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Artists, Designers and Historians Lecture at MICA This Spring

Click story for a full list of speakers for spring 2010.

Posted 03.24.10 by MICA Communications

BALTIMORE--This spring MICA brings regional, national and international artists and historians to lecture at the College, discussing their work, life and career experiences. Open to the public, these lectures offer a rare opportunity to learn about the creative process from prominent contemporary figures in the art world. All events are free unless otherwise noted.

ALFREDO JAAR, IT IS DIFFICULT
Thursday, April 29, 7 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Alfredo Jaar is an artist, architect and filmmaker who lives and works in New York City, and who has exhibited extensively around the world. Jaar will focus on a selection of his public projects, including a recently inaugurated memorial entitled The Geometry of Consciousness for the victims of the Pinochet regime in Santiago de Chile.


Additional lectures may be added to the schedule. For more information, call 410-225-2300.


Previous lectures:

BRADLEY MCCALLUM AND JACQUELINE TARRY
THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES

Monday, Jan. 25, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
ART@LUNCH
Wednesday, Jan. 27, 12:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
A collaborative artist team since 1998, Brooklyn-based artists Bradley McCallum and Jacqueline Tarry have worked and exhibited internationally, seeking to surface and discuss issues revolving around marginalized members of society. Their work, which moves fluidly between large-scale public projects, performative sculpture, painting, photography, video and self-portraiture, challenges audiences to face issues of race and social justice in communities, history and family.

Beginning Thursday, May 6, McCallum and Tarry's artwork will be presented by MICA's Exhibition Development Seminar, a group of student curators, educators and designers, with the Contemporary Museum in the exhibition Bearing Witness. This collaboration will be part of Project 20, a yearlong series of exhibitions at the Baltimore museum.

JAMES HYDE
Monday, Feb. 1
, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Known for transformations of abstract paintings into physical objects, such as glass boxes, pillows and handles, James Hyde's most recent work investigates the collision of paint on the flat field of a photographic surface. He employs a broad range of materials, techniques and disciplines, including painting, sculpture and furniture design, as he fearlessly expands the vocabulary of abstract painting. He will discuss his recent paintings and explorations during his visit to MICA.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: DANIEL BOZHKOV
Monday, Feb. 8
, 10 a.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
A Bulgarian-born artist based in New York City, Daniel Bozhkov employs media from fresco to performance and video, and works with professionals from different fields, using a variety of strategies to activate the public space. Bozhkov explores varied worlds, including genetic science, department mega-stores and world-famous tourist sites in his work, seeking to produce new strains of meaning into seemingly closed systems. He will speak about his artwork and art practice during this lecture.
Please note: This lecture in The Monday Artist at Noon Lecture Series takes place at 10 a.m.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: JOSEF SCHÜTZENHÖFER '87
Monday, Feb. 15
, noon
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Josef Schützenhöfer '87 (Hoffberger School of Painting), has lived in Austria for the past 11 years and has exhibited internationally. Known for his painted portraits and his use of artwork as social commentary--including his award-winning "Popemobile" painting, En route to Mariacell (altar piece), 2005-2008, that features top-ranking European clerics sitting upon a tank--Schützenhöfer's most recent works have been factory worker portraits painted as pillars, his way of symbolizing their function in society and giving a face to a disappearing industry. He will talk about how influential MICA was in developing his career and his international experiences as an artist since he has graduated.

FRANK RIVERA, KIKI'S PARIS
Tuesday, Feb. 16
, 7 p.m.
, Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Frank Rivera creates small narrative paintings in the manner of the storyboard. His paintings' flat areas of solid color, sometimes patterned, contrast with graduated shading, similar to Miro's early works. The artist loves the non-sequitor and the prospect of resolving the conflict between opposites, topics prevalent as part of the history of Kiki's Paris. Alice Prin, aka Kiki de Montparnasse, was a French entertainer, painter and muse to many artists in the 1920s, and many credit her to having been the leading force behind a liberated Parisian culture. This talk is in conjunction with an exhibition of Rivera's work, on display in the Rosenberg Gallery, Brown Center (1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.) from Wednesday, Feb. 17-Sunday, March 21, with an opening from 5-7 p.m. Feb. 17. For more information, click here.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: HEIN KOH
Monday, Feb. 22, noon
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Hein Koh's artwork includes such divergent themes as food and toys, and familiar scenes as well as more private narrations. The paintings can range from fantastical board game high key colorful images to more traditional palettes. In all, a sense of humor seems to prevail. Koh is also an aspiring chef based in New York City with an active and current exhibition record. Koh earned degrees from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in psychology and studio art, and she completed her M.F.A. at Yale University, New Haven, Conn.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: MARGARET BOWLAND
Monday, March 1, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Margaret Bowland's paintings question beauty, race, body types and stereotypes as she ponders the significance beauty has in the 21st century. Struggles of living, conceptual notions and unique portraiture are key subjects in her tour de force, large-scale, highly structured figure compositions and her smaller-scale portraits. Recently, Bowland's Portrait of Kenyetta & Brianna was one of the commended portraits selected for special recognition in the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery competition on view at the gallery in D.C. through August 2010.

