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Curriculum

First Year: Fall

Course Title Credits
Seminar I 3
Practicum I 3
Thesis I - Fieldwork and Research 3
Gateway Graduate Survey of Contemporary Art and Theory 3
Writing for Curators, Artists and Critics 3

First Year: Spring

Course Title Credits
Seminar II 3
Practicum II 6
Thesis II: Proposal 3
Interdisciplinary Approaches to Curatorial Practice 3

Second Year Year: Fall

Course Title Credits
Seminar III 3
Thesis III - Production 6
Graduate Liberal Arts Seminars (2)
6

Second Year Year: Spring

Course Title Credits
Seminar IV 3
Thesis IV - Presentation 6
Graduate Liberal Arts Seminars (2)
6

 

Recommended Electives

Total Credits for the MFA in Curatorial Practice: 60

Course Descriptions

Curatorial Practice Seminar I, II, III, IV
3 Credits each

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Ciscle. Both first and second year students participate in seminar led by the program’s director. This studio course will serve as a laboratory to investigate the process and working methods of exhibition creation, the role and responsibilities of curators, and examine curatorial practice as an artistic, social, and critical pursuit. Workshops and talks with visiting artists, curators and critics will provide critical dialogue, feedback, and encourage exploration and group discussion. Periodic field trips to D.C.-Baltimore-Philadelphia- New York cultural corridor will give students the critical context to analyze both theoretical and historical issues relevant to their individual studio practice.

Practicum I and II
9 credits total

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I. Cudlin. Offered Fall. A studio course for first year students who will collectively research, propose and plan a solo, group or thematic exhibition which includes regional, national and international artists. Within the proposal, students must address how their exhibit, created for and with the Station North Arts community, will engage the diverse audiences of Baltimore. The exhibition’s concept and direction will be arrived at through a cooperative, flexible system of decision-making using physical and digital models, sketches, site visits, video, and renderings.

 

II. Cudlin and Ross. Offered Spring. Continuation of Practicum I. First year students will produce and install their exhibition in the new Studio Center gallery centrally located to the Station North Arts community.

Thesis I: Fieldwork and Research
3 credits

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Ciscle. Offered Fall. First year students will conduct fieldwork to both research and conceive a written/visual proposal for their second year independent thesis project. Tapping opportunities afforded by the program to partner with arts institutions and community arts organizations, students will consider urban public spaces as contexts and environments for presenting art, and explore alternative exhibition designs and education initiatives both within and outside of traditional venues. The proposal, a combination of writing, physical and digital models, sketches, site visits, videos, renderings, and/or maps, must document the student’s fieldwork, and demonstrate the ways the exhibit will connect with the interests, the goals and identity of the site and community in which it is placed.

Thesis II: Proposal
3 credits

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Ciscle. Offered Spring. Proposals will be critiqued and approved by program director and thesis committee.

Thesis III - Production
6 credits

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Ciscle. Offered Fall. Independent studio experience for second year students who will plan and prepare work for thesis project. Each student will organize a self-directed thesis project which is reviewed through critique and discussion by program director, thesis committee and visiting artists, curators and critics.

Thesis IV- Presentation
6 credits

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Ciscle. Offered Spring. A continuation of CP 7556. Concludes in the creation of an individual thesis project, implementation of programming and community outreach, and evaluation by the program director and thesis committee.

Gateway Survey of Contemporary Art, Design and Theory
3 credits

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Hirsh. Offered Fall. Provides an overview of art, architecture, and critical theory from the postwar period to the present. Aims not only to introduce students to artistic movements across the globe but also to critical readings drawn from a wide range of disciplines. As such, the course also generates a rich set of methodological strategies and interpretive practices that equip students with the historical and theoretical tools necessary to advance in subsequent elective courses in art history and theory.

Writing for Artists, Critics and Curators
3 credits

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Lewis. Offered Fall. This course offers an introduction to writing skills for a variety of exhibition situations. The areas of study will cover four diverse styles: the exhibition catalogue essay; interpretative material for the gallery (wall texts, brochures, labels); the press release and marketing texts; grants and exhibition proposals.

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Curatorial Practice
3 credits

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Civin. Offered Spring. Students will be introduced to the history and theory of curatorial practice through a variety of disciplines. Relevant issues to be discussed include the mission and goals of exhibitions, politics and ethics of the art world, and the role of critical analysis in an exhibition's development and assessment process.

Recommended Electives:

Signs, Exhibits, and Spaces
3 credits

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Hoffman. Offered Fall. This course examines the relationship of communication design to the 3d realm. Large scale graphics, signage systems, and exhibition design are explored through a series of projects and presentations. Students will gain skills in developing environments for sharing information. Materials, fabrication processes, and documentation methods will be reviewed.

Connecting Audiences
3 credits

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Blumethal. Offered Spring. This course will consider the principles and methodologies pivotal to providing diverse audiences with meaningful experiences with art and design. Students will develop relevant tools for community engagement, public programming and outreach initiatives. Topics include the artist's and designer's relationship to society, learning theory, audience research and evaluation techniques.


Art and the Law
3 credits

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Lehmann. Spring. In this course, we will examine the ways in which art and the law intersect from a variety of perspectives, including intellectual property, cultural appropriation and freedom of expression. The course is intended to encourage students to consider how art is shaped by legal principles and vice versa. The interplay between art and the law will be explored from historical, cultural, artistic and legal perspectives using a variety of source material. We will begin with basic principles of intellectual property law examined from historical and contemporary points of view. Cultural appropriation and the limits of artistic expression will also be explored. By the end of the course, students will have a working knowledge of intellectual property law concepts and policy issues, and an understanding of the tensions inherent in the interplay between the law and the creative process. This course is open to all students including undergraduate, graduate, and other serious-minded students.