thought may have for us in the 21st century.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 349-TH Psychopathology 3 credits
This course will consider some of the major so-called psychopathologies, addressing their psychodynamics, their developmental antecedents, and their cultural underpinnings. We will think about some of the ways in which creativity and psychological pain can illuminate each other, and how we can understand (and fail to understand) psychological suffering. We will consider some of the ethical questions that arise in these circumstances. We will discuss what the insights of creative artists can bring to the relationship between psychopathology and emotional experience. We will also address the insights that the reading and writing of case studies can give us into the human condition, suffering, and our responsibility to one another, particularly when such studies encourage us to develop and nurture observation, analysis, empathy, and self-reflection, to which language and narrative are fundamental.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 353-TH Bioethics 3 credits
Explores the field of bioethics. Students examine basic moral theory in the writings of Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Mill, and others and review the principal philosophical concepts (autonomy, personhood, justice, beneficence) underpinning ethical considerations as they influence medical research and practice. Special attention is paid to medical ethics history, from Hippocrates to contemporary medical ethics policies and regulations. The course includes case studies and case presentations that identify ethical conflicts, present options, recommend resolutions, and defend/challenge decisions.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 371-TH Contemporary Political Theory 3 credits
This course will look at issues and authors prominent in 20th and 21st century political theory. Questions we will consider include: what is the role and place of religion in the modern liberal democracies? How shall liberal democracies negotiate multi-culturalism, and integrating not so liberal populations? What is the relationship of violence to the modern state? What roles should the government play in alleviating poverty and social ills, and what specific policies are most effective? Why does our democracy in particular suffer increasing apathy, and how does that compare to other regimes? Authors we read may include Charles Taylor, Michel Foucault, Hannah Arendt, Michael Oakeshott, Isaiah Berlin, Martha Nussbaum, among others.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 382-TH ZooOntologies 3 credits
This is a junior theory course in which students will engage with the emerging field of animal studies. We will consider the role played by non-humans in the field of cultural studies, social theory, philosophy and literature. In particular, we will study the history of animal representations in the Western literary tradition, in film, and in popular culture. We will also consider the social and cultural implications of pet-keeping, dog shows, animal sacrifice, scientific experimentation, taxidermy, hunting, fur-wearing and meat-eating. We will study recent films, novels, and cultural events that reveal how our interaction with non-human animals shapes our understanding of the human.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 383-TH Image, Time, Movement: Deleuze 3 credits
Proposes to study Gilles Deleuze’s philosophy by looking closely at his writings on the temporal art of cinema, and to a lesser extent, his writings on music. To understand Deleuze’s theory of these arts, the course examines his general concepts of movement, time, and the image. Since this aspect of Deleuze’s thinking is strongly influenced by his reception of Bergson, study also includes relevant texts by this somewhat neglected philosopher. Classwork includes the viewing of films. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course. Open to qualified undergraduates as well as graduate students.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

PHIL 435 Art Meets Ecology 3 credits
Cross listed with AH 435. The poet, Rainer Maria Rilke, suggests “the artist’s task is to imprint the temporary earth into ourselves so deeply and passionately that it can rise again inside us”. Sculptor Jackie Bookner echoes Thomas Berry’s belief that our own actions are truly creative only when we surrender to the intimate experiencing of the primacy of the natural world and its spontaneous functioning in all we do (Art Journal, Vol. 51, No. 2, Summer 1992). Students in this interdisciplinary course will explore these ideas through ecological field studies at Baltimore’s herring Run Park. Their research into basic ecological principles (energy flow, cycling of matter, adaptations/ changes in form and interrelationships) will serve as the foundation for an inquiry into the relationships between self and the natural world and between close observation and the impulse to create. Lectures, field experience and notebook, independent project and written critique form the basis of this class. Prerequisites: AH 100 and 201, LA 101.

This is a 6 credit course. Concurrent enrollment in AH 435 required. Prerequisite: AH 201 and HMST 101.

RELG 222-IH1 Eastern Phil. & Religion 3 credits
Examines classical texts and writings of the major thinkers of ancient India and China, with a view to understanding the intellectual foundations and development of these respective cultures. Readings include, among others, students read the Upanishads and the Bhagavad-Gita, the Buddha’s Sermons and biography, Confucius’ Analects, and the Tao te Ching. The class examines the centuries-long discussion between these thinkers regarding such fundamental philosophical topics as the structure of reality, the nature of the human self, the religious issues of destiny of the soul and the existence and nature of God, and the moral and political concerns of human social duties and proper techniques of ruling. In surveying this long exchange of ideas, students consider the historical forces that shaped and prompted these ideas, and the historical influences that they in turn imparted. Prerequisite: HMST101.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