PRACTICING AS A PROFESSIONAL
Monday, March 1, 4:30 p.m.
, Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Inaugurating the first photography alumni panel, B.F.A. graduates Rose Cromwell '05, Jennifer Grimyser '06 and Daniel Shea '07 return to MICA to share their experiences of "life after college." Their projects, including as exhibiting artists and freelance photographers, have taken them to such diverse places as Panama, New York City, the Appalachian Mountains and grad school. This promises to be a lively discussion as the panel demystifies the process of writing grant applications, dealing with galleries, getting access to resources and other issues they have confronted in order to pursue their work.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: JULIE HEFFERNAN
Monday, March 8, noon
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
New York Sun art critic David Cohen, aptly describes Julie Heffernan's art as, "These paintings are a hybrid of genres and styles, mixing allegory, portraiture, history painting and still life, while in title they are all presented as self portraits." At MICA, Heffernan will present a slide talk of her lush and sensuous large-scale figuration and still life paintings, which contain symbolic references and combinations of psychological issues surrounding gender and class issues.

HOT! NEW DESIGN FROM SPAIN
Monday, March 8, 6 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
MICA celebrates new Spanish design with a lecture and exhibition featuring cutting-edge furniture, graphics, architecture and animation. These multidisciplinary events present innovative work never before seen in the United States. The panel discussion will include graphic artists Ferran Mitjans and Oriol Armengou of Toormix, a graphic design studio based in Barcelona; Nacho Carbonell, a Spanish futuristic furniture designer now working in the Netherlands; and Vicente Guallart, a Barcelona-based architect who restores and builds internationally with focuses on nature and new technologies. Pre-lecture, The Secret Sherry Society hosts a cocktail reception at 6 p.m. with a mixologist from Jose Andres' D.C.-based restaurant, Jaleo. The panel discussion follows at 7 p.m. The programs are sponsored by the Embassy of Spain with the Spain-USA Foundation as part of the program Preview Spain: Arts & Culture '10.

WARREN SEELIG
RESCHEDULED: Tuesday, March 9, 6 p.m., Decker Gallery, Fox Building, 1303 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Exhibition artist Warren Seelig discusses his work process and decades-long career in an artist's talk. Afterward, the College will celebrate the launch of the exhibition catalogue, Warren Seelig: Textile per se, at 7 p.m. in the Meyerhoff Gallery, Fox Building, where the catalogue will be available for sale and signing by the artist.

MICHAEL SKALKA, STUDIO PRACTICES: THEIR CONSEQUENCES FOR YOU AND YOR ART
Wednesday, March 10, 9:30 a.m., Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Michael Skalka is the chairman of the ASTM division for artists' materials and is a conservation administrator at the National Gallery of Art where he runs a "database," or collection, of artists' materials/products. There will be a Q&A session for everyone to participate--bring all your questions about art materials, processes, stability/conservation, health issues, etc.

DESIGN REVOLUTION: JOIN THE DEBATE
Thursday, March 11, 6:30 p.m., Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Debating how the issues of social justice and advocacy will impact the way artists conceive and execute their visual environment, a panel of top designers and editors looks at the future of design practice. Panelists include Emily Pilloton, founder, and Matthew Miller, project manager, of Project H Design, a non-profit dedicated to bringing product design to those who need it most; John Bielenberg, founder of Project M, an immersion program created to inspire young graphic designers, writers, photographers and other creative people to do work that can make a difference; and Julie Lasky, editor of Design Observer's Change Observer section, which covers socially aware design. Baltimore-based architecture and design writer Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson will moderate the discussion.

