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Nationally-Known Artists and Historians Lecture at MICA This Fall

College Offers Free, Public Talks

Posted 08.19.09 by MICA Media Relations

Mitchell Joachim

BALTIMORE--This fall, MICA brings regional, national and international artists and historians to the College to discuss their work, life and career experiences. Free and open to the public unless otherwise noted, these lectures offer a rare opportunity to learn about the creative process from prominent contemporary figures in the art world.

ART@LUNCH: MITCHELL JOACHIM, PhD, FUTURE CITIES BY MASSIVE DESIGN
Wednesday, Dec. 9, 12:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Mitchell Joachim, PhD, a faculty member at Columbia University and Parsons the New School for Design, both in New York, is co-founder of Terrefuge, an ecological design collaborative for urban infrastructure, building, planning and art; and Terreform 1, a non-profit design group that promotes green design in urban environments. During his talk, Joachim will discuss innovative solutions for local sustainability in energy, infrastructure, buildings and food. Joachim's awards include The History Channel's City of the Future, N.Y., and Time magazine's Best Invention of the Year 2007 for a compacted car developed with MIT Smart Cities Group. He was selected by Wired magazine in "The 2008 Smart List: 15 People the Next President Should Listen To" and by Rolling Stone magazine as one of "The 100 People Who Are Changing America."

Additional lectures may be added to the schedule. For updated information, call 410-225-2300.

Image caption: Mitchell Joachim


Past Lectures

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: LANI IRWIN
Monday, Aug. 31, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Figurative painter Lani Irwin, MICA's Genevieve McMillan/Reba Stewart Chair in Painting for the 2009-2010 academic year, will introduce herself to the College community by showing slides of her paintings and sharing thoughts about how she envisions her year in Baltimore. Irwin believes art allows us to see the world through "the eyes and heart of another, feeling things we might not otherwise have felt." The endowed chair was created by the late Genevieve McMillan in 2006 to reflect the spirit and characteristics of Reba Stewart, who taught painting at MICA from 1963 until her death in 1971.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: WARREN SEELIG, MATERIALITY AND MEANING
Monday, Sept. 14, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Against the backdrop of new technology and the virtual world, the idea that meaning may be derived from "materiality" is more relevant now than ever in the history of art making, Warren Seelig, a fiber and mixed media artist, argues. In this context, Seelig will discuss the work of eight artists working with diverse materials as well as provide an overview of his own work. Since the 1970s, Seelig has insistently defined and redefined qualities that are unique to textile through his studio practice, teaching, writing and curatorial projects. He will teach Constructed Line: Drawing Through Process at MICA during the fall semester. Also, he is the subject of a retrospective, Warren Seelig: Textile per se, which takes place Friday, Dec. 4, 2009-Sunday, March 14, 2010 at MICA.

ART@LUNCH: STEPHEN CAMPBELL, MANTEGNA AND THE FIGURE IN THE CLOUDS-A RENAISSANCE ARTIST ON THE NATURE OF IMAGES
Wednesday, Sept. 16, 12:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Stephen Campbell, the chair and a professor of Johns Hopkins University's department of the history of art, will explore the theme of the "image made by chance" in early Renaissance art, focusing on Italian painter and engraver Andrea Mantegna, whose work features extraordinary metamorphoses between rock, cloud and human figures. Mantegna, it is proposed, set forth a "theory" of Renaissance art in his work that is crucially different from wellknown written formulations by Leon Battista Alberti and Giorgio Vasari.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: SAM CHRISTIAN HOLMES '84 '95
Monday, Sept. 21, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Baltimore-based sculptor, printmaker and multimedia artist Sam Christian Holmes, who earned a B.F.A. and M.F.A. from MICA and taught in the general fine arts and graphic design departments for several years, creates artwork that responds to particular localities. In working with metal, Holmes attempts to access his cultural and personal history on several levels. Recently he has begun a series of sculptures based on his book, Tar Baby Yo.

JOSE FERREIRA
Wednesday, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., BBOX, The Gateway, 1601 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Jose Ferreira, born in Mozambique and raised in South Africa, will give a lecture on his work and recent projects. His artistic practice incorporates various media in which he engages debates about the self, technology, history and post-colonialism. The works often critique cultural generalizations of stereotyping and fetishism implicit in established cinematic genres. In performances, Ferreira, an assistant professor of sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, experiments with the temporal qualities of psychological capacity, stressing the limits of physical situations in relation to his body.

