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Artists, Designers, Collectors and Political Activists Speak at MICA in September, October

Acclaimed Speakers Visit the College

Posted 07.31.12 by mica communications

David Humphrey '77, "What Steve Saw," acrylic on canvas, 2011.

BALTIMORE--This fall, MICA brings regional, national and international artists and historians to the College to discuss their work, life and career experiences. Free and open to the public unless otherwise noted, these lectures offer a rare opportunity to learn about the creative process from prominent contemporary figures in the art world.

Christian Wulffen, Knowing and DoingChristian Wulffen
Tuesday, Sept. 11, 11 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Tuesday, Oct. 2, 11 a.m.
Bunting Center: Room 110, 1401 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Tuesday, Oct. 30, 11 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Tuesday, Nov. 20, 11 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.

This fall, the Hoffberger School of Painting will welcome German-born Christian Wulffen as a critic-in-residence. After becoming interested in the concrete art movement associated with Max Bill, Wulffen developed a model of working based on systems and a concern with material expression. His current work focuses on information-how it is defined, gathered, processed, encoded, decoded, assembled, displayed, received and perceived. Wulffen teaches at the Cleveland Institute of Art and has served as a visiting artist at institutions worldwide. He has exhibited widely, including at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland and at Dallas Contemporary. An archive in his name is housed at the Foundation of Concrete Art in Reutlingen, Germany. During his tenure at MICA, Wulffen will present a series of lectures focused on the rubrics of Knowing and Doing.

Image Caption: Christian Wulffen

Lunchtime Lecture: Caroline HwangCaroline Hwang, What will make you believe me?
Thursday, Sept. 13, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Brooklyn-based artist and former faculty member Caroline Hwang has broken ground in the world of illustration with her use of embroidery and patchwork in creating visual narratives. She has had her work recognized by American Illustration and the Society of Illustrators, as well as at the Print Regional Design Annual Awards. Additionally, she has been written up in Juxtapoz, BUST, Swindle Quarterly and FiberArts, to name a few. She has exhibited at Sloan Fine Art in New York, Giant Robot in San Francisco, Space 1026 in Philadelphia and at Beaver Projects in Copenhagen, Denmark. Her recent fabric-based work includes projects for apparel companies RVCA Clothing and Sublet Clothing. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA. 

Image Caption: Caroline Hwang, What will make you believe me?

Joan M.E. Gaither
Monday, Sept. 17, 10:30 a.m.
Studio Center: Room 109, 131 W. North Ave.
A native Baltimorean with a history of helping to integrate local schools and businesses during the civil rights movement, artist and educator Joan M.E. Gaither, EdD, served on the art education faculty at MICA. On her retirement, a scholarship was created in her honor for students in the Young People's Studio program. Gaither creates large, narrative quilts that address personal and social topics focused on identity and choices. In this talk sponsored by the M.F.A. in Curatorial Practice, Gaither will lecture on how her artwork documents the lives and contributions of African Americans in the history and culture of Maryland and in the greater American story.

Image Caption: Joan M.E. Gaither during the exhibition A Pathway to Awareness: Quilting for Social Justice at MICA. (Photo by Christine Ricks '08)

Eve AschheimEve Aschheim, Abysinnia, oil on canvas on panel, 2011.
Tuesday, Sept. 18, 11:30 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Eve Aschheim works in an improvisational manner, painting and repainting to invent new energetic constructions with no preconceived organizational
principle. One of the signature features of Aschheim's work is her ability to keep everything in a state of flux that seems at once fragile and bold. Her work has been exhibited at museums and galleries nationally and internationally, and is in the collections of The Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Arthur M. Sackler Museum at Harvard University and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., among others. She was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 2012 and is currently a senior lecturer in the visual arts program at the Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University. This talk is sponsored by the Hoffberger School of Painting.

Image Caption: Eve Aschheim, Abysinnia, oil on canvas on panel, 2011.