This panel is a part of the Design Revolution Road Show, an initiative of Project H Design that is traveling across the United States with an exhibition of humanitarian products that empower people and improve life. The exhibition trailer will be open for viewing before and after the panel discussion. The lecture is co-sponsored by D:center Baltimore and Urbanite magazine.

ART@LUNCH: IRENE HOFMANN, THE CONTEMPORARY MUSEUM AT 20
Wednesday, March 24, 12:30 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Irene Hofmann, the executive director of the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore, will provide an overview of where the Contemporary Museum is today, taking stock of earlier projects as well as her vision for the museum's future. Specifically, she will discuss Project 20, a yearlong series of exhibitions she is organizing to celebrate this milestone.

SPANISH DESIGN MONTH: CARLOS GRANGEL AND GONZALO RUEDA
Thursday, March 25, 5 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Two famous animators from Spain talk about their work as part of Spanish Design Month: Carlos Grangel, character design supervisor for puppet in Tim Burton's animated feature film Corpse Bride, and Gonzalo Rueda, chief technology officer of Ilion Animation Studios, creators of 2009 animation feature film Planet 51. This talk is sponsored by the the animation department and the Spanish Embassy, in connection with the exhibition at the American University museum, ANIMAR-TE: 20 Years of Computer Animation at the University of the Balearic Islands.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES
Monday, March 29, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
UPDATE: Due to unforseen circumstance Laylah Ali will not be able to attend. The lecture series will still take place as scheduled with a new speaker, to be determined.

NEW ART DIALOGUES: MEL CHIN
Wednesday, March 31, 7 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Tickets: Free, MICA students and Contemporary Museum members; $5, other students; $10, general public
Mel Chin is known for the broad range of approaches in his art, including works that encourage the community to collaborate and works that merge cross-cultural aesthetics with complex ideas. Chin's art, which is both analytical and poetic, evades easy classification as he intertwines such dichotic disciplines as alchemy, botany and ecology. His works investigate how art can provoke greater social awareness and responsibility. This is part of a lecture series by the Contemporary Museum, where Chin, in conjunction with MICA students, is presenting an installation of The Fundred Dollar Bill Project, a community-based artwork engaging school-age children in neighborhoods across the country to raise awareness about lead poisoning, through Sunday, April 11.
If you missed this lecture, it is available to view online here.

SHAPING THE CITY LECTURE SERIES: SARAH WILLIAMS, SPATIAL DATA TRACES: THE WORK OF THE SPATIAL INFORMATION DESIGN LAB
Friday, April 2, noon, Falvey Hall lobby, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Sarah Williams is director of Columbia University's Spatial Information Design Lab. Her research focuses on the representation of digital information/mapping and ecological design & planning, and her Geography of Buzz project was featured in The New York Times last year.

THE MONDAY ARTIST AT NOON LECTURE SERIES: R.M. FISCHER
Monday, April 5, noon
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Using industrial objects, electrical lighting, plumbing materials, humor, nostalgia and futuristic imagery, R.M. Fischer has constructed many large-scale public monumental sculptures throughout the United States. He also creates individual and unique, one-of- a-kind sculptures, and his Bubble World was a featured project at Deitch Projects. Recently, Fisher has created a new body of work, utilizing vinyl and fantastical comical images. His latest exhibition was named as one of the top 10 shows of 2009 by Jerry Saltz in New York Magazine.

ART@LUNCH LECTURE SERIES: JOSÉ ROCA, THE GRAPHIC UNCONSCIOUS: PRINT AT THE CORE OF CONTEMPORARY ART
RESCHEDULED: Wednesday, April 7, 12:30 p.m.
, Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Curator José Roca's talk will present the concepts behind the curatorial premise for Philagrafika 2010: The Graphic Unconscious, a citywide event in Philadelphia, January-April 2010, that explores the ubiquitous presence of printed matter in daily visual culture. Roca, the artistic director of Philagrafika 2010, is a Colombian curator working from Bogotá and Philadelphia.

GREG STEWART
Wednesday, April 7, 7 p.m., Main 110, Main Building
, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Greg Stewart, multimedia artist, lives and works in Virginia, teaching sculpture at James Madison University. Stewart's work stems from his interest in geography, more specifically, human geography-the study of how people situate or arrange themselves in the world. His work investigates aspects of mobility: mobility as a physical operation, metaphorical gesture and a spark for things that drive people's limitless imaginations. Stewart's most recent work involves the invention of complex structures and absurd situations that offer imaginary solutions to migration and survival.