DICK DURRANCE, CREATING OPPORTUNITIES: SEEING WHAT IS/IMAGINING WHAT CAN BE
Wednesday, Sept. 23, 7 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
The American Society of Media Photographers Baltimore chapter with the MICA photography department host the talk by former National Geographic photographer Dick Durrance. He uses stories and images from photographing combat in Vietnam, National Geographic articles and books, global advertising campaigns and the world's great golf courses to inspire audience members to focus on their creative vision during the challenges they face. For more information on the artist, visit Durrance's Web site http://www.dickdurrance.com.

FABRICATING IDEAS WORKSHOP AND SYMPOSIUM
As part of the Fabricating Ideas Workshop and Symposium, MICA presents lectures featuring discussions about six nationally- and internationally-known ceramics artists' work, research in new technologies, contemporary ceramics and the future of the field. Fabricating Ideas is the first event hosted by MICA's Ceramics and New Technology Research Initiative, which launches in the fall 2009 semester. Ceramic Arts Daily highlights these talks on its Web site, http://ceramicartsdaily.org.

Friday, Oct. 2, noon-1 p.m., Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
-Steven Thurston, associate professor, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
-Del Harrow, assistant professor, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa.

Friday, Oct. 2, 7-8 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
-Chad Curtis, assistant professor, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia
-Forrest Snyder, independent curator and artist, Boston

Monday, Oct. 5, 11 a.m.-noon, Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
-Neil Forrest, professor, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Halifax, Canada
-Jeanne Quinn, associate professor, University of Colorado at Boulder

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: AMY YOES
Monday, Oct. 5, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Amy Yoes is an artist working in a multi-faceted way, alternately employing painting, photography, installation, film and sculpture. An interest in decorative language and architectural space permeates all of her work. During her talk, Yoes will present a variety of works, including painting, installation, sculpture, photography and video.

CAL LANE
Wednesday, Oct. 7, 7 p.m., BBOX, The Gateway, 1601 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Sculptor and welder Cal Lane likes to work as a visual devil's advocate, using contradiction as a vehicle for finding her way to an empathetic image of opposition that creates a balance, as well as a clash, by comparing and contrasting ideas and materials. Lane will give a lecture describing her recent work, some of which has become more political due to living in a time of war and feeling the guilt of a bystander.

CHRISTOPHER COZIER '86, TOPICALITY, FLUIDITY, FLEXIBILITY: VISUAL NEGOTIATIONS FROM PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD
Thursday, Oct. 8, 7 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Christopher Cozier's writing and artwork, including installation, video, performance, drawing, painting and sound, speak to questions of individual identity within and sometimes opposed to cultural identity. During this talk, Cozier '86 examines the understanding of the Caribbean as a critical space, rather than a place. Mobile populations define the Caribbean as an experience. He questions, "Is there a particular way of seeing through contemporary Caribbean visual practice? Is this question useful?"

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: DAVID VOROS, AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND NARRATIVE IN PAINTINGS
Monday, Oct. 12, 2 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
David Voros, assistant professor and coordinator of the painting program at the University of South Carolina, will speak about his work in relation to the history of narrative painting and in the context of other contemporary works. He will focus on the interrelationships in his work between literary and visual narrative. Voros has also served as director of the International School of Art in Umbria, Italy.
Please note: This lecture in the Monday Artist at Noon Lecture Series takes place at 2 p.m. due to campus events.

JERELLE KRAUS
Friday, Oct. 16, 1-3:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Jerelle Kraus, former art director of The New York Times op-ed page, will speak as part of this semester's History of Illustration course in the art history, theory, and criticism department. She will discuss the impact of Eastern European art on the look of the op-ed page and how that has influenced editorial illustration in the last half of the 20th century. The lecture is open to the public and is followed by a reception and book-signing of Kraus' recent book, All the Art That's Fit to Print, from Columbia University Press.

