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Documentation Guidelines

Students seeking accommodations and/or services are encouraged to contact the Learning Resource Center prior to or upon admission; the determination of disability-related accommodations and support services is not a part of the College's admissions process.

Furthermore, the College has no legal obligation to recognize any student as having a disability until that student has established eligibility with the LRC.

To ensure the provision of reasonable and appropriate services, students must first submit a completed registration form along with documentation that meets the eligibility criteria set by the Learning Resource Center, based on Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines. The records kept in our office are strictly confidential and are not part of a student's academic record.

For a copy of our registration form, please click here.

Documentation must be current, printed on official letterhead, and signed by a qualified evaluator. Please Note: A school plan, such as an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) or 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation. To review specific documentation guidelines, please click on the appropriate link:

Guidelines for Documentation of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders

Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders (ADHD) requesting access to accommodations and/or services through the LRC must furnish documentation that meets the criteria set forth by the ADA and Section 504 guidelines. There are two ways of validating your eligibility for support: (Option One, preferred) a current neuropsychological or psycho-educational assessment-within the last 3 years-completed by a qualified professional; or (Option Two) a diagnosis from a medical doctor within the last 3 years. Guidelines for both options appear below. Note: A school plan, such as an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) or 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation.

Option One: Neuropsychological or psycho-educational assessment (preferred)

Under this option, the documentation report for a diagnosis of ADHD must include the following components:

  1. Diagnostic Interview
    The evaluator should provide retrospective confirmation of ADHD including relevant information regarding the student's academic history and learning processes in elementary, secondary and post-secondary education, a description of the problem(s) being presented; developmental, medical, psychological histories; family history; and a discussion of dual diagnosis where indicated.
  2. Assessment
    The diagnosis of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder should be based on a comprehensive review that does not rely on any one test or subtest. Evidence of a substantial limitation to learning must be apparent. The domains to be addressed must include:
    • Aptitude: a complete intellectual assessment with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or equivalent standardized tool
    • Academic Achievement: a comprehensive battery to record current levels of academic functioning and fluency in relevant areas such as reading (decoding and comprehension), mathematics (calculation and applications), and oral and written language
    • Information Processing: areas to be assessed include short and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, processing speed, executive functioning and motor ability
  3. Test Scores
    Standard scores and percentiles should be provided for all measures. The tests should be deemed reliable and valid for use with an adolescent/adult population.
  4. Specific Diagnoses
    The diagnostician must use direct language in the diagnosis, for example DSM terminology clarifying subtype such as ADHD-inattentive type, if appropriate.
  5. Clinical Summary
    A well-written diagnostic summary is a necessary component of the documentation report. It must include:
    • An interpretation of the test findings to indicate how the pattern of scores reflects the influence of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    • The evaluator's having ruled out alternative explanations for the academic problems reported
    • A determination of the substantial limitation to learning presented by the disorder and the degree to which it impacts upon the individual's performance in an academic setting
    • Recommendations for specific accommodations with a clear justification linked to those academic needs identified as associated with the disorder

Option Two: Diagnosis by medical doctor

Under this option, the documentation report for a diagnosis of ADHD must include the following components:

  1. Diagnostic Interview
    The evaluator should provide retrospective confirmation of ADHD including relevant information regarding the student's academic history and learning processes in elementary, secondary and post-secondary education, a description of the problem(s) being presented; developmental, medical, psychological histories; family history; and a discussion of dual diagnosis where indicated.
  2. Specific Diagnoses
    The diagnostician must use direct language in the diagnosis, for example DSM terminology clarifying subtype such as ADHD-inattentive type, if appropriate.
  3. Clinical Summary
    A well-written diagnostic summary is a necessary component of the documentation report. It must include:
    • An interpretation of findings to indicate how the results reflect the influence of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    • The evaluator's having ruled out alternative explanations for the academic problems reported
    • A determination of the substantial limitation to learning presented by the disorder and the degree to which it impacts upon the individual's performance in an academic setting
    • Recommendations for specific accommodations with a clear justification linked to those academic needs identified as associated with the disorder

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Guidelines for Documentation of Chronic Health Impairments

Students with chronic health impairments requesting access to accommodations and/or services through the Learning Resource Center must furnish documentation that meets the criteria set forth by the ADA and Section 504 guidelines.

This entails submitting a report, printed on letterhead, noting the findings of a recent, comprehensive medical assessment of your condition completed by a qualified, licensed physician that must include:

  • Symptoms: A description of symptoms, history of onset with severity and duration, a definitive diagnosis;
  • Impact: An indication of the impact of the disability on your functioning associated with student performance and across other University settings such as with class attendance, work completion, self-care, residence;
  • Medication: medication management, including side effects, and/or other treatment issues that might further compromise student functioning such as impaired memory, concentration, or mobility; and
  • Recommendations: Recommendations regarding specific accommodations or services linked to the assessment of functional limitations and needs that provide a clear rationale and justification for those accommodations.