SHAPING THE CITY LECTURE SERIES:
SPEEDISM, UNITED STATES OF DOOM & SYMMETRIC SIDE EFFECTS
Wednesday, April 7, 7 p.m.
, Open Space, 2720 Sisson St.
Speedism, a duo consisting of Julian Friedauer (Germany) and Pieterjan Ginckels (Belgium), works at the borders of architecture, architectural theory, visual arts, visual theory, urban tactics, imagineering and scriptwriting. As visual artists and architects, Speedism develops visual universes, theoretical landscapes, denkräume, narratives and scenarios.

SHAPING THE CITY LECTURE SERIES:
JAMES PATTEN, INTERACTIVITY BEYOND THE SCREEN
Thursday, April 8, noon
, Falvey Hall lobby, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
James Patten is the founder and principal of Patten Studio, which creates new interactive experiences and user interfaces. Patten's design and art works have been exhibited or performed in venues such as the TEDActive Innovation Lounge, the Museum of Modern Art, the Transmediale Festival in Berlin, the Museo Guggenheim Bilbao and the Museo d'Art Contemporani de Barcelona.

DR. RICHARD KALTER LECTURE SERIES: ALLEN S. WEISS, ON TRANSCENDENCE AND THE DEMONIC IN MUSIC: SOUND ART
Monday, April 12, noon, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Allen S. Weiss, author and associate adjunct professor in performance studies and cinema studies at the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University, provides a short investigation of music's symbolic aspects, the micro-structures of audiophonic representation, and the relationships of sonic mimesis to narrative and iconography. The Dr. Richard Kalter Lecture Series lecture is a tribute to MICA's beloved philosopher-in-residence who died in 2004. It is made possible by the Richard Kalter Fund, established through the generosity of faculty, alumni, staff and friends.

MAREK CECULA
Monday, April 12, 7 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Marek Cecula, visiting artist, designer and professor, will lecture on ceramics, new technologies and his work as a designer, artist and curator. Cecula's work moves fluidly between design and art, between traditional production of decorative art and advanced technologies of image reproduction. He was the head of the ceramics department at Parsons The New School of Design, New York, from 1983-2004 and is currently a professor at National College of Art and Design, Bergen, Norway. The lecture is part of MICA's Ceramics and New Technology Research Initiative.

SHAPING THE CITY LECTURE SERIES:
LIZE MOGEL, THE WORLD AS WORLD MAP
Thursday, April 15, noon
, Falvey Hall lobby, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Lize Mogel is an interdisciplinary artist who works with the interstices between art and cultural geography. She is co-editor of the book/map collection An Atlas of Radical Cartography and co-curator of the traveling exhibition An Atlas. Her exhibitions include the Gwangju Bienniale (South Korea), common room (New York), Casco (Utrecht, the Netherlands) and Experimental Geography (touring).

TOPHER DELANEY, THE EDGE EFFECT
Monday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Topher Delaney, the 2010 William O. Steinmetz '50 Designer-in-Residence at MICA, will talk about her studio's broad range of commissions, including images of the studio's explorations of how communication and physical design intersect, and its current sculpture installations. The overall mission of Delaney's studio, Seam Studio, and the topic of the talk is influenced by a quote from professor Eugene P. Odum: "The tendency for increased variety and density at community junctions is known as the edge effect." Seam's practice exists as an ecosystem thriving through the implementation of a diverse spectrum of mediums, working within architecture, writing, gardening, painting, photography, metal fabrication and graphics.

DEREK BLANKS '00
Friday, April 16, 1 p.m.
, Main 010, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Atlanta-based celebrity photographer and MICA alumnus Derek Blanks '00 will speak about his work, process and style as an in-demand Hollywood and hip-hop portrait artist. Known for his alter-ego images where he shows two sides of a person in one image, Blanks has photographed such celebrities as Jennifer Hudson, Usher, Akon and Ludacris. Blanks will be the guest MC for the Annual Benefit Fashion Show, taking place Friday, April 16 and Saturday, April 17, an event for which he also photographed the designers' collections. For more information, click here.

RALPH NADER, GETTING BIG BUSINESS OFF YOUR BACK AND OUT OF YOUR POCKET
Tuesday, April 20, 7 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Ralph Nader is a political activist, lawyer, author, lecturer, consumer advocate and four-time presidential candidate. His activism has centered on the issues of consumer protection, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government, and he has started many nonprofits and written books about these pressing topics. His talk will reflect many of the ideas expressed in his latest book, Only the Super Rich Can Save Us. After the talk, he will be available to sign books, which will be available to purchase. To view video of the lecture, click here.

