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Alumni in the Baltimore Media for Interesting Career Choices

Many MICA alumni choose to use their art education in interesting and creative ways that may be just outside the "art world." Two alumni have done just that and gotten media coverage for their ventures, including features in Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Business Journal.

Posted 01.31.11 by mica communications

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Alumni

One of the biggest benefits of an arts education is you become trained to be a problem solver, and that's what lawyers do. 

Forest Boyce '09 holds up four fingers to symbolize her jockey number (photo by Jim McCue, Maryland Jockey Club).

- Cynthia Blake Sanders '85

 

Many MICA alumni choose to use their art education in interesting and creative ways that may be just outside the "art world." Two alumni have done just that and gotten media coverage for their ventures.

Drawing major Forest Boyce '09 embraced her creativity while she was at MICA, but today, she's expressing her creative side in another way: as one of the top apprentice jockeys in the country. The past year was a breakout year for Boyce, as she ended her rookie season with 129 wins, 125 second-place finishes and 109 third-place finishes out of 757 mounts.

Her love of horses was often reflected by her art. "Forest was making drawings about horses and the racetrack," recalled Tony Shore, who taught her at MICA during her junior year. "A lot of her focus was on things that she knew about horses that the normal person didn't know like the experience of going that fast."

Earlier this year, Boyce was up for an Eclipse Award, given to the Outstanding Apprentice Jockey of 2010. She finished in second place, though that didn't take away from the tremendous year she had. Boyce has received extensive press coverage including several articles in the Baltimore Sun and a plethora in race and track industry publications. Click here to read a Sun feature on her from Jan. 13.

Cynthia Blake Sanders '85, an intellectual property and entertainment attorney at Baltimore's Ober|Kaler, graduated from MICA with a degree in fiber and now she represents many arts and media clients. The Baltimore Business Journal asked her about this move, and she said: "One of the biggest benefits of an arts education is you become trained to be a problem solver, and that's what lawyers do. My education at MICA is not what you think of as traditional training for a lawyer, but it helps me think outside the box." To read the article, click here.