Greg LindquistGreg Lindquist, Meditation/meditation, oil and acrylic on paper, 2011.
Wednesday, Sept. 19, Noon
Brown Center: Room 320, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Greg Lindquist is a New York-based artist whose work examines the fictive distinctions between nature and culture dissolved in painting. Some of Lindquist's paintings depict enigmatic objects in the landscape, while others comment on how we experience our world. Lindquist was awarded a grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation as well as the Milton and Sally Avery Arts Foundation. His work has been featured in Art in America, the New York Sun and Sculpture, among others. Along with writing for ARTnews, the Brooklyn Rail and Beautiful/Decay, Lindquist teaches at Parsons the New School for Design in New York, the Museum of Modern Art in New York and Bergen Community College in Paramus, New Jersey. This talk is sponsored by the Hoffberger School of Painting.

Image Caption: Greg Lindquist, Meditation/meditation, oil and acrylic on paper, 2011.

Art@Lunch: Odili Donald Odita, Third Color-Third SpaceOdili Donald Odita (Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, N.Y.)
Wednesday, Sept. 19, 12:30 p.m.
Brown Center: Room 320, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Artist Odili Donald Odita will focus on his work as a painter and examine the relationships that exist between the various supports he utilizes, including paintings on canvas, Plexiglas and several wall-painting installations he has executed in museums and arts institutions around the world. Born in Nigeria and raised in Ohio, Odita creates work operating at the intersection of Western modernism and African culture. His angular abstractions of rhythmic wedges of color are informed by African textiles, digital technology, and other sources. He has had numerous exhibitions around the world, and his work is in the collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Miami Art Museum, the Studio Museum in Harlem in New York and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., among others. Odita is currently associate professor of painting at Tyler School of Art, Temple University in Philadelphia. His talk is part of the Art@Lunch Sites of Engagement lecture series organized by the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism with support from the Office of Academic Services.

Image Caption: Odili Donald Odita (Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, N.Y.)

Lunchtime Lecture: Adam WallacavageArtwork by Adam Wallacavage.
Thursday, Sept. 20, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Philadelphia artist Adam Wallacavage is a former skateboarder turned artist who has recently made a big splash with coverage in T Magazine, the style magazine of New York Times and a recent show titled Shiny Monsters at Philadelphia Art Alliance. Wallacavage's 3D work started when he began renovating his Victorian brownstone. His octopus chandeliers, which were originally designed for his 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea-themed living room, are an ingenious mix of ornate and eerie elements. Handmade with epoxy clay or cast in plaster, the fixtures sometimes incorporate vintage squeaky toys and Hello Kitty heads. His work has been exhibited at La Luz de Jesus Gallery and Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, as well as the Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome. His book, Monster Sized Monsters, is published by Ginko Press. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA.

Image Caption: Artwork by Adam Wallacavage.

Constitution Day, We the People: Freedom Of Assembly And Political SpeechCornel West
Thursday, Sept. 20, 7-9 p.m.
Brown Center: Falvey Hall, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Tickets: Free and open to the public. In addition to free tickets distributed in advance to the MICA community, a limited number of free tickets will be available to the general public on the day of the event.
Provocative scholar and activist Cornel West, Ph.D., will headline Constitution Day, a free annual symposium at MICA, co-sponsored by the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, that recognizes the ratification of the United States Constitution and the importance of free speech to the American experience.

This year's symposium centers on the widely debated topic of freedom of assembly and political speech. All over the nation and the world-from Occupy Wall Street to the Arab Spring-hundreds of thousands of people are coming together and, through the act of public assembly, making visible the grievances and hopes they collectively share. A panel of experts--including West, political activist Lisa Fithian and artist Lize Mogel, who creates insightful maps about political issues--will discuss complicated questions, including: how does the gathering of bodies in public space change the way we think about abstracted political issues?; and how do people continue to publicly assemble in a society that legislates what can constitute public space?

Known for his combination of political and moral insight and criticism, West's work focuses on the role of race, gender and class in American society. He is a prominent member of the Democratic Socialists of America and is currently a professor at Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he teaches religious philosophy and Christian practice. He is the author of 19 books, including Race Matters, a collection of thought-provoking essays that addresses a number of controversial issues of concern for African Americans.