RELG 270-IH1 History of Buddhism 3 credits
This course will examine the fundamental themes and principles of Buddhist philosophy, beginning with the early life experiences of Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha), continuing through the development of the Hinayana and Mahayana schools of Buddhism, and culminating in the philosophy and way-of-life of Zen Buddhism. Texts will include: The Dhammapada, The Heart of the Buddha, and Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

RELG 360-TH Religion & Storytelling 3 credits
This course will examine how stories and storytelling combine entertainment and instruction to create, reflect, transform and sustain different religious contexts and the beings that inhabit them. We will use stories from various religions and cultures as opportunities to learn about diverse ways of experiencing, imagining and understanding existence in the world. Through specific examples from Native American, South Asian and European-American storytelling traditions, student will encounter Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim and indigenous religious traditions. We will also focus upon the act of storytelling, and study how different modes of human communication and relationship affect religious experience. Concepts for inquiry will include truth, belief, religion, and culture. As we encounter the content of stories and the role of storytellers we will also think about creation, healing, gender roles, resistance, empowerment, and socialization.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

RELG 369-TH Religion& American Consumerism 3 credits
This course explores religion and ways of being religious through juxtaposing locative and utopian ways of inhabiting material worlds. Discussions consider the cultural distances between western and indigenous ways of life, and how religious ideas inform and shape cross-cultural modes of consumption. Readings focus on Mesoamerican religious rituals, Guatemalan woman's life, development of consumerism and its spaces in America, an economic hitman's confessions, and commodification of religion through popular culture. The course encourages students to think creatively about religion and to challenge themselves to think critically as well as self-reflectively about their own culture. Is consumerism a way of life? What does consumerism reveal about Western culture and its core values?

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

RELG 465 Raja Yoga, Spirituality & Art 3 credits
This course will investigate the nature of human consciousness and the creative imagination from the viewpoint of Raja Yoga (the practice of meditation and self knowledge), the spiritual vision of Wassily Kandinsky and the place of the artist in that vision, and the Japanese aesthetic sensibility of Wabi Sabi. Readings will include The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (Swami Satchidananda commentary), Concerning the Spiritual in Art (Wassily Kandinsky), and Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence (Andrew Juniper).

Prerequisite: One Academic course at the 300 level or higher.