MICHAEL BELL-SMITH, ADVANCED GRAPHICS
Wednesday, Oct. 21, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Michael Bell-Smith will discuss his work on the moving image and its relation to the Internet, contemporary media and art. His minimal computer animations present abstracted forms, celestial bodies and vast endless cityscapes that flow across the screen like the backdrops of early arcade games. With a nod toward art-historical developments in painting (perspectival systems) and cinema (the tracking shot and motion control systems), Bell-Smith applies the austere logic of digital media to landscape representation to create an image of a world where the familiar becomes alien.

ART@LUNCH: ROBIN GREELEY, THE MEXICAN AVANT-GARDE: VISUALIZING RURALMODERNIZATION & STATE FORMATION
Wednesday, Oct. 28, 12:30 p.m., Bunting 110, Bunting Center, 1401 W. Mount Royal Ave.
During this talk, Robin Greeley, associate professor of art history and Latin American studies at University of Connecticut, examines the role of images in modern nation-state formation in rapidly modernizing developing countries. As her main example, she will focus on the construction of a powerful, state-sponsored "revolutionary nationalism" in the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920).

SHE GUOFU, CITY PLANNING & ENVIRONMENTAL ART IN XIAMEN, CHINA
Wednesday, Oct. 28, 7 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
She Guofu, vice dean and associate professor at the Arts and Design College of Fuzhou University, will provide perspectives on city planning and public art in Xiamen, a city that boasts one of China's most progressive urban strategies in environmental sustainability. Translation will be by Wang Lu, assistant professor of English at the Arts and Design College of Fuzhou University. The talk is part of an exchange of instructors between MICA and design schools in Xiamen, China, a sister city of Baltimore. This exchange is a unique exploration of interdisciplinary design methodologies and aims to identify common themes and concerns that cross boundaries of culture, language and disciplinary separations. The MICA-Xiamen exchange is supported by MICA and Baltimore Xiamen Sister City Committee.

NEW ART DIALOGUES: CARLOS BASUALDO
Wednesday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Carlos Basualdo, who is Keith and Katherine Sachs Curator of Contemporary Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will discuss his acclaimed project Bruce Nauman: Topological Gardens, which he organized for this year's Venice Biennale. This event was co-organized by the department of art history, theory and criticism and the Contemporary Museum as part of the Museum's New Art Dialogues series.
Please note: MICA students and Contemporary Museum members: free; general admission: $10; students: $5

ART@LUNCH: RALPH M. ROSEN, THE GREEKS ON BEAUTY AND UGLINESS
Wednesday, Nov. 18, 12:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Ralph M. Rosen, Rose Family Endowed Term Professor in the department of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, will explore how society has inherited various notions of "classical" beauty in the visual and literary arts, often reflecting the tastes of later centuries as much as those of antiquity. He will discuss how the ancient Greeks theorized beauty, and how particularly their contrasting notions of ugliness can help us better understand classical aesthetics.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: MICA SKETCHBOOK CELEBRATION
Monday, Nov. 23, noon, BBOX, The Gateway, 1601 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Foundation and illustration faculty member Warren Linn and chair of painting Barry Nemett will give a joint presentation about the role of sketchbooks in their art. They will include some of their more finished pieces, grown out of their sketches. After the talk, students and faculty can display their own sketchbooks or journals for a discussion and Q & A.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: FRANK RIVERA
Monday, Nov. 30, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Frank Rivera creates small narrative paintings in the manner of the storyboard. His paintings' flat areas of solid color, sometimes patterned, contrast with graduated shading, similar to Miro's early works. A few influences are computer art, the underground comics of the mid-1980s and a re-awakened interest in the art of the predella (small serial panels affixed to the bottom of an altarpiece). Rivera's images include a variety of gesturing hands, mechanical birds, puppets, chairs and appliances performing in ways contrary to the laws of nature. The artist loves the non-sequitor and the prospect of resolving the conflict between opposites. His work is represented by the Louise Ross Gallery in New York.

Founded in 1826, Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) is the oldest continuously degree-granting college of art and design in the nation. The College enrolls nearly 3,500 undergraduate, graduate and continuing studies students from 49 states and 65 countries in fine arts, design, electronic media, art education, liberal arts, and professional studies degree and non-credit programs. Redefining art and design education, MICA is pioneering interdisciplinary approaches to innovation, research, and community and social engagement. Alumni and programming reach around the globe, even as MICA remains a cultural cornerstone in the Baltimore/Washington region, hosting hundreds of exhibitions and events annually by students, faculty and other established artists.