Image Caption: Cornel West, Ph.D

Betascape
Saturday, Sept. 22-Sunday, Sept. 23, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
This exploratorium is designed for curious artists and technologists that prefer hands-on learning.  For a list of speakers, visit betascape.org. The event is sponsored by the School for Professional and Continuing Studies.

Hanneline RøgebergHanneline Røgeberg, Tongue Audit, 1999.
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 11:30 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Born in Norway and living and working in New York, Hanneline Røgeberg's work mines the paradoxes of representation and language. Røgeberg's work has been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art in Ridgefield, Connecticut; the Vancouver Art Gallery; and the Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. She has received a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and an Anonymous Was a Woman grant, among others. Currently, she is an associate professor of art at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. This talk is sponsored by the Hoffberger School of Painting.

Image Caption: Hanneline Røgeberg, Tongue Audit, 1999.

Lunchtime Lecture: Idiots' BooksRobbi Behr and Matthew Swanson of Idiots’ Books.
Monday, Oct. 8, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Idiots' Books is a small press that publishes six quirky illustrated books per year. Featuring the work of writer Matthew Swanson and illustrator Robbi Behr, the books range across subjects from funnel cakes to the Christian God. Usually satirical and often irreverent, the books aim to exploit the possibilities inherent in the quarrel between pictures and words. Their work has been praised by New York Times, USA Today, New York Magazine, Slate.com and BoingBoing.net, among others. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Robbi Behr and Matthew Swanson of Idiots' Books.

David Humphrey '77 David Humphrey ’77, What Steve Saw, acrylic on canvas, 2011.
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 11:30 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
David Humphrey '77 has been showing his paintings and sculpture  internationally since the 1980s. Occasionally referred to as a pop surrealist, his work hybridizes a variety of depiction schemes and idioms to make pieces charged with psychosocial content and narrative potential. He is the recipient of the Rome Prize fellowship, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and a variety of grants. Blind Handshake, an anthology of his art writing including reviews, essays and curatorial statements, was published in 2010 by Periscope. This talk is sponsored by the Hoffberger School of Painting and is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: David Humphrey '77, What Steve Saw, acrylic on canvas, 2011.

Cary Wolfe Cary Wolfe (Courtesy Cornell University)
Tuesday, Oct. 9, 7 p.m.
Brown Center: Falvey Hall, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Cary Wolfe, Ph.D. is the Bruce and Elizabeth Dunlevie Professor Department Chair in the Department of English at Rice University in Houston. Well known for his work in American culture, literary theory and criticism, and animal studies, Rice is the founding editor of the Posthumanities series, which publishes four to six books per year on complex questions facing the humanities. He continues to research and publish widely, including his most recent book, Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame, published by University of Chicago Press in 2012. This talk is part of the M.A. in Critical Studies' Graduate Colloquium lecture series, which is focusing on the theme Human/Animal for the fall semester.

Image Caption: Cary Wolfe (Courtesy Cornell University)

Lunchtime Lecture: Mikey Burton Mikey Burton
Thursday, Oct. 11, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Recently named one of the Art Directors Club's Young Guns, Mikey Burton proudly describes his design aesthetic as "Midwesterny," drawing inspiration from artifacts found throughout the hardworking, blue collar region-such as old type-specimen sheets, arcane equipment manuals and ancient textbooks. The Ohio native says he's "fascinated with how past designers had to come up with ideas and solve problems using limited resources." Burton founded his own studio, Little Jacket, in 2004. He has been featured in Communication Arts, Print, HOW, CMYK, LogoLounge and the Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis. His clients include New York Times, the Atlantic, GOOD, Wired magazine, Facebook, Wilco, MTV2, Sundance Channel and many more. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Mikey Burton

Lunchtime Lecture: Rachael Cole Rachael Cole
Thursday, Oct. 18, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Rachael Cole is the art director at Schwartz & Wade Books, the newest addition to Random House Children's Books, where she works on picture books and novel jackets. She has taught courses in children's picture book illustration and has been a thesis advisor at the School of Visual Arts in New York. She was an American Illustration jury member and a judge for the annual Sidewalk Arts Festival at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Her work has appeared in publications including New York Times, the Progressive and New York Press. Her brushy, graphic work has been selected twice for the American Illustration website and will appear in the upcoming 3x3 Illustration Annual. Cole also illustrated and produced a line of screen-printed cushions called Village Pillows that fit together to form the landscape of a town. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Rachael Cole