SSCI 202 Personal & Abnormal Psychology 3 credits
Surveys personality theories, various concepts of psychological adjustment, and models of mental health. Specifically, the students examine bio-psycho-social foundations of human personality theories, and normal and deviant human behaviors. The class format includes lectures, discussions, and case studies. Fulfills social science requirement.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 215 Social Problems: Anthro View 3 credits
Investigates contemporary cultural scenes through the study of newspapers, periodicals, tests, media, and guest speakers. Students concentrate on the important cultural markers of postmodern society: violence, ethnic relations, gender roles, ecology, and alternate belief and healing systems. Formerly titled Anthropology of Postmodernism. Fulfills social science requirement.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 220 Anthropological Readings 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts, methods and perspectives of the social sciences with special attention to cultural anthropology and the study of cultural groups, including native peoples of South and Central America and Native Americans and indigenous peoples of the North. No prerequisite. Fulfills social science requirement.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 228 The Genesis of Anthropology 3 credits
This course answers the questions who, what and the how’s regarding the board discipline of Anthropology. It differs greatly in its scope from the rest of Humanities due to its “Holistic Approach” stressing Culture and its influence on all human behavior. Although the sub-groups are specialized, Anthropology is about “The People”. Join the journey as archeologists, primatologists , physical and cultural anthropologists enter unknown locations around the world. We will investigate numerous indigenous cultures with pathfinders as they unravel and collect data and build theories regarding humankind. After collecting fieldwork information and living with numerous societies searching for different cultural traits and behavior, we will discover how Anthropology has evolved and presently identifies the universality of being human.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 229 Social Cognition 3 credits
Several books appeared, and became NY Times bestsellers, in recent years that attempted to examine human potential and societal issues, such as Blink and What the Dog Saw by Malcolm Gladwell and Hidden Brain by Shankar Vedantam. They discuss contemporary issues that confront us, including implicit racial bias, bystander apathy, the myth of innate ability, to mention a few. These are fascinating topics and a nontraditional psychological analysis often reveals issues that are often not obvious by rational analysis. Other issues that may be addressed include crimes and criminal personality, subliminal influences, and even alien abduction and past life regression from a scientific standpoint.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 235 Women and Sexuality 3 credits
This course will examine the shifting history and politics of women's sexuality in the United States. We will explore how sexual behavior and the meanings of sexuality have changed over time and how they have varied depending on race and class. We also analyze how second-wave feminism has altered how our society views and contests female sexuality. This course places female sexuality in the context of broader shifts in American history and culture.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 239 Tribal Societies 3 credits
An anthropological journey exploring the realm of indigenous cultures around the world. Taking a holistic approach, students weave the paths of adaptation that form these cultures by investigating their environment, values, beliefs, rituals, and socio-economic systems. It is important to be aware of these cultures to attain a view of our past and understand the multitude of problems of contemporary tribal peoples.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 240 Perception and Cognition 3 credits
Perception is the process through which sensations are interpreted, using knowledge and understanding of the world, so that they become meaningful experiences. Thus, perception is not a passive process or simply absorbing and decoding incoming sensations. People fill in missing information and draw on past experience to give meaning to what they see, hear, touch, smell, or taste. No prerequisite. Fulfills social science requirement.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 245-IH1 Warfare&PeaceinPre-StateCultrs 3 credits
This course investigates the world views, practices, issues and concerns of pre-literate cultures regarding the age-old question--Is humankind innately aggressive or peaceful? The emphasis of the data will reflect a holistic/systemic view of several well-researched tribal societies such as the Warani, Basami, Yanamamo, Pygmies, Tunga, Arunta and the !Kung Bushmen.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 253-IH2 History of Mind&Consciousness 3 credits
The course explores the history of thinking about the origin and nature of mind, consciousness, and cognition, as well as the history of the science of psychology and the study of abnormal behavior. After a brief introduction to the science of mind that includes the thoughts of ancient and 17th and 18th century philosophers, we will focus on the modern history of psychology as seen though its major systems or schools of thought, such as functionalism, structuralism, behaviorism, psychoanalysis, Gestalt, and existentialism. We will examine the changing attitudes about the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness in the United States as well as look at the depiction of psychology in modern cultural artifacts (including print and screen). We will look at the future of psychology in terms of the focus today on the brain as the origin of mental disorder and drugs as the cure for almost every psychological ill.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 254 Death and Dying: Last Frontier 3 credits
Humankind has always been in wonder of the mysteries of death and the possibilities of an after-life. Dying and death is an inevitable part of the sacred circle of life. This topic is of particular interest and often an obsession for the imaginative and creative art student. This class will examine this topic taking a multi-media cross-cultural comparative approach stressing ritual, spiritual practices and world views. Our classroom will reflect "common-unity" within a sacred space; an environment of enlightenment on a multiplicity of levels. The goal of this revived course is to gain a greater understanding and awareness of this rite of passage theat we must all face and it's impact on society, familty, and friends, and the "star" of the drama, the individual. Come share and experience the journey.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 275-IH2 Native American Studies 3 credits
This course is an introduction to Native American studies with a particular focus on Native American religion. Like other indigenous religions around the world, Native American religions permeate the entire way of life, and their cultural expressions are enormously rich and creative. Native American religion expands usual definitions of world’s great religions by including relationships to land and spiritual dimensions of the material world. The land has religious meaning, and the natural environment is ultimately sacred. Readings focus on Mesoamerican, Lakota (Sioux) and Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) traditions. Students will explore Native American cosmovisions, creation stories, giving thanks prayers, vision quests, and ceremonial culture. Readings, films, and discussions address such critical issues as colonization and its consequences for Native Americans, sovereignty, freedom of religion, land rights, responses to climate change and globalization. The course invites students to reflect upon the contentious history of inter-cultural contact between indigenous and immigrant people of the Americas.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 285 Celebrity 3 credits
What is celebrity, and how does one acquire it? Celebrity is not purely a twentieth century phenomenon. This course will track the history of celebrity and charisma, from Alexander the Great to current movie and television stars. We will consider the social, cultural and psychological issues surrounding fame and notoriety, and look at how and why cultures are compelled to create and worship their own celebrities. The course will include a series of film screenings.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 287 Poverty & Homelessness 3 credits
Students will explore 4 major aspects of the subject: history, current policy, artistic representation/response and community engagement. The first will introduce students to a historical survey of poverty and homelessness in the US; focus will be placed on Victorian era approaches in addition to the Great Depression. The second will segue into the recent history of poverty/homelessness and current debates and issues, such as addictions, housing, mental health, deserving and undeserving poor, and international comparisons. Discussions will be enhanced by multi-media overlays which would include music, visuals and guest speakers. The third will grow out of such presentations but will focus on the works of various artists, filmmakers, novelists, among others. The final aspect to be investigated will b structured class presentations where students will share information about their semester-long volunteering at a local non-profit/charity involved with the homeless or the disenfranchised (to be co-organized with CAP).