ART@LUNCH: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN LESLIE KING-HAMMOND AND DAVID DRISKELL
Wednesday, April 21, 12:30 p.m.
, Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Leslie King-Hammond is the graduate dean emeritus and founding director of the Center for Race and Culture at MICA, and she is considered an authority of African-American aesthetics, women's studies and contemporary 20th-century art history. David Driskell, an emeritus professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, is an artist and scholar of African-American art and is credited with bringing this art field to American mainstream society. They will discuss the state of African-American art history.

SHAPING THE CITY LECTURE SERIES:
DAMON RICH, CITIES DESTROYED FOR CASH
Thursday, April 22, noon
, Falvey Hall lobby, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.

Damon Rich is a designer and artist who uses video, sculpture, graphics and photography to investigate the political economy of the built environment. His exhibitions, such as the recent Red Lines Housing Crisis Learning Center (2007-10), offer playful materializations of invisible forces that structure human habitats. With the Center for Urban Pedagogy (CUP), the nonprofit organization he founded and led for 10 years, Rich created innovative curricula and teaching tools for public schools and community-based organizations.

COLOR AS LIGHT: PHYSICS, PERCEPTION AND ART, A PRESENTATION BY DAN CONRAD '81
Friday, April 23, 3:15 p.m.
, Falvey Hall, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Dan Conrad '81 (Hoffberger School of Painting) is returning to the College to talk about the physics and perception of color, combining and organizing colors, the variable "meanings" of color and the chromaccord, an art of kinetic color.

CONSERVATION AND ITS OBJECT: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY DISCUSSION
Wednesday, April 28, 12:30-2 p.m., Brown 320, Brown Center, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
The practice of conservation has developed from a relatively insular field to an important area of public policy and research. How is the theory and practice of conservation shaped by the object under consideration? The panel will provide an important--indeed, a unique--perspective on comparative conservation. It will contribute to current discussions at MICA, and will expose students to career opportunities they might not have been aware of. The panel will consist of four speakers: Ana Foer, art objects conservator, fiber department technician at MICA and instructor in the department of art history; Frank Matero, building and materials conservator, University of Pennsylvania; Melissa Cohen, AIA, preservation architect in Washington, D.C.; and Eric Holcomb, city planner with the Baltimore Commission on Architectural and Historic Preservation. The panel will be moderated by Michele Lamprakos, PhD, practicing architect and instructor at MICA and the University of Maryland.

 

Canceled due to inclement weather:

KENDALL BUSTER

CANCELED: Wednesday, Feb. 10, 7 p.m., Main 110, Main Building, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Kendall Buster, a professor in the department of sculpture and extended media at Virginia Commonwealth University, will talk about her sculptural installations during her visit to MICA. Buster, an artist with an academic background in microbiology, has a multicultural interest in the history of architecture and urban development. An aesthetic built on the membranous architecture of biology, breathing life into static form, culminates in her current series of work, New Growth.

PAUL JOHNSON, A SUITCASE FULL OF POP-UP BOOKS LECTURE AND
THE MAGIC OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL BOOK WORKSHOP
CANCELED: Tuesday, April 20, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
, 2nd floor, Dolphin Building, 100 Dolphin St.
British book artist and educator Paul Johnson will discuss the power of the book as an aesthetic, architectural form as well as its special fascination for children of all ages as he pulls a library's worth of pop-up books out of a single suitcase. At the subsequent workshop, Johnson will lead participants in making several 3-D book structures and will explore a wide range of paper engineering techniques. Johnson is internationally recognized for his pioneering work in developing literacy through the book arts.

 

 

Founded in 1826, Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) is the oldest continuously degree-granting college of art and design in the nation. The College enrolls nearly 3,500 undergraduate, graduate and continuing studies students from 49 states and 65 countries in fine arts, design, electronic media, art education, liberal arts, and professional studies degree and non-credit programs. Redefining art and design education, MICA is pioneering interdisciplinary approaches to innovation, research, and community and social engagement. Alumni and programming reach around the globe, even as MICA remains a cultural cornerstone in the Baltimore/Washington region, hosting hundreds of exhibitions and events annually by students, faculty and other established artists.