Ignite Baltimore
Thursday, Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m.
Brown Center: Falvey Hall, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Five minutes, 20 slides. What would you say? At every Ignite Baltimore, 16 selected artists, technologists, thinkers and personalities take the stage to answer this challenge with the goal of sparking new conversations and collaborations across cultures and disciplines. Sponsored by the School for Professional and Continuing Studies, Ignite Baltimore will celebrate its 11th show this year. To be notified of event updates or for more information, visit ignitebaltimore.com.

Florentijn Hofman Florentijn Hofman, Stor Gul Kanin installed in Örebro, Sweden, concrete, metal wood,and shingles, 2011.
Monday, Oct. 22, Noon
Brown Center: Room 320, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Florentijn Hofman, a Dutch artist based in Amsterdam, will lecture on his work and influences. Hofman creates sculptural and installation-based works in
public spaces. Inspired by common objects and toys-such as paper boats, stuffed animals and rubber ducks- Hofman creates large works that strive to make viewers smile and take a break from their daily life to interact with the work and one another. He has been commissioned for projects throughout Europe and South America, and has had his work featured in many overseas publications. This lecture is sponsored by the Office of Community Engagement and the Mixed Media Lecture Series and is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Florentijn Hofman, Stor Gul Kanin, installed in Örebro, Sweden, concrete, metal wood,and shingles, 2011.

Stephen Westfall Stephen Westfall, Seraphim, oil and alkyd on canvas, 2010.
Tuesday, Oct. 23, 11:30 a.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Stephen Westfall is a respected critic and painter who lives and works in New York City, teaching in the M.F.A. programs at both Bard College in New York and Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. His work has been exhibited regularly in the United States and abroad, and his writing has appeared in Art in America, Vogue, New York Times and ARTnews, among others. He is a recent recipient of the Rome Prize fellowship, as well as a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and a grant from the Nancy Graves Foundation. His work is included in the collections of the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark, the Albertina in Vienna, and more. This talk is sponsored by the Hoffberger School of Painting and is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Stephen Westfall, Seraphim, oil and alkyd on canvas, 2010.

Art@Lunch: Enrique Larrañaga, Situations: On the Pace of Engaging Places and SpacesEnrique Larrañaga
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 12:30 p.m.
Brown Center: Room 320, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
In this lecture, Enrique Larrañaga will lead a guided visit to Ciudad Universitaria de Caracas, describing the ways its planning and buildings express Venezuelan architect Carlos Raúl Villanueva's journey into and through modernity. Larrañaga will also speak about the university's unique public art collection, a synthesis of art and architecture that was the crux of Villanueva's vision to create a system of physically and referentially engaging places and spaces. Throughout his career, Larrañaga has written nearly 20 books on architecture and the arts, and has taught at more than a dozen higher education institutions throughout the Americas. He has won many prestigious awards in his field, delivered dozens of lectures and keynote speeches and exhibited work throughout the Americas. His talk is part of the Art@Lunch Sites of Engagement lecture series organized by the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism with support from the Office of Academic Services. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Enrique Larrañaga

Lunchtime Lecture: Mark Burrier Mark Burrier
Thursday, Oct. 25, 12:15 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Mark Burrier has been independently self-publishing and distributing his comics for more than a decade. He has received awards from the Society of Illustrators and American Illustration, as well as recognition in magazines including Communication Arts, Print, 3×3, HOW magazine and STEP Inside Design. In 2007, his graphic novel Noose was nominated for an Ignatz Award and was named Best Comic Book by Baltimore's City Paper, who called it "enigmatic and full of black humor." His illustrations have been shown in galleries in New York, Los Angeles, Tokyo, France and Denmark. His drawing blog Rare Words is a collaborative space where readers submit words that become the creative starting point for his drawings. Lunchtime Lectures, sponsored by the M.F.A. in Illustration Practice, bring notable illustrators, designers and artists who expand the idea of visual narratives to MICA. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Mark Burrier