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 306-TH Capitalism and Its Critics 3 credits
Since the fall of the Communist regimes 20 years ago, it has largely been taken for granted that the Capitalist economic system is supreme. This is, however, a new phenomenon; for most of its history, Capitalism was not supreme, but knew concerted competition. Furthermore, in light of the recent- and shocking- credit crisis that rocked the global economy, Capitalism?s supremacy has again come into question. Perhaps, many critics have wondered, it is time to reconsider our full embrace of bare-knuckled capitalism- perhaps it is time to consider subtler variations. In this course we will look at the theories behind- and against- Capitalism, that have shaped it through its history, to produce the multiform beast it is today. Some of the authors we read may include Adam Smith, Marx, Engels, Ayn Rand, Keynes, Friedman, Hayek, E. F. Schumacher.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

SSCI 316 Belief Systems:Alternate Paths 3 credits
Offers artists a means to explore their curiosity about such topics as magic, witchcraft, voodoo, the occult, and other beliefs within an anthropological setting.

Prerequisite: Earned credit or concurrent enrollment in HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry)

SSCI 321 Creativity and Community 3 credits
Examines the relationship between art practice and community building, drawing from the work of Paolo Freire and Saul Alinsky, as well as Kenneth Koch’s and Wendy Ewald’s work with children. Students study the use of poetry, theatre, improvisation, and photography in collaboration with communities who are engaged in the work of self-definition and cultural expression. Participants also work with students and parents on collaborative projects that are publicly exhibited. CAP course.
SSCI 323-TH Globalization & Its Discontent 3 credits
Our world seems to be getting ever smaller: natural disasters in one part of the planet reverberate around the globe; American fast food can be enjoyed in most every nation; information streams electronically across the earth in a matter of seconds. Is this a good thing, this “globalization”? Some think it is. Some simply think it’s inevitable. And some react with immense anxiety and animosity. Why such an uproar over globalization? First of all, what is globalization exactly? It is a rather nebulous term, in fact, made so by the immensity of its scope: globalization refers to an amalgam of political, economic, cultural, and social theories. This course aims to explore the various incarnations and aspects of globalization, in order to amass some definition of it. Evaluates globalization as a theory and considers the many compelling criticisms of it, as well as its real and possible consequences. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

SSCI 345-TH Activism and Social Theory 3 credits
3 credits. Staff. Offered occasionally. Efforts to understand human society have always been linked to activist struggles to achieve social change. This course examines some of the major social theories of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Marxism, critical theory, and postmodernism. Students consider the influence of these ideas on social movements such as the labor movement, the student movement of the 1960s and the anti-globalization movement and discuss the ways in which the form, content, and goals of activist efforts evolve in connection with ideas from philosophers and social scientists. Prerequisites: One IH1 and one IH2 course.

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

SSCI 376-TH Urban Theory 3 credits
The aim of this class is to obtain new knowledge of the city by conducting critical “listenings” of the city of Baltimore. Throughout the semester, students identify, research, and then experiment with various experimental, exploratory tactics, including (but not limited to) the ambulatory drift (as practiced by the Surrealists) the derive (as practiced by the Situationists), stalking (as practiced by Yoko Ono), flânerie (as practiced by Walter Benjamin), Rhythmanalysis (as practiced by Henri Lefebvre), urban detective work (as practiced by Phillip Marlowe and Jake Geddes), and actor-network theory (as practiced by Bruno Latour). While the pedagogic intent of this course therefore tends towards the epistemic, ultimately, the point is to encourage artists, architects, activists, and the like to engage their cities in ways that resist our predefined notions of what the city is or should be. Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

Prerequisite: 3 credits of IH1 and 3 credits of IH2

SSCI 476 Stages of Life:Cross-Cultural 3 credits
This course examines and cross-culturally compares the concepts and associated rituals surrounding the life crises events of birth, puberty, marriage and death. In addition, the material will reflect the phenomena of initiation into secret societies, the military, fraternity hazing, college graduation, and mid-life crises.

Prerequisite: HMST 101 (Critical Inquiry) or Permission of Instructor.

SSCI 485 Conflict and Coexistence 3 credits
The course introduces students to research and studio practice surrounding the topic of settlement patterns and strategies in the Middle East, from the origins of town life to the contemporary period. Topical discussions will focus on issues like settlement patterns and lifeways in the Middle East; the importance of nomadic pastoralists and other “alternatives” to patterns of sedentism; the role of geography and natural resources; behavioral and cultural reactions to stressed geographies and ideas of sustainability; interaction of different settlement/behavioral patterns through time, the art and architecture of early city dwellers, and survivals of traditional lifeways in the contemporary era. The weekly six-hour course meeting will be divided in to lecture and discussion periods, and studio-based practica involving mapping, modeling, and other environmental design techniques.

This is a 6 credit course. Concurrent enrollment in AH 485 is required. Prerequisite: AH 201