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Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Art Curriculum (2013-14)

Requirements for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Arts
Course TitleCourse #Credits
Post-Baccalaureate Critique and Seminar I PB 400 6
Post-Baccalaureate Critique and Seminar II PB 401 6
Electives (includes studio, art history, or graduate seminar theory/criticism)   18

Total Credits for the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Art: 30

Course Descriptions

Post-Baccalaureate Critique and Seminar I

PBP 400

6 credits

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Schmidt, staff. Offered fall. Students are assisted in developing a personal direction in their chosen medium through a series of works developed over the semester. Individual and group critiques occur weekly, as well as critiques by visiting artists. Attendance is required. A minimum of 18 hours of work per week is expected. Emphasis is also placed on speaking and writing about, and documenting one’s own work. A thesis statement, résumé, bio, slides, and a group exhibit are part of the final presentation. Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate students only. Grade basis: pass/fail.

Post-Baccalaureate Critique and Seminar II

PBP 401

6 credits

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Schmidt, staff. Offered spring. A continuation of PBP 400. A minimum of 18 hours of work per week is expected. The seminar covers professional topics such as grants, residencies, studios, and galleries. Students produce a revised statement, résumé, biography, and slides based on their exploration of these topics as they are related to their work and participate in a group exhibit. Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate students only. Grade basis: pass/fail.

Personal Narrative

PBP 471

3 credits

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Tisa. Offered fall. Aids students in their quest for understanding who they are as artists, where their work comes from, and the importance of tapping into the inner self to find a creative vision. Attention will be given to art-making from various cultural perspectives: tribal cultures of Africa, shamanism, and the art of Asia, as well as contemporary issues in the art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Students are encouraged to abandon preconceptions about art-making and their personal identity as artists. Through readings, films, and lectures, topics such as time, myth, and the body and its senses are introduced and provide an umbrella under which the student can roam in any direction. There are no restrictions on medium, form, or imagery. The work done in this class is meant to tie into and enrich the independent work students are already doing in their studios. Prerequisite: Post-baccalaureate students only. Grade basis: pass/fail.

Ideas, Perception, Metaphors, Materials

PBP 474

3 credits

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Plattner. Offered spring. This studio course explores the relationships between ideas, materials, and processes in studio work through the vehicle of metaphor. Students look at the role of visual metaphor in art by studying both historic and contemporary paintings and drawings. In parallel, the role of verbal metaphor in literature is investigated by reading some short poems and one short novella. The final goal of the course is for each student to develop an individual body of work in which the idea of metaphor plays a central role, tying into and enriching the independent work they are already doing in their studios. Grade basis: pass/fail.

Post-Baccalaureate Seminar in Critical Theory

L 5000

3 credits

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Peacock. Offered spring. Students learn to deal with complex, sometimes abstruse art theories by asking basic questions about the particular theories and about theory in general, for example: Why does some contemporary art seem theory “driven” and does it need to be? Why does there seem to be no central theoretical “paradigm” in the art world today? Was there ever in times past? What is the relation between multiculturalism and theory? What are some of the conditions that led to the art world being so engaged with theory? Do young artists need to be? What are their options? Will theory ever be eclipsed, or is it here to stay?

English Language Intensive Study

L 5106

3 credits

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Poppleton. Offered occasionally. An intensive language study seminar for international graduate students who need preparation in English reading, speaking, and writing skills in order to continue their study in the United States. This class may be required for students whose score on the TOEFL is less than 550 and is strongly recommended for all graduate students who are not confident in their English language ability. Emphasis is on reading and understanding academic and art critical discourse, both in writing and in oral forms. The course meets as a seminar and requires frequent written and oral reports. Substantial work outside of class is also required. Credits do not count toward the MFA, but may count toward the post-baccaulaureate certificate.