Rahraw*Omarzad,*The$Third$One,$Still*from*videoRahraw Omarzad
Thursday, Oct. 25, 7 p.m.
Main Building: Room 110, 1300 W. Mount Royal Ave. 
Rahraw Omarzad, founding director of the Centre for Contemporary Arts Afghanistan (CCAA), Professor at Kabul University, as well as founder and editor of Gahnama-e-Hunar, an Afghan art magazine, will present an overview of the short history of contemporary art in Afghanistan and the role of women in Afghan contemporary art. His talk will address the importance of an art center focused on contemporary art as a tool for empowerment and the challenges for Afghan artists

Image caption: Rahraw Omarzad, The Third One, still from video.

 

Andréa Pellegrino, Implementing Social Change
Tuesday, Oct. 30, 7 p.m.
Graduate Studio Center: Auditorium, 131 W. North Ave.
Andréa Pellegrino works at the intersection of strategy, communications and business development for forward-thinking organizations dedicated to driving positive social change. She launched Pellegrino Collaborative out of a belief that working with a network of multidisciplinary collaborators is the straightest path to helping her clients impact society while building brand equity. The current model for social innovation is highly dependent on contributions of time, resources and skills. Although honorable, this model is not economically sustainable, with less than five percent of social change concepts reaching fruition. Implementing Social Change examines the critical processes of actualizing solutions to social challenges with a sense of entrepreneurial spirit. This lecture is brought to you by the M.A. in Social Design program with support from the Robert W. Deutsch Foundation.
 

Marina Warner

Marina Warner (Photo by Dan Welldon)Tuesday, Oct. 30, 7 p.m.
Brown Center: Falvey Hall, 1301 W. Mount Royal Ave.
Marina Warner, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies at the University of Essex in the United Kingdom. She is a writer of fiction, criticism and history. Her works include novels and short stories as well as studies of art, myth, symbols and fairytales. Her most recent book is Stranger Magic: Charmed States and the Arabian Nights, which chronicles the impact of the Arabian Nights on the west, retelling some of its wondrous tales. She is currently a trustee of the National Portrait Gallery in London and has been awarded nearly a dozen honorary doctorates. This talk is part of the M.A. in Critical Studies' Graduate Colloquium lecture series, which is focusing on the theme Human/Animal for the fall semester. This talk is part of Free Fall Baltimore.*

Image Caption: Marina Warner (Photo by Dan Welldon)

 

 


Free Fall Baltimore*The Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts deeply appreciates the support of its donors and media sponsors who make Free Fall Baltimore possible. Special thanks goes to Susquehanna Bank, The Abell Foundation, Joseph & Harvey Meyerhoff Family Charitable Fund and the National Endowment for the Arts, with additional support provided by American Trading and Production Corporation and the Henry and Ruth Blaustein Rosenberg Foundation.

Free Fall Baltimore media partners are The Baltimore Sun, The Urbanite, The Jewish Times, Style Magazine, City Paper, The Afro-American Newspaper, The Daily Record, Peabody Magazine, Maryland Public Television, WBAL, WJZ, Fox 45, CW Baltimore, WMAR, My 24, 92Q, Magic 95.9, Spirit 1400, WOLB, WEAA, WYPR, WWMX, and Citypeek.

 

 

Top Image Caption: David Humphrey '77, What Steve Saw, acrylic on canvas, 2011.

  

Founded in 1826, Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) is the oldest continuously degree-granting college of art and design in the nation. The College enrolls nearly 3,500 undergraduate, graduate and continuing studies students from 48 states and 61 countries in fine arts, design, electronic media, art education, liberal arts, and professional studies degree and non-credit programs. Redefining art and design education, MICA is pioneering interdisciplinary approaches to innovation, research, and community and social engagement. Alumni and programming reach around the globe, even as MICA remains a cultural cornerstone in the Baltimore/Washington region, hosting hundreds of exhibitions and events annually by students, faculty and other established artists.