Guidelines for Documentation of Learning Disorders

Students with Learning Disorders requesting access to accommodations and/or services through the Learning Resource Center must furnish documentation that meets the criteria set forth by the ADA and Section 504 guidelines. A current psycho-educational assessment completed within the last 3 years by a qualified professional is required to validate your eligibility for support. Note: A school plan, such as an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) or 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation.

The documentation report for the diagnosis of a Learning Disorder must include the following components:

  1. Diagnostic Interview
    Relevant information regarding the student's academic history and learning processes in elementary, secondary and post-secondary education should be investigated. The diagnostic interview should include: a description of the problem(s) being presented; developmental, medical, psychological histories; family history; and a discussion of dual diagnosis where indicated.
  2. Assessment
    The diagnosis of a learning disorder should be based on a comprehensive review that does not rely on any one test or subtest. Evidence of a substantial limitation to learning must be apparent. The domains to be addressed must include:
    • Aptitude: a complete intellectual assessment with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale or equivalent standardized tool
    • Academic Achievement: a comprehensive battery to record current levels of academic functioning and fluency in relevant areas such as reading (decoding and comprehension), mathematics (calculation and applications), and oral and written language
    • Information Processing: areas to be assessed include short and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, processing speed, executive functioning and motor ability
  3. Test Scores
    Standard scores and percentiles should be provided for all measures. The tests should be deemed reliable and valid for use with an adolescent/adult population.
  4. Specific Diagnoses
    The diagnostician must use direct language in the diagnosis of a learning disorder, using DSM terminology where appropriate.
  5. Clinical Summary
    • A well-written diagnostic summary is a necessary component of the documentation report. It must include:
    • An interpretation of the test findings to indicate how the pattern of scores reflects the presence of a learning disorder
    • The evaluator's having ruled out alternative explanations for any academic problems noted
    • An assessment of the substantial limitation to learning presented by the learning disorder and the degree to which it impacts upon the individual's performance in an academic setting
    • Recommendations for specific accommodations with a clear justification linked to those academic needs identified as associated with the disorder

Guidelines for Documentation of Physical Disabilities, Including Hearing and Vision Loss

Students with physical disabilities, including those with hearing and vision loss, requesting access to accommodations and/or services through the Learning Resource Center must furnish documentation that meets the criteria set forth by the ADA and Section 504 guidelines.

This entails submitting a report, printed on letterhead, noting the findings of a recent, comprehensive assessment of your condition completed by a qualified, licensed clinician that must include:

  • Symptoms: Description of symptoms, history of onset with severity and duration, a definitive diagnosis;
  • Impact: An indication of the impact of the disability on your functioning associated with student performance and across other University settings such as with class attendance, work completion, self-care, residence;
  • Medication: Medication management, if appropriate, including side effects, and/or other treatment issues that might further compromise student functioning; and
  • Recommendations: Recommendations regarding specific accommodations or services linked to the assessment of functional limitations and needs that provide a clear rationale and justification for those accommodations.

Guidelines for Documentation of Psychological Disorders

Students with psychological/psychiatric disorders requesting access to accommodations and/or services through the Learning Resource Center must furnish documentation that meets the eligibility criteria set forth by the ADA and Section 504 guidelines.

This entails submitting a report, printed on letterhead, noting the findings of a recent, comprehensive clinical assessment of your condition completed by a qualified, licensed professional that must include:

  • Symptoms: Description of symptoms, history of onset with severity and duration, a definitive diagnosis using DSM-IV terminology, and statement of prognosis;
  • Impact: An indication of the substantive impact of the disability on your functioning associated with student performance and across other University settings such as with work completion, concentrating, class attendance, social interactions, self-care;
  • Medication: Medication management plan, including side effects, and/or other treatment issues further compromising student functioning such as sleep problems, impaired memory or judgment; and
  • Recommendations: Recommendations regarding accommodations or services considered appropriate to meet your needs linked to the assessment of functional limitations that provides a clear rationale and justification for those accommodations.

Guidelines for Documentation of Temporary Disabilities

Students may present with a temporary disability, such as physical injury, which may impact their academic performance. Access to accommodations through the Learning Resource Center may be deemed appropriate to support those needs.

If you require assistance with participation in the academic program due to such circumstances you must furnish to the LRC a statement on letterhead completed by a qualified clinician which provides:

  • A description of the problem;
  • An assessment of how the injury compromises academic performance;
  • A prognosis or expected length of impact on the student; and
  • Suggestions for needed accommodations or services such as note-taker support or scribe for exams.

Upon registering a request for this assistance, the LRC will determine whether it, or another campus department, can provide temporary